Author Topic: Looking for a bike  (Read 2977 times)

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Offline Irish

Looking for a bike
« on: January 01, 2005, 11:56:24 am »
I'm looking to get into "fully-supported" touring.  I would like to get a bike that will last a long time and give me a good ride.  I've already posted on the General forum, but thought I would try here as well.

I know fit and comfort are the two biggest issues, but can you point me at some models to consider?  I've heard the names Trek and Jamis quite a bit.  What models would appear to be a good fit for my specific need (i.e. bikes I should try out)?  Cost is also definitely a factor.  Anything over $1500 means I'll have to put aside any tour goals until 2006, as we're also saving for a newer car this year.  

Thanks in advance for your help.



Offline Peaks

Looking for a bike
« Reply #1 on: January 01, 2005, 08:54:56 pm »
Comfort probably comes mostly from having a good pair of bike shorts, and a seat that agrees with your anatomy.

As far a fit goes, most bike frames come in different sizes, and handlbars can be raised, seats can be raised and adjusted, so that things fit.  

For fully supported touring, you will not be carrying much.  First, make a basic decision on what type of bike you want to buy:  Road, touring, or hybred.  Then look at the Trek or Cannondale line and figure out how much you want to spend.  They have bikes in a wide range of prices.   Obviously, if you spend more, you will get a better quality components.  But, it's cerainly possible to bike a long long ways without major problems with a modest priced bike.  I know, because that's what I have.


Offline LDiskin

Looking for a bike
« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2005, 04:08:25 pm »

For somebody that is new to road cycling, or hasn't done it in a while, comfort is the absolute number one most important factor to consider. It is also important to have the triple front chainring for climbing hills unless you are an experienced cyclist and relatively highly trained. Fortunately, there is a new(ish) frame design that allows for more comfort while also being sufficiently light weight and performance oriented. These types of bikes are right up your alley and what I recommend.

Two examples that run between $900-1100 are the Specialized Sequoia and the Trek Alpha 1200C. Check out their web sites and note that the design allows for the seat and handlebars to be approximately level with each other naturally. This creates a significantly more comfortable riding position than a typical racing bike without sacraficing much performance for the average rider.

If you get seriously into it a couple of years down the road, and want to get on something a little more racey, you'll always have the option of doing so. But if you purchase a racing bike right off the bat, you will likely end up modifying it to be more like the bikes I describe above anyway.

Happy shopping,
Larry Diskin - Adventure Cycling Association

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Larry Diskin
Adventure Cycling Association
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Larry Diskin
Adventure Cycling Association