Author Topic: trekking handlebars  (Read 8894 times)

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Offline hotrod

trekking handlebars
« on: February 12, 2007, 11:46:04 am »
Thinking of replacing my flat mt bike handlebars with trekking bars or mustache bars that have multi positions.

anyone have any experience with these bars

Gary


Offline wanderingwheel

trekking handlebars
« Reply #1 on: February 13, 2007, 05:16:45 pm »
I've got an old set of Scott wrap-around handlebars.  They are not quite what you are looking for but close.  It is nice to have the tons of positions they offer, including a mock aerobar.  I especially like the second flat bar position "way out there" when I want to stretch my back a little.  Placing a handlebar bag or map on the bars is basically impossible, and lights are only slightly easier to mount.

Sean


Offline hotrod

trekking handlebars
« Reply #2 on: February 13, 2007, 09:42:22 pm »
Hi Sean

Are the scott bars still availabe
if not, is there a similar handlebar to the scott other than the two I mentioned.

Gary


Offline wanderingwheel

trekking handlebars
« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2007, 11:06:38 pm »
I finally found the name of the bars I have: Scott AT-4 Pro.  They've been out of production for probably 10 years now so ebay is about your only chance to find a set.  A little bit of searching turned up this: http://joinomba.org/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=5399  The closest thing I've seen to them are butterfly bars.  Another, if pricey, option is the Jones H-bar.

Sean


Offline hotrod

trekking handlebars
« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2007, 11:01:23 am »
Thanks Sean

Took a look at site
Will send email to check out

Thanks again

Gary


Offline bruno

trekking handlebars
« Reply #5 on: February 15, 2007, 11:36:24 am »
i have the nitto mustache bars on one of my bikes--a fixed gear i ride around town in good weather(as it's my pimped out "sunday" bike). i put them on for looks and really like them. but i notice that for anything over say 40 miles at a stretch they tend to make my hands a little numb. and mounting a handlebar bag is difficult (at least my carradice bag).

that being said, i have nitto ergo drop bars on my long distance bike (a ti IF club racer). very comfortable as the frame was made to measure for me and the fit was dialed in by a serotta trained fitter here in boston. this bike disappears under me. and the bag fits perfectly (i have a campy cockpit--the shimano looks to me to be a little problematic in that the cables would seem to get in the way).

on a 29 inch mtb i recently had built up for a trip to southeast asia i have nitto albatross bars. very comfortable. i haven't yet put a handlebar bag on, but it looks like i can rig something. i played around with stem lengths and just about have it the way i want it. more of an upright ride.

the "trekking" bars i don't like the looks of (there's just too much out there) and that's kind of important to me.

for me the traditional drop bar or "raleigh" type bars work best for long days in the saddle.


Offline hotrod

trekking handlebars
« Reply #6 on: February 17, 2007, 09:30:17 am »
Hi Bruno

I really don't like the look of the trekking bars myself but thought the numerous hand positions make sense.

I've been looking at the Rivendell bicycle site (good information plus common sense opinions) and the albatross bars look inviting.

Your suggestion regarding raleigh type bars is interesting since I also ride an older Raleigh sprite and find these handlebars comfortable.

Thanks for the suggestions.

Gary


Offline driftlessregion

trekking handlebars
« Reply #7 on: February 19, 2007, 11:09:21 pm »
I love my Nitto mustache bars for around town but on long tours it has fewer position options, no drops for instance. Mustache has the advantage of greater braking power than on the tops of the STI hoods, and using bar end shifters or down tube shifters you always have friction mode in case the indexing goes awry.
For handlebar bags with Shimano STI I use something I think is called noodles which rerout the cables down and away from the bag.


Offline bktourer1

trekking handlebars
« Reply #8 on: February 20, 2007, 08:01:37 am »
I have a pair from Nashbar and they work great for me.
If you use an bar mirror, the standard ones won't work.  I ended up getting the Zefal "SPY" mirror.
Depending on what bar bag you use, there might not be enough room to mount one.  Cover the bars with a wrap and you will have several different positions for you hands.


Offline hotrod

trekking handlebars
« Reply #9 on: February 23, 2007, 11:43:04 pm »
Thanks for the suggestion.
Looked at the Nashbar mustache bars and think I'll go with them.

Gary


Offline BostonMc

trekking handlebars
« Reply #10 on: March 07, 2007, 09:24:02 pm »
I had the Scott AT-4 bars a bunch of years ago and put a bunch of touring miles on with them, loved them. The brace really works well for a sort of aero position. I found a set on ebay here:

http://tinyurl.com/35yd3v

If I ever tour on a MTB again I would go find a set of these. Love 'em.

As I recall I did figure out a way to hang a bag from the middle front where I kept my camera and passport etc. I think I spread the break/shift levers and had it hang from the middle.


tofubicycle

  • Guest
trekking handlebars
« Reply #11 on: March 07, 2007, 11:38:43 pm »
I just wanted to comment on the aforementioned Jones H-Bar. While it's true that Jeff Jones will charge you $250 for the his titanium handlebar, he has arranged a mass-produced version of the H-B to be made by Titec. The Titec version is made of aluminum, and is very similar in shape to the original H-Bar except that the center bar is essentially a riser bar, where as the original H-Bar is straight. The Titec version should run you between $80 and $90 at your LBS.

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i'd rather be biking.

Offline roadrunner71

trekking handlebars
« Reply #12 on: March 16, 2007, 07:31:06 pm »
I put trekking bars on my k2 full suspension mtb, and love them. Here is the name: Nashbar Trekking ATB/Hybrid Handlebar (website: www.bikenashbar.com)
Roger