Author Topic: Touring computer  (Read 5665 times)

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Offline bishop

Touring computer
« on: December 24, 2006, 11:13:19 am »
Hi Everyone:
Please excuse me if this topic is "old hat" but I'm hoping to do the
Northern Tier next summer and people seem to think I'd benefit from a
computer.  I try to be a minimalist (within reason) so any suggestions?  Of
course it'd have to be durable since I'll be camping a great deal, and
hopefully just basic and simple for practical purposes.

Thanks in advance,

Bill


Offline ptaylor

Touring computer
« Reply #1 on: December 24, 2006, 11:38:18 am »
Hi Bishop.

When you say 'touring computer', several things come to mind. Cyclocomputers come with a variety of features. The more features, the more expense and complexity.

Certainly, you need a unit with speed and distance. You can get these for about $20 or so.

You can also get units with cadence, heart rate monitoring, and power output (in watts). I have seen no need for these on a touring bike, although racers might find them worth the cost (up to $600 or so) and complexity.

You may also be thinking of a Global Positioning System (GPS) which tells you speed, distance, elevation and a bunch of other information, for $100 - $500. If you're thinking of a GPS, you may want to post a question under that topic in this forum

Paul
Paul

Offline bishop

Touring computer
« Reply #2 on: December 24, 2006, 05:20:46 pm »
Thanks Paul:

Yeah...I'm not sure if a GPS is ACTUALLY what I need?  A couple people
suggested having something to use to see "if I can make it there by dark".  
So I'm thinking DISTANCES would be the main reason.  But I'm clueless to
this kind of equipment, hence the post!  Appreciate your feedback.

Bill


Offline RussellSeaton

Touring computer
« Reply #3 on: December 24, 2006, 07:38:31 pm »
I use and like CatEye wired computers.  Enduro or Mity.  $20-25.  Astrale has cadence.  $35.  I think computers are very useful because you can see signs saying a town is 10 miles away and know when you get there by your computer mileage.  Or if you ride 12 miles and no town, you probably know you took a wrong turn somewhere.  On various rides you are given a cue sheet saying when to turn and their will be the number of miles until the next turn.  Its nice to know when to start looking for a turn based on what your computer says.  Helps to avoid getting lost.


Offline DaveB

Touring computer
« Reply #4 on: December 24, 2006, 08:09:27 pm »
I use and like CatEye wired computers.  Enduro or Mity.  $20-25.

We certainly agree on this.  I have Cat-Eye Mity and Enduro cyclocomputers (same computer but a heavier gauge wire) on six of my own bikes and friends and family have them on a dozen more.  They've been ultra reliable and the batteries last for years.  Very good choice.


Offline ptaylor

Touring computer
« Reply #5 on: December 25, 2006, 09:42:12 am »
Bill.
You may want t take a look at REI's offerings. They have a pretty good selection, and they have a link to 'how to choose a cyclometer'.

Paul
Paul

Offline bishop

Touring computer
« Reply #6 on: December 25, 2006, 08:10:52 pm »
Thanks so much for the useful feedback.  

Bill


Offline fleutz

Touring computer
« Reply #7 on: December 26, 2006, 10:46:10 pm »
I swear by Cateye "Wireless" computers because wired units had tendency short out on long rides. So I switched and it works like a dream.

And That's All There Is !
And That's All There Is !

Offline Raine

Touring computer
« Reply #8 on: December 28, 2006, 05:48:25 am »
I've noticed that most cyclocomputer brands have several models available, with very little (5-20$) price diffrences between them.

I did the mistake taking the cheapest one, which records only speed and overall distance, but it does not have trip distance (very useful when touring) and I would also have liked to see maximum speed.


Offline litespeed

Touring computer
« Reply #9 on: January 05, 2007, 11:16:45 am »
As RussellSeaton says, a cyclo computer lets you know if you've made a wrong turn. On those long, lonely stretches of road it is very reassuring to know how far you've gone and how far to go to the next town. I can't imagine traveling without my cyclocomputer. I've never used anything but Cateye Mity's and, except for occasionally having to clean the contacts, have never had any trouble with them. I've never had a broken wire and the batteries last forever. But make sure you bring the instruction sheet with you. They can be tricky to set.
I also suggest a little field compass. This will also tell you if you've made a wrong turn.

This message was edited by litespeed on 1-5-07 @ 7:18 AM

Offline RussellSeaton

Touring computer
« Reply #10 on: January 05, 2007, 12:09:42 pm »
"I also suggest a little field compass. This will also tell you if you've made a wrong turn."

Agree.  When touring with my Cannondale handlebar bag my Silva compass sits on top of the map inside the plastic map case.  Its kept me on the right track more than once.  When you know the town you are heading for is north of the town where you started, and the roads on the map all run fairly straight north-south, and your compass shows you going south, its time to stop and figure out where you are.