Author Topic: California coast watch out..New bike on the way!  (Read 1903 times)

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Offline MarkWF

California coast watch out..New bike on the way!
« on: October 08, 2008, 07:04:49 am »
Have a new bike coming in the next week or so. With this in mind I've been cruising the net trying to find a  forum area that I could call home and learn and grow with my new found hobby. So far I haven't been that impressed...
  This will be the first time, I'm planning on taking bicycling to the next level..  As more then just a bike, that I ride to get around town, or go back and forth to work on.. I've been riding bikes like this off and on my whole life, without a thought.  Now I'm reading and looking up all kinds of information online and finding a whole new world of interest and active things to do on a bike.. You folk's blow me away and have me thinking about all kinds of new adventures and things I can get into, with biking.
  First step is to slowley get in shape and take advantage of some of the new bike routs that have been popping up around my neck of the woods. Inland Impire outside of LA.  

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santa_Ana_River_bicycle_path

  If all goes well I will add, the bike to my camping trip next April or May. Plan on camping on the back side of Morro Bay and head out for day trip outings. Using the camp grounds as a way point.. Grew up on the central coast of Calif. So I know all the back roads and hide away spots through out San Luis Obispo county. Should be a fun trip this year.. Last two years I've camped in Morro Bay but drove.. This next year it will be on the bike..

Wish me luck!

New to biking in a serious way!
MarkWF

New to biking in a serious way!

Offline wanderingwheel

California coast watch out..New bike on the way!
« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2008, 04:55:29 pm »
I used to regularly ride the Santa Ana River Trail from the beach out to Yorba LInda and Corona.  Look closely and you can find some good roads hiding in the Inland Empire.  I used to especially love Cajalaco Road by Lake Mathews, but it has become a well known short cut between 15 and 215 so I'd avoid it now.  Carbon Canyon and Brea Canyon are great rides.  There are also some good roads around Yucaipa and Beaumont, believe it or not.  I recommend Jack Rabbit Trail and Live Oak Canyon.  As you get in shape, you can challeng yourself on Oak Glen and the various ways up to Big Bear.

Welcome and Good Luck!
Sean


Offline MarkWF

California coast watch out..New bike on the way!
« Reply #2 on: October 09, 2008, 09:13:36 am »
Thanks for the reply Sean.. They just got done with a huge project to link up a lot of the Sana Anna Trail.

Hidden Valley Wildlife Preserve has really done a great job.. Grading the trail and putting in a major hub for the bike path, in the park.. I'll start out there and go towards San Bernardino to get started.. Mix in going towards the beach now and again. Starting from Green River Golf Course in Corona.(Right by were I work)

http://www.riversidecountyparks.org/park-directory/all-parks/hidden-valley/


Should get me started.  ;)



MarkWF

New to biking in a serious way!
MarkWF

New to biking in a serious way!

Offline whittierider

California coast watch out..New bike on the way!
« Reply #3 on: October 09, 2008, 02:51:57 pm »
There are a lot of great rides in the San Gabriel mountains, San Bernardino mountains, Santa Monica mountains, etc..  From our house about 15 miles east of downtown L.A., we can take the San Gabriel River trail up to Hwy 39 up into the mountains past Crystal Lake to Hwy 2 and go all the way to Wrightwood, 65 miles each way, and reaching nearly 8,000 feet, with only one traffic light for the whole trip.  Mt. Baldy and the ski area at 6500' IIRC are popular destinations for cyclists' day rides.  We normally go up there by way of Glendora Mtn. Rd. and Glendora Ridge Rd. in order to avoid more miles of city streets which we get when we go up Mt. Baldy Rd..

We tried to ride to Big Bear Aug 4th but didn't finish the ride because our younger son got in a traffic accident and broke his collar bone at an intersection in Rimforest after we had completed most of the climbing.  I would not recommend riding up Hwy 18 in the summer when there is a lot of traffic with RVs (and renters driving them!), fifth-wheelers, very wide boat trailers, etc. on the very narrow last half.  Definitely use a mirror.  I had to motion many times for people coming up behind to leave me more room or just not pass until it was safer.  They complied; but I might have been knocked down over a cliff if I didn't have the mirror.

Most of the California coast makes for excellent riding as well, but most of the year you will want to ride from north to south, not vice-versa, because of the wind.  Take Amtrak up to your starting point and ride down, or, if you just ride to San Diego, ride down and take the train back.  From the Santa Ana train station to the San Diego train station is about 100 miles.  From the Fullerton station it's about 107 if you ride the freeway through the Camp Pendelton area, maybe a little more otherwise.

I would like to learn the route out the Santa Ana River trail to Riverside since I have a couple of sibblings out there.  It may not be the shortest route for me, but using the trail will cut out a lot of stop-and-go city riding.


Offline Westinghouse

California coast watch out..New bike on the way!
« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2008, 11:01:25 am »
There seem to be two different opinions on getting in shape for a long tour. One says you can get in condition on the tour, and after a few weeks you will be sufficiently strong to handle the rest. The other says to work out and get in shape before the tour. I try to adhere to the latter of the two. For example, I worked out in a gym three times a week for eight months before cycling from south Florida to New York City. The thing about getting in shape before touring is that it strengthens the legs and upper body. Toned, strengthened, stretched, muscles are more efficient and less liable to injury. Strengthened arms and shoulders alleviates the soreness that comes from the front-leaning-rest position over drop handlebars. And besides all that, it feels better to be exercised.