Author Topic: Which type of mini stove?  (Read 11597 times)

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Offline staehpj1

Re: Which type of mini stove?
« Reply #15 on: February 02, 2009, 06:53:53 pm »
Here is the previous stove thread:

http://www.adventurecycling.org/forums/index.php?topic=5063.0
That thread said most of what I would add, but I will mention a few things.

On the TA we didn't find isobutane fuel from Pueblo Colorado until Kentucky and it wasn't easy to find there.  We stopped in dozens of places and wasted hours looking for it.  You can have someone mail it to you via general delivery (read the thread in the link above for postal requirements).

Regarding propane, both the stoves and the cartridges are too heavy to suit me.  They are readily available and rugged though.

Offline Westinghouse

Re: Which type of mini stove?
« Reply #16 on: February 03, 2009, 07:19:27 am »
Right now it looks like the alcohol stoves have it. All I know is mine works just fine for my on-the-road needs.

Offline SteveSgt

Re: Which type of mini stove?
« Reply #17 on: February 14, 2009, 12:10:50 am »
I'd like to suggest the Caldera cone alcohol stove:
http://www.traildesigns.com/

There's not a more efficient alcohol stove out there.

Offline indyfabz

Re: Which type of mini stove?
« Reply #18 on: February 19, 2009, 10:00:39 am »
I did AC's Northern Tier tour in '99.  We carried 3 Coleman Peaks that burned White Gas/Coleman fuel.  Never had a problem finding fuel, but it was mostly in big cans.  Since we had several bottles we could absorb that much.  Other makers of fuel sell 32 oz. quantities, but they can be harder to find.  But as someone noted, you can usually leave the remainder of a large can with someone, such as a campground, who will then dole it out to others.  Also, some outdoor stores have opened cans and will fill your bottle for a price.  In the end, white gas/Coleman fuel is not expensive, so if you have to leave some behind it won't brake your bank.

While the Peak (don't know what they are calling it these days) was reliable, I found it relatively unstable due to it's narrow footprint and it's relatively high center of gravity.

In the winter of '00 I toured in southern Spain using a jet that burned propane in cannisters.  I found the heat and burn time sorely lacking.

For Seattle to Cortez, CO that spring/summer I turned to the MSR Dragonfly and now never leave home without it.  Compact, very stable, very powerful and has a super-fine flame adjustment.  While it is fully field maintainable with the included maintenance kit tiny with essentially no noticeable weight), I have never had problems with the stove and I cook daily when I tour or backpack.  Major drawbacks are price and noise.  At full blast it sounds like a small jet engine.  But you usually don't have it on full for more tha 4-5 minutes.  Once the water begins boling you can turn it down and it's not unreasonably loud.  For slow cooking and simmering the flame adjustment is great.  Another drawback is that it is somewhat fuel hungry.  Making tea/coffee in the morning and cooking full dinner at night, I would get about 10-12 days out of a 22 oz. fuel bottle.  I will be doing the Whitefish-Waterton Lakes-Glacier loop in June with a companion.  My plan is to take along a 32 oz. fuel bottle just to be on the safe side.  For those worrying about space, remember that you can usually fit a fuel bottle into a water bottle holder on your bike.  The bottle cage under the down tube makes an excellent fuel bottle carrier.  If you screw the fuel pump securely onto the bottle you should not have a leakage problem.

Offline paddleboy17

Re: Which type of mini stove?
« Reply #19 on: February 19, 2009, 12:25:32 pm »
For those worrying about space, remember that you can usually fit a fuel bottle into a water bottle holder on your bike.  The bottle cage under the down tube makes an excellent fuel bottle carrier.  If you screw the fuel pump securely onto the bottle you should not have a leakage problem.

I have always toured with an MSR Whisperlite International, and my buddy uses an MSR Dragonfly.  Our experience with carrying a fuel bottle as you described had one important issue.  Grit can get into the pump connector and clog it up.   You might need to get a bootie of some kind made to cover up the pump mechanism.
Danno

Offline wildandcrazy

Re: Which type of mini stove?
« Reply #20 on: February 24, 2009, 11:23:44 am »
I don't know what stove is "best", but we use the "Jet Boil" system.  The advantages are:  Extremely fast - water to a full boil in less than three minutes.  Cooking pots are part of the system.  The fuel cannisters are very light weight, so you can carry extras at less weight than alternatives.  Simple to use.  Disadvantages:  More costly than some.  Fuel can be harder to find, although you can use other brands if they will attach.  Walmarts in our area have Coleman, which works.