Author Topic: Highway question  (Read 5014 times)

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Offline WardenB

Highway question
« on: January 27, 2008, 07:37:37 pm »
I am a new member, and want to take my first tour, either solo or with others. So my questions may sound silly. I was wondering about the cyclists I see riding on the interstate. Is that legal? I see them riding south of Boise sometimes.


Offline staehpj1

Highway question
« Reply #1 on: January 27, 2008, 08:22:39 pm »
In some places yes it is.  It depends on where.

There was some discussion on Bike Forums at:
http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=123478&highlight=interstate


Offline DaveB

Highway question
« Reply #2 on: January 27, 2008, 09:46:35 pm »
In the mid and far West, riding a bicycle on interstate highways is sometimes legal since there are no alternative roads.  It will vary and you will need to ask about specific roads and locations.  

As a general rule, in the East and Southeast it's illegal everywhere.


Offline dfege

Highway question
« Reply #3 on: January 30, 2008, 04:18:17 am »
It really depends on the state and safety. In 1990 I rode across Montana and was on I94/I90 most of the way.  There was VERY little traffic.  After awhile, I didn't even ride on the shoulder anymore, just stayed in the right hand lane.  I have also been told that one can ride on I-5 from Ashland to just south of Portland, but have never done it.  However, generally it is not allowed to ride on Interstates because of safety.


Offline BigEd

Highway question
« Reply #4 on: February 02, 2008, 10:33:30 pm »
I recently went on a tour in southwest Utah and was surprised to learn that interstate highways were open to bicycles.  In the east they are not.  It was no fun.


Offline johnsondasw

Highway question
« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2008, 05:58:42 pm »
I live in the middle of Washington.  You can ride I90 all the way from Seattle to Spokane. Watch for dangerous junk on the riding shoulder anywhere on this interstate!

May the wind be at your back!
May the wind be at your back!

Offline Carl

Highway question
« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2008, 11:46:56 pm »
What's it like going over Snoqualmie Pass on a bike? I thought bikes had to get off near Ellensburg.


Offline johnsondasw

Highway question
« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2008, 01:48:31 am »
I've ridden over Snoqualmie many times. You have an 8 foot shoulder almost the whole way.  Your main dangers are all the stuff--boards, metal, car parts, miscellaneous items off trucks, even furniture on the riding lane.  The cars have never really been a problem especially with a ripple strip between the biker and the car lane.  There is one other hairy situation, and that's the snowshed westbound along the side of Lake Keechelus about 3 or 4 miles before Snoqualmie summit.  The shoulder is reduced to a foot or two and the section is too long to get through before the cars come, because you can't see the road back far enough when entering the tunnel.  Also, shoulders are reduced a lot over bridges, but for those you can see far enough back to wait for an opening.  Watch out, because if there's debris clogging that reduced lane width, you've got nowhere to go. Despite all of this, I like the ride--great grade, nice views, good stops in Easton, the Summit, and North Bend.  Also, use a mirror!  

May the wind be at your back!
May the wind be at your back!

Offline bogiesan

Highway question
« Reply #8 on: February 14, 2008, 10:03:44 am »
> I see them riding south of Boise sometimes.

Lots of training possibilities in the Boise area, several charity rides and
centuries. Drop by one of the bike shops and look for the posters and
pamphlets. RIDE IDAHO would be your perfect first tour. As of Feb 15, it
was already half full.

rideidaho.org

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."
I play go. I use Macintosh. Of course I ride a recumbent

Offline litespeed

Highway question
« Reply #9 on: February 18, 2008, 01:34:05 pm »
I've ridden interstate shoulders all over the west, mainly in the southwest. It's generally all right everywhere except where the traffic is heavy - near cities or heavily used corridors like Phoenix-Tucson.

Montana is no problem as there are no large cities and the interstates are lightly used.

I have used freeways where it wasn't really legal in order to avoid a long detour. A good example of this is in New Jersey where US9 uses the Garden State Parkway for 2 1/2 miles over the Mullica River near New Gretna. Cops passed me both times I've done this but didn't stop.

I've been booted off freeways a couple of times but with my dumb, innocent, polite demeanor the cops just checked me out and sent me on my way.

From El Centro CA to San Antonio TX I traveled on I8 and I10 about 80% of the time. Generally not very scenic but usually the only practical choice.


Offline BigEd

Highway question
« Reply #10 on: February 19, 2008, 09:46:26 am »
To litespeed:  I'm getting ready to do the Southern Tier and know I'll be riding on I8 and I10 some but certainly not the majority.  How come you chose to ride that route for such a long distance?  Just curious.  


Offline litespeed

Highway question
« Reply #11 on: February 19, 2008, 10:58:25 pm »
It was late in the year - November - so I wanted to travel as far south and as low an elevation as possible in order to stay as warm as possible. I regret that I didn't swing south through Alpine and Del Rio but I was pressed for time - had a plane to catch in San Antonio. Next time....