Author Topic: Tour Planning - Ten months out  (Read 13485 times)

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Offline staehpj1

Tour Planning - Ten months out
« Reply #15 on: November 07, 2008, 08:35:33 am »
I hope the bike and trailer work out well for you.  Have a great time touring!

Some shorter tours to learn are not a bad idea, but... They are not an absolute necessity.  You can do a long tour as a first tour if that works for you.  Three of us did a coast to coast with no real touring experience, but a lot of camping experience.  It worked out very well.

Short tours and long tours are an entirely different thing.  You may like one and not the other.  I love to be on the road, but tours of less than a week just aren't that much fun to me.  I'd rather do day rides than do a weekend tour.  My point is that you should keep an open mind if you try a short tour and don't like it much.  You may still like the cross country type experience.


Offline Rep

Tour Planning - Ten months out
« Reply #16 on: December 27, 2008, 01:02:56 am »
staehpj1, wrote...

"I hope the bike and trailer work out well for you.  Have a great time touring!

Some shorter tours to learn are not a bad idea, but... They are not an absolute necessity.  You can do a long tour as a first tour if that works for you.  Three of us did a coast to coast with no real touring experience, but a lot of camping experience.  It worked out very well.

Short tours and long tours are an entirely different thing.  You may like one and not the other.  I love to be on the road, but tours of less than a week just aren't that much fun to me.  I'd rather do day rides than do a weekend tour.  My point is that you should keep an open mind if you try a short tour and don't like it much.  You may still like the cross country type experience."

In the months since I began this thread, the above by staehpj1 has become increasingly apparent.

I have spent my time and money learning more about touring as well as developing a plan to upgrade bikes and equipment.

I think this spring I will take three short tours in WI & MN.  Two will accumulate 4-500 miles each with another that will stretch to 150 miles.  That will be my shake down.

I may have an opportunity to be dropped off out west and ride bake to WI later in the summer.

I continue to ride this winter, but the reasons are different from touring but do keep me on the bike each day.

Bicycling, Brewing & Backgammon...What a life.

Offline Westinghouse

Tour Planning - Ten months out
« Reply #17 on: December 28, 2008, 06:52:24 am »
You can follow highway 2 for quite a long distance on your proposed route. ACA has maps for what you want to do. I would take a look at those maps. They contain information  that may prove to be invaluable to you.

I did 2600 miles of the N-tier in  1987, west to east. I flew from Florida to Seattle, cycled to Ana Cortes, and began from there. I did so because of what I had heard about prevailing winds. I can only tell you from what I remember, which is not very much as this was not a journaled tour. Wind, as I remember it, was not that much of a concern until I had gotten out of the mountains, and down into the foothills. There in the foothills I do vividly remember very strong winds blowing from west to east. The land was rolling. It was like being on a moped or something. Much of the time I could not even get torque in my highest gear. I would not attempt to pedal against such forceful winds. That is about all I can remember about that.

This message was edited by Westinghouse on 12-28-08 @ 4:00 AM

Offline Rep

Tour Planning - Ten months out
« Reply #18 on: January 01, 2009, 10:31:08 am »
Hi
Does anybody have any good sites they visit for menu ideas, food planning and tips?

I will want to cook at least one simple meal a day as well as some type of healthy snack with a restaurant meal thrown in as well.

The only purchase I really need to make yet is a stove.  I am thinking of the MSR Whisperlite International from REI.  Anybody use this one?

Thanks

Bicycling, Brewing & Backgammon...What a life.

Offline Westinghouse

Tour Planning - Ten months out
« Reply #19 on: January 01, 2009, 01:41:25 pm »
I am not certain how obtainable these books still are.
"Eat To Win"  "Sports Nutrition"

I have not used the Whisperlite myself; however, I have spoken with one or two people who have, and I have read many bicycle touring journals. People are completely satisfied with it from what I am able to ascertain. I cannot imagine you would be making a mistake choosing it for your tour. In fact, it an excellent choice.


Offline geegee

Tour Planning - Ten months out
« Reply #20 on: January 02, 2009, 12:38:58 am »
I have a Whisperlite but I use it mostly when I am kayak-camping. When I solo
tour on a bike I prefer taking a Primus
Express Stove
because I personally hate carrying liquid fuel in my
panniers. This thing is so incredibly small when folded up and the integrated lighter is
super handy. The stove and fuel cartridge fit conveniently into a
Litech Trek Kettle Pot.
I wrap the cartridge in a microfibre cloth before slipping it into the pot to keep from
scratching the non-stick surface, and it doubles as a dish rag. This is the most
compact cooking set up I've come across so far. I've pulled off the side of the road
and boiled up some ramen noodles in no time flat, ate out of the pot and just wiped
up the pot until I could get to the next place I could properly wash it out.

I've gotten good at making one-pot meals. I guess like a lot of cyclists I've met,
my favourite food staples revolve around variations on pasta or rice. Macaroni
and Cheese is always easy and I jazz it up with a can of smoked oysters or flaked
ham. On my last tour I came across a roadside stand that sold dried morel
mushrooms and they were awesome cooked with rice, then a bit of butter stirred
in. yum!

This message was edited by geeg on 1-1-09 @ 10:02 PM

Offline staehpj1

Tour Planning - Ten months out
« Reply #21 on: January 02, 2009, 08:25:34 am »
A warning on gas cartridge stoves.  Fuel is very hard to find in much of the US.  We tried every Walmart and sporting goods store from Pueblo to Kentucky without finding any.

It is possible to ship isobutane fuel via ground mail (domestic mail only). The package must have the following label attached on the address side of the package:
"Surface Mail Only
Consumer commodity
ORM-D"

This will allow you to get fuel via general delivery in the portion of an xc trip where fuel was impossible to find if you have someone willing to mail stuff to you.


Offline Rep

Tour Planning - Ten months out
« Reply #22 on: January 02, 2009, 09:09:40 am »
Thanks for the advice.  I do think I will pack the Whisper mainly because of fuel availability.  I can always try this and move to a Primus type stove later if I don't like the liquid fuel option.



Bicycling, Brewing & Backgammon...What a life.

Offline staehpj1

Tour Planning - Ten months out
« Reply #23 on: January 02, 2009, 09:56:17 am »
I really like the isobutane cartridge stoves, but yes the ability to find white gas is easier.  On the other hand it can be hard to find white gas in quantities under a gallon sometimes.  I think that in a pinch the Whisperlite might also burn unleaded gasoline.

The whisperlite has had some reported problems with the plastic pump.  You may want to either:

[list=1]
  • Be very careful with the pump.
  • Carry spare parts.
  • Or, maybe consider the Optimus Nova (more expensive, but with a metal pump).


You might want to read the discussion at:
http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/forum/board/message/?o=3Tzut&thread_id=80057&v=1n&page=1&nested=0



Offline jamesfrank

Tour Planning - Ten months out
« Reply #24 on: January 02, 2009, 11:35:35 am »
My name is James, and I too seek advice advice about a tour.  But I plan on biking around the World on a mountain bike (my favorite).  And I too am from WI (Watertown), and 58!  What a coincident!

Although my touring experience is limited, in 2000  I toured parts of England and Wales.  It was a Great ride and adventure, but my MB (a rather expensive one) was stolen in London.  So make sure your bike is well secured and insured!  Fortunately, my bike was insured, and when I returned to WY I bought a new MB.

Keep in touch!

James

abnjim6@gmail.com


Offline Rep

Re: Tour Planning - Ten months out
« Reply #25 on: April 30, 2009, 10:18:19 pm »
Well, equipment is coming together.  I found an REI Novara Safari on Craig's list.  It was purchased new last May and I got it for $475.00

Then, on e-bay I found a BOB that was delivered yesterday.

So things are coming together and it is time to decide where to go.

I may do some statewide or regional tours next summer then plan a long 6 week type tour that next year.

Of course, I want to head out tomorrow.  That would be in a snowstorm I guess.  Not the best idea.

Drink beer, gain weight.  Ride bike, lose weight.

It is kind of fun to read this old thread.  The Safari is working out very well.  I have 700 miles on it so far this spring.  I have gathered all of the equipment I need for touring.  Well, one is never fully supplied, right?

I head out on my first regional tour in two days.  I am going solo to Green Bay, WI, a trip of 225 miles by car.  I plan on four days there, some time with family and four days back.

I can't wait.
Bicycling, Brewing & Backgammon...What a life.

Offline johnsondasw

Re: Tour Planning - Ten months out
« Reply #26 on: April 30, 2009, 11:34:15 pm »
Best of luck, and have a great ride.

One quick consideration--think about using a mirror, if you're not already.  I wouldn't ride the roads, city or country, without one.  I've been riding bikes for 50 years, and for about 35 of them with a mirror.  There have been several times I've had to take evasive action, i.e., riding off the road onto the shoulder or into the ditch, because of approaching cars from the rear looking like they're going to hit me.

I know most riders don't use them.  I've got a friend who claims he can tell by the sound if a car is coming too close.  Bou, I sure can't hear well enough to tell if a car is coming a foot or two closer to the right where I'm riding!

Again, all the best!
May the wind be at your back!

Offline Rep

Re: Tour Planning - Ten months out
« Reply #27 on: May 01, 2009, 08:34:21 am »
Best of luck, and have a great ride.

One quick consideration--think about using a mirror, if you're not already.  I wouldn't ride the roads, city or country, without one.  I've been riding bikes for 50 years, and for about 35 of them with a mirror.  There have been several times I've had to take evasive action, i.e., riding off the road onto the shoulder or into the ditch, because of approaching cars from the rear looking like they're going to hit me.

I know most riders don't use them.  I've got a friend who claims he can tell by the sound if a car is coming too close.  Bou, I sure can't hear well enough to tell if a car is coming a foot or two closer to the right where I'm riding!

Again, all the best!

Thanks for the suggestion about the mirrors.  I do have one on all my bikes.  I keep an eye on approaching cars and wait to see them break for the, "line", then I know I am safe.

In addition, I run a P7 flashlight on strobe whenever I leave my garage, night or day.  I turn my lights on just like the newer autos do when their key is turned.  In addition, I have a Vetta taillight that does not wash out in the daylight.

Bicycling, Brewing & Backgammon...What a life.

Offline roadrunner

Re: Tour Planning - Ten months out
« Reply #28 on: May 04, 2009, 04:07:08 pm »
Rep -- I've used a Whisperlite stove on several tours and found it works well.  Obtaining fuel in other than gallon containers can be difficult.  Some outdoor equipment stores sell it in small quantities; another possibility is buying enough to fill your fuel container from  car campers who have a gallon for their camp stove (they'll probably just give it to you).  The best way to carry the fuel bottle is in a water bottle cage.  If your Safari is like mine, a cage can be mounted on the bottom of the down tube, a perfect place for the fuel. If it does leak, no problem.

If your considering additional "short" tours, a wonderful area that's not too far for you is Michigan's Upper Peninsula, particularly the Keweenaw Peninsula.  Adventure Cycling once rated it as one of the 10 best places to tour in the U.S.  I use to live there, and it's got many attractions for touring -- Lake Superior shoreline roads, forests, inland lakes, friendly small towns, historic sites, etc.

Offline Rep

Re: Tour Planning - Ten months out
« Reply #29 on: May 12, 2009, 12:52:53 pm »
Rep -- I've used a Whisperlite stove on several tours and found it works well.  Obtaining fuel in other than gallon containers can be difficult.  Some outdoor equipment stores sell it in small quantities; another possibility is buying enough to fill your fuel container from  car campers who have a gallon for their camp stove (they'll probably just give it to you).  The best way to carry the fuel bottle is in a water bottle cage.  If your Safari is like mine, a cage can be mounted on the bottom of the down tube, a perfect place for the fuel. If it does leak, no problem.

If your considering additional "short" tours, a wonderful area that's not too far for you is Michigan's Upper Peninsula, particularly the Keweenaw Peninsula.  Adventure Cycling once rated it as one of the 10 best places to tour in the U.S.  I use to live there, and it's got many attractions for touring -- Lake Superior shoreline roads, forests, inland lakes, friendly small towns, historic sites, etc.

Thanks roadrunner

I just got back from my first solo self supported tour and am ready to head out again. 

I used unleaded gasoline in my whisperlite and it worked very well. 

Actually, I have been thinking of heading north to Lake Superior.  I was thinking Ashland, WI before heading SE to visit my sister in the Antigo area, then rolling back home through Wausau. 
Bicycling, Brewing & Backgammon...What a life.