Author Topic: STI and handlebar bags  (Read 10222 times)

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Offline driftlessregion

STI and handlebar bags
« on: November 25, 2003, 02:44:24 am »
Tonight I saw on the Arkel Panniers site about using either Avid Rollamajig or V-brake "noodle" to allow large handlebar bags wtih STI levers. Installed where the shifter cable exits the lever it directs the cable down without harming it. Does anyone have any experience with this system?

Does anyone have opinions about the reliability of STI on a long tour?



Offline biker_james

STI and handlebar bags
« Reply #1 on: November 25, 2003, 09:04:53 am »
When I changed cables this past spring I put on "noodles" on the shift cables of my Cannondale. I am not sure if I would do it again or not. It does give more clearance for my bar bag, but I sometimes (not always) think that the shifting isn't quite as good. But that may just be me on those days. I do think if you're riding without the bar bag, they look a bit funny, but so what.
My wife and I have had our Cannondales for nearly 4 years, and use them for rec riding and loaded touring. Last year and this year we did trips of about 1600 km (each year) and have done a bunch of shorter tours. The shifters have never created a problem. Our bikes use Tiagra, ranked pretty low in the Shimano world, so I would expect 105's or up to be even more reliable. Even Adventure Cycling has said that anticipated reliabilty problems with STI's have not developed. I like the STI's too much to go to barends because one time in 5 years or more I lose a day or two cause a shifter strips out.


Offline driftlessregion

STI and handlebar bags
« Reply #2 on: November 26, 2003, 10:09:51 pm »
Glad to hear that the predicted unreliability of STI may not be as bad as I thought. I have 105's and love them but don't mind swapping bar-ends for my Northern Tier trek next summer if necessary. I've had them on for 2000 miles now and wonder if they will break in the middle of ND. Anyone else?


Offline mjarvis

STI and handlebar bags
« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2003, 11:09:57 am »
I have this type of setup on my Trek 520 but my bag is made by Topeak - one of their larger ones....

I'm relatively new at this, having only logged about 1200 miles on the bike, but so far I haven't had any problems. The bag does seem to push the cables out of the way a bit but it works well enough for me to not really notice anything. I often times ride a bit agressively so I'm flying thru the gears and/or hitting the brakes. So far, so good.


Offline don quixote

STI and handlebar bags
« Reply #4 on: January 07, 2004, 03:33:37 pm »
I suggest you write to Serge at Arkel: info@arkel-od.com  He is very knowledgable and will give it to you straight.  I have a full set of their bags and they are top quality.
George Olmstead
San Diego

don quixote
San Diego

Offline DaveB

STI and handlebar bags
« Reply #5 on: January 07, 2004, 06:46:58 pm »
STI shifters have proven very reliable in my experience.  I have over 30,000 miles on a set of 8-speed 105 triple STIs and there have been no problems of any kind.  A squirt of Tri-Flow every few months is all the maintainance they get.

My son-in-law had over 25,000 miles on the same model 105 8-speed levers when he upgraded to 9-speed and the 105's were still working fine.

My son has 15,000 miles on a set of RSX 7-speed STI levers (the bottom of Shimano's line at the time) and they still function perfectly.

The few problems I've heard of with STI's have been gradual stickiness and reluctant shifting, not catastrophic failure.

I ride with both STIs and barcons.  STI's are FAR better.  




Offline bikerken

STI and handlebar bags
« Reply #6 on: January 07, 2004, 07:54:22 pm »
Re: STI
I've toured with STI, barcons and down-tube shifters. The STI's are clearly more convenient unless you want to carry a handlebar bag but I've gone to down-tube shifters for my "real" touring bike. I was the designated mechanic for a cross-Canada tour in 2001 and we had lots of rain and also lots of trouble with STI shifters. They are made to function very smoothly in dry, clean conditions but are much more sensitive to less than ideal conditions. The Campy integrated shifters seem to be more robust, possibly due to stronger springs, which also make it a bit more difficult to pop a shift. For my money, a good pair of down-tube or barcon shifters are best for touring if you're not really good at cleaning and fine-tuning the STI shifters on the road.
Ken


Offline driftlessregion

STI and handlebar bags
« Reply #7 on: January 09, 2004, 02:46:15 am »
Would a squirt of Tri-Flow periodically on a wet tour prevent the problems you mention?


Offline biker_james

STI and handlebar bags
« Reply #8 on: January 09, 2004, 08:57:25 am »
Thatts about all it normally takes to get them shifting right again. I had a couple days this year when touring in the rain that I worried about the shifters, but the problem was actually solved by a little cleaning & lube where the cable runs under the bottom bracket. The only other thing you might have to do other than lube is use the adjusters to take slack out of the cables. None of this is very high tech or beyond what anyone should be able to do to their bike. They are still pretty simple machines to maintain.


Offline AdamK

STI and handlebar bags
« Reply #9 on: January 21, 2004, 10:24:41 pm »
The noodles work well in diverting your cables to allow for a handlebar bag - I used to use that setup.

STI does fail  - and without warning - it happened to me on my cross Canada trip.

If you want the convience of STI on a touring bike, then at least carry a downtube/barcon shifter to adapt in an emergency.

Check out my experiences with STI on a tour...

http://www.adamk.ca/tourbike.htm

There's also a photo of the noodle set-up on the same page.



Adam K.
Sidney, BC Canada
Website: http://www.adamk.ca
Adam K.
Sidney, BC Canada
Website: http://www.adamk.ca

Offline tish

STI and handlebar bags
« Reply #10 on: January 22, 2004, 02:21:56 am »
You can use the small Cannondale handlebar with STI shifters with no modifications.  


Offline driftlessregion

STI and handlebar bags
« Reply #11 on: April 10, 2004, 12:50:17 am »
I answer my own question: I just put on the noodles and have about 150 miles on with them. They work great, my large Vaude bag fits fine, and I think the noodle adds a sleek silver look to the system. I'm very happy with them.


Offline JerrySSmith

STI and handlebar bags
« Reply #12 on: April 13, 2004, 09:23:48 pm »
We have two Co-Motions a Single and a Tandem The Tandem is about 6 months old... For me I love the bar-end shifters for touring... They are simple and easy to take care of..

Jerry S. Smith