Author Topic: Bike recommendation (under 1200 dollars US)  (Read 3399 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline NCjohn

Bike recommendation (under 1200 dollars US)
« on: June 08, 2007, 08:09:27 am »
I plan to start riding twice a week with a local club, about 30 miles per trip, gentle rolling hills in central NC.  Hope to prepare for annual trips in the future such as supported tours of BlueRidge Parkway and other hilly, scenic areas.  I am not a racer and do not want to be uncomfortable but still want to be able to ride efficiently.  I would love to hear from folks on their recommendations for a new ride.  Thanks much.  I am 5,11, 168 lbs, 43 y/o male.


Offline RussellSeaton

Bike recommendation (under 1200 dollars US)
« Reply #1 on: June 08, 2007, 02:38:10 pm »
Sounds like you need to find a bike shop first.  Hopefully there are good ones in your area.  Talk to some of the people in the club you plan to ride with and figure out the preferred bike shop.  Go there and buy a bike.  Almost any bike sold by bike shops is OK.  Decent fit is desirable of course.  At 5'11", you would probably be on a 58 cm center to top frame.  I'm a similar height and ride 58 cm center to top or 59 cm center to top.  Subtract a couple centimeters to get a center to center seattube measurement.  Top tube length will be 57 cm, give or take a half centimeter.  So any compact style frames you look at, you will need to look at the geometry chart and see if the effective top tube length is about 57 cm.  Assuming you are not abnormally shaped and not injured somehow, a bike size I describe above will be a good fit.  Minor tweaks with the stem, handlebars can easily be made.



"I am not a racer and do not want to be uncomfortable but still want to be able to ride efficiently."

Based on your comments you presume a racing bike is going to be uncomfortable.  Always amazes me that people always have this incorrect presumption.  They don't know what bike to buy or what will fit them, but they always know a racing bike will be uncomfortable.


Offline Sailariel

Bike recommendation (under 1200 dollars US)
« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2007, 01:11:09 pm »
Russell, I don`t know where the notion of racing bikes being uncomfortable came from--I suffered from that misinformation until recently. I have just finished building a bike from a handmade pro racing frame. I can`t begin to explain how comfortable and responsive that "new bike" is. It is a whole new dimension.


Offline WetDogRider

Bike recommendation (under 1200 dollars US)
« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2007, 12:34:35 pm »
Hi Russell
I look up to your riding , but find it hard to push building a custom bike . . . . Its above and beyond throwing a pair of wheels, on a frame , and off you go for a ride . Finding the proper gear for your bike is the most important part , and being able to afford those goodies is another story . Thats why I'm stuck with buying mine from the local dept. store and hoping I'll have a good bike , that will bring me miles of enjoyment .I just got my second bike . A hybrid Scwinn , and am hoping it will last longer than the first ( 2 weeks ).Thank God for those dept store bike mechanics . Throw the parts on the bike and hell with the adjustments . Thank You Tx*#et!
Is that proper ? I didn't use their full name . . .    


Offline TCS

Bike recommendation (under 1200 dollars US)
« Reply #4 on: June 21, 2007, 02:36:47 pm »
Hey, NCJohn!

Given your inputs, I'd suggest start by looking at bikes like Cannondale Synapses, Giant OCRs, Raleigh Cadents, Specialized Sequoias, and Trek Pilots.

HTH,
Tom

"My name is Pither.  I am at present on a cycling tour of the North Cornwall area taking in Bude and..."

Offline timmbo

Bike recommendation (under 1200 dollars US)
« Reply #5 on: June 21, 2007, 08:32:45 pm »
Don't neglect shopping used bikes.  I got my touring bike on craigslist.


Offline Bikinchris

Bike recommendation (under 1200 dollars US)
« Reply #6 on: June 22, 2007, 10:48:07 am »
Having a qualified bike fitter carefully fit the bike to you (for your intended use and comfort)is much more important than the label the bike has on it (racing, touring etc.)
You actually have a generous budget, so that's not a problem. If you shop for a bike with sensible and durable frame and components, you will find a great bike. Don't be afraid to pay for a sizing and use the information to look for a used bike either.
The trick is finding a good shop. North Carolina does have some good ones, but some of them are more tuned to the ultimate racing fit instead of finding a comfortable, efficient position. I would suggest looking up the Fit Kit site
http://bikefitkit.com/
and shopping the listed shops in your area.
http://bikefitkit.com/store_locator/north_carolina.php
 The process of finding a good shop is really worth the trouble- you will find good information there as well as good product.

This message was edited by Bikinchris on 6-22-07 @ 6:49 AM

Offline DaveB

Bike recommendation (under 1200 dollars US)
« Reply #7 on: June 28, 2007, 01:22:25 pm »
Quote
Thats why I'm stuck with buying mine from the local dept. store and hoping I'll have a good bike , that will bring me miles of enjoyment .I just got my second bike . A hybrid Scwinn , and am hoping it will last longer than the first ( 2 weeks )....


This is a good illustration of the saying; "Only a rich man can afford cheap tools."  Buy cheap and you will not only get poor service, you will have to replace it very soon.  Good money after bad.

There is no reason to buy the most expensive bike but always buy quality.  The OP's original budget is well within the high-quality range.

I certainly agree with Russell Seaton.  I also don't understand why new cyclists with no experience always assume a "racing" (i.e., any drop bar) bike will be uncomfortable.  For long rides they are much more comfortable and efficient.


Offline driftlessregion

Bike recommendation (under 1200 dollars US)
« Reply #8 on: July 06, 2007, 10:07:14 pm »
Let's not confuse the issue by saying that drop bars equals racing bikes.
 Most people find that for long days in the saddle touring a racing bike with its shorter wheelbase, and narrower, harder tires is not as comfortable as a touring bike. A touring bike affords riders the option of not bending over as much which is easier on our backs. Try to get the bars even with the saddle on a newer racing bike. I've never seen someone buy a touring bike complain about comfort, but lots of people who buy racing frames who are uncomfortable, especially the older rider (I'm 55 and that means me). Fit, fit, fit, touring frame or not is the key. FitKit is fine but a real pro can do it just as well by watching you ride on a trainer and asking you what kind of riding you do.


Offline Bikinchris

Bike recommendation (under 1200 dollars US)
« Reply #9 on: August 01, 2007, 10:00:08 pm »
My mention of the Fit Kit was only as a starting point. Sure, many goo dfitters don't have to have one to fit you to an existing bike, but it's a good starting point for a new bike, like the OP wanted.