Author Topic: Is packing food necessary - Southern Tier  (Read 2142 times)

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Offline LarryJ

Is packing food necessary - Southern Tier
« on: September 03, 2007, 09:03:06 pm »
During a fall ride along the southern tier, can I expect to find stores along the way where I can buy food for the day, or are there portions of the trail where I would need to carry my own food (and stove) for more than a day?

This message was edited by LarryJ on 9-4-07 @ 9:19 AM

Offline ptaylor

Is packing food necessary - Southern Tier
« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2007, 04:03:24 pm »
Larry. I've never done the Southern Tier, but I have done a lot of other ACA routes. I have never gone a full day without finding at least one open grocery, even on holidays.

When you get your ACA maps, they will identify all grocery stores along the route, so you can buy your food as close to camp as possible. The info is about 99% accurate...so carry a couple of extra energy bars as an emergency ration when in a sparsely populated area.

Paul
Paul

Offline staehpj1

Is packing food necessary - Southern Tier
« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2007, 08:12:57 pm »
I haven't done the Southern tier, but...

On our recent TransAmerica we found that we could usually get food at regular enough intervals.  What choices we had were often very limited though.

Depending on what you want to eat you may want to buy a day ahead in some cases.

Also some things do not come in one meal portions so you may need to buy multiday supplies of some items.

I personally always would carry enough of something to get by for a day "just in case".  That could just be a few powerbars or some dried refried beans and instant rice.

Before you leave be sure you have the latest copies of the addenda for your route.

In some areas many places had closed recently or were temporarily closed for one reason or another.  So it is best to be a bit cautious in sparsely populated areas.


Offline MichaelTheWingN

Is packing food necessary - Southern Tier
« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2007, 08:46:27 pm »
After Del Rio, you should pack a lunch, towns can be 50 or 60 miles apart and I would suggest at least one emergency meal after Del Rio...Better safe then sorry...Beyond that, it should be all good!

Have a good ride!

Get a bicycle. You will not regret it. If you live. Mark Twain
Get a bicycle. You will not regret it. If you live. Mark Twain

Offline damselfli

Is packing food necessary - Southern Tier
« Reply #4 on: September 06, 2007, 11:29:43 pm »
food might not be absolutely necessary, but energy and water are. as they say - - don't leave home without it. best to take 'something' in case your blood sugar dives after a long hill, a long day, a hot day. have fun!


Offline mudmin

Is packing food necessary - Southern Tier
« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2007, 04:18:48 pm »
Everyone's right about food places being fairly plentiful. In the very small towns be careful though because EVERYTHING closes at 4 or 5 o'clock. This is especially true in central to west Texas.

Also, as I've told many other people, much of the road changes and hills of the ACA route can be avoided by going on US-90 through much of (From E to W) Florida, Alabama, all the way from the Texas/LA Border to Van Horn, Tx. Take I-10 in west Texas to Phoenix area and I-8  west all the way to 30 miles before the end of the trip, then pick up the AC route again.


Offline RussellSeaton

Is packing food necessary - Southern Tier
« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2007, 11:33:51 am »
"Also, as I've told many other people, much of the road changes and hills of the ACA route can be avoided by going on US-90 through much of (From E to W) Florida, Alabama, all the way from the Texas/LA Border to Van Horn, Tx. Take I-10 in west Texas to Phoenix area and I-8  west all the way to 30 miles before the end of the trip, then pick up the AC route again."

Your alternative route across the southern part of the US sounds like a very good route for driving if one wanted to avoid the Interstates in the SE but pick them up in the SW.  But I am having a hard time figuring out why a bicyclist would want to ride on an Interstate shoulder for the west half of the southern tier and a major US highway for the east half of the southern tier.  I'm sure its a very direct route with no extra miles of riding.


Offline ptaylor

Is packing food necessary - Southern Tier
« Reply #7 on: September 10, 2007, 03:53:37 pm »
Russell: well put. I expect most bike tourists will agree.

Paul
Paul