Author Topic: Tires...  (Read 8252 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline mikeb

Tires...
« on: October 11, 2004, 05:11:07 pm »
Looking for some input on new tires for my touring rig. I have a Trek 520 and am looking for something in the 700 x 32 range.

I have Continental touring 700 x 28's on my commuter and am pleased so far with the performance.

I rarely ride in gravel (other than my driveway!) and try to stay on the pavement.


Offline JayH

Tires...
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2004, 11:46:24 am »
Is this the "top touring" Contis? I've heard that recommended before. If you are pleased with the 28s, does Conti make them in a 32?  Why not try those?

I tour and commute on my MTB so I have 26" wheels. I use a set of Avocet Cross II Kevlars which take 85psi in the 26x1.5" width.  I am happy with them commuting and touring, but Avocet tires are generally hard to find but I believe they do come in 700c and 26" diameters. Got mine from Performance.com so you might check them out if they carry them there...

Jay


Offline mikeb

Tires...
« Reply #2 on: October 13, 2004, 04:51:47 pm »
Top Touring they are...

Anyone using Schwalbe's?

and what about studded tires for winter? anyone commute in the snow and ice?


Offline JayH

Tires...
« Reply #3 on: October 13, 2004, 05:30:15 pm »
I do, I have a set of MTB Nokian tires, I believe the Mound and Ground 160s because I do a mixture of off and road winter cycling so the 160s are a mixture of having moderate studs and not as heavy as some of the off road tires.  

I've used them for one season and they are excellent in the hard pack and ice conditions they are made for. Not so well in the deep or soft snow as expected.

Jay


Offline burleyrider

Tires...
« Reply #4 on: October 13, 2004, 06:19:34 pm »
I love the Schwalbe Marathons. They are good for road riding and the occasional road less traveled.



- Derek

Derek

Offline TwoWheeledExplorer

  • World Traveler
  • *****
  • Posts: 302
  • "I am well, thank God, and in high spirits"
Tires...
« Reply #5 on: October 14, 2004, 12:46:06 pm »
I use WTB tires exclusively on my bikes, and would strongly suggest the WTB Allterrainasaurus. I use them on my ranger patrol bike, which I also use when helping out as an EMS bike medic in an urban setting. They are smooth-riding, quiet, yet I have also used them off-road repeatedly without any problems. They wear like iron and come in touring sizes, too! (I first saw them on Binachi Volpes about 5 years ago.)

Ride safe,
Hans

Hans Erdman, WEMT
Backcountry Trail Patrol-MN
www.trailpatrol.org
The Two-Wheeled Explorer: Ride the River
www.twowheeledexplorer.org
"Every person has a river to ride...you are to Ride the River."--Pr. Larry Christenson

Offline burleyrider

Tires...
« Reply #6 on: October 14, 2004, 06:32:55 pm »
Mike,

One other tire that I use on my back wheel is an awesome one as well: The Avocet Cross II. It has an inverted tread for low rolling resistance. Yet, the tread does a phenominal job on gravel. I highly recommend these. They have kevlar belted versions too. Those versions weigh a lot less than competitor's kevlar belted tires too.

Here's a link: Avocet Cross II Tires

And a pic:




Derek    :p

Derek

Offline alh

Tires...
« Reply #7 on: October 17, 2004, 04:58:01 pm »
Years ago I got a great suggestion for finding good touring tires: ask tandem riders what they are using. Tandems use the same size wheels as tour bikes, and load the tires far more.

Currently my tandem friends and I are using Panracer Pasella tires. They are available in many sizes, including 700x32C, and folding/non folding styles.


Offline burleyrider

Tires...
« Reply #8 on: October 18, 2004, 06:04:59 pm »
Quote
I use WTB tires exclusively on my bikes, and would strongly suggest the WTB Allterrainasaurus. I use them on my ranger patrol bike, which I also use when helping out as an EMS bike medic in an urban setting.


Those WTB tires look nice. (Incidentally so does that Trail Patrol Website - - very interesting!). But I have another obstacle and that is tire size.

I ride a recumbent. WTB do not make them in 20" tires. What I did today was order some Continental SportContact tires. They looking good for sport touring. Of course, I am not into any touring except for 2-3 days trips.

Derek :)

Derek

Offline Locorogue

Tires...
« Reply #9 on: November 19, 2004, 04:19:46 pm »
Continental "Town & Country's". I couldnt be happier. Smooth center tread, aggressive indented aggressive sidewalls for offroad and better aerodynamics, wide enough for shock absorption and handling on trails.





Offline RussellSeaton

Tires...
« Reply #10 on: December 07, 2004, 01:18:03 am »
My choice for touring tires is big, wide, and heavy.  And cheap.  Brand doesn't matter.  I've used Specialized Expedition for 3,000 miles on the back.  Cheng Shin something or the other on the front and back for about 7,000 miles.  Michelin Touring something for about 2,000.  IRC something in 38mm width for several thousand miles.  Currently using Specialized Nimbus I bought cheap.


Offline ATSFfan

Tires...
« Reply #11 on: December 08, 2004, 11:04:23 pm »
Another vote for Panaracer Pasellas. They wore very well, and are available with both Kevlar belts and Kevlar beads (foldable).

And definitely go with the 32's, I tried touring on 28's once and went through the rear tire in less than 500 miles. 32's wear much better - 1500-2000 miles on rear wheels fully loaded.

Richard Pace

This message was edited by ATSFfan on 12-8-04 @ 7:06 PM

Offline Dan

Tires...
« Reply #12 on: December 10, 2004, 06:49:22 pm »
Specialized makes tires in their Armadillo line that
are very tough, have bead to bead protection, and
are durable.  The tread pattern I've used is the
"Crossroads" (26 X 1.9).  It has a solid center strip
that makes smooth roads nice but has the large
side knobbies for off road.  I used these tires on
the GDMBR last summer (Starting in Antilope
Wells and continued riding to Jasper, Canada) and
had only 2 flats (both rear) over 3,200 pannier
loaded miles.  The flats came from a 1 inch nail
and razor sharp tiny rock around miles 1,200 and
1,250.  The front is still like new  while the rear
should be replaced.  A bit heavier than some tires
but the piece of mind in having a tire holding up is
well worth it.  I'd highly recommend them for any
sort of off road touring.  



Offline Peaks

Tires...
« Reply #13 on: December 10, 2004, 11:42:37 pm »
I'm sold on Armadillo's.  I had a new pair at the start of my cross country trip.  Got 1/2 way on the rear tire until it wore out.  Bought a replacement that is still one the bike.  The front tire went all the way, over 4500 miles.