Author Topic: clip-in pedals  (Read 6546 times)

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Offline HONDO

clip-in pedals
« on: July 24, 2007, 11:27:58 am »
Im still using stirrup type pedals on both my touring and mountain bike.Everyone is trying to convince me to switch to clip-in.Im a hard sell but Im willing to listen.Experience,advice appreciated.


Offline JimF

clip-in pedals
« Reply #1 on: July 24, 2007, 01:44:56 pm »
I've had very good performance from Speedplay Frog pedals. They are a MTB design, but work wonderfully for touring (lots of on and off the bike during the day). They imbed in MTB/touring shoes (I love Shimano's sandals BTW), thus you don't loudly announce your entry into every establishment. Most important: they offer easy release, plenty of float, simple design, easy maintenance.


Offline meaculpa

clip-in pedals
« Reply #2 on: July 24, 2007, 10:27:38 pm »
"I've had very good performance from Speedplay Frog pedals. They are a MTB design, but work wonderfully for touring (lots of on and off the bike during the day). They imbed in MTB/touring shoes (I love Shimano's sandals BTW), thus you don't loudly announce your entry into every establishment."

Well, I've heard the opposite...
This is what a few lbs have said:
The cleats do not imbed into MTB shoes, they need road shoes - unless you're willing to cut up the soles of MTB shoes which is not reccomended. They also require little rubber caps for walking & still will mess with your stepping normally.


Offline JayH

clip-in pedals
« Reply #3 on: July 25, 2007, 09:20:59 am »
The Speeplay Frogs is a MTB pedal with SPD compatible cleats, they'll work with any SPD mtb shoe, although since they are a wide cleat platform, I have heard folks needing to modify the sole of the MTB shoe.

The Speedplay X series is their road-designed pedal similar to design of the Frog, just made for weight weenies and less mud.  

Having said that, I prefer the TIME ATAC series pedals, the cleat is small, no modifications needed that I've ever heard of. Same ease of entry but the Frogs may have a little more float if that makes ya happy.

I've ridden 25k miles in my Times on the same shoes and cleats, needless to day, I'm very happy with mine. I have 3 sets of them, 1 on a MTB commuter, 1 on a road bike commuter and one on my full on MTB. I have Speedplay X1s on a road bike and a set of Eggbeaters on another. The ATACs are my favorite.

Jay


Offline JimF

clip-in pedals
« Reply #4 on: July 25, 2007, 01:38:17 pm »
Speaking from actual experience vs. some LBS' who may carry other brands, I've used the Frog for over four years--including a TransAm--in both SPD sandals and MTB shoes with no modification. I'm sure there are a number of worthy clip-ins besides Frogs. Just my opinion and experience.


Offline CNC2006

clip-in pedals
« Reply #5 on: July 25, 2007, 03:08:40 pm »
Hondo,
Good for you for being open minded about clipless, once you get used to it, you will wonder how you ever did without! Power and control baby!

Personal experience, have used Look, Shimano-type SPD's and eggbeaters.  

Loved the Look, but lousy for touring if you want to get off the bike and walk around.  (Does, however, give you a great hamstring stretch!)

Eggbeaters seem to be easiest to get into, SPD's easiest to get out of.

If I may make a suggestion, you can get the SPD's and Eggbeaters for around $50 at several discount bike shops.  And a little more for Mountain Bike shoes (Best for tourers because they have a real sole the clip is recessed into) if your present shoes aren't clipless compatible.

So for $100 and change, you are started.  Put 'em on and dink around the parking lot clipping in and out of them.  Take a allen wrench to tighten or loosen (if 2 sided, make sure you adjust both sides!)

Then, try a ride.  Click in and out more than usual just to get used to it. Then as you are riding, concentrate on pulling UP! to get full power.

Don't worry about falling. ('Cause you're gonna!)  Usually doesn't happen until you get cocky about them.  I fell over last year when I tried to PULL out instead of twisting.  And I haven't used toeclips in 20+ years! But, remember, falls are almost always at low speed, and it really isn't that far to the ground.

Anyway, good luck and keep us apprised how it's going!
Cameron



Offline valygrl

clip-in pedals
« Reply #6 on: July 25, 2007, 03:16:12 pm »
I'll add a +1 on the speedplay frog + shimano sandal combo.  my friend used the eggbeaters/sandal combo, and was happy too.  the frog cleats do wear rather quickly, though, and can be a little hard to find, so i carry a spare set when touring.

it's quite good on the mountain bike too, that's where i started out with the frogs.  easy to get out of, lots of float.  clogs up a bit with mud, though.


Offline HONDO

clip-in pedals
« Reply #7 on: July 25, 2007, 04:26:27 pm »
Sounds like I had better head over to my trusted LBS and see what he has.So far Im convinced I need a shoe I can jump off the bike with and hike up a trail if IF feel the need. thanks everybody


Offline roadrunner

clip-in pedals
« Reply #8 on: July 27, 2007, 01:32:48 am »
To add a different perspective to your pedal question, my preference is the "old fashioned" cage pedal and Power Grip straps.  I use them on my touring, mountain, and around-town bikes.  The advantages for me are:
a. I can ride in any type shoes - cycling, tennies, sandals, street shoes, or hiking shoes.
b. The staps hold the foot as securely to the pedal as clip-ins and are easy to get out of.
d. No need to carry another pair of shoes on tours for walking, hanging around the camp site, etc.
e. For a quick ride, there's no need to switch to special shoes.
f. I can walk through dirt or mud without having to clean out cleats.

I attached thin metal plates to the pedals of a couple of my bikes, making a platform pedal for riding comfortably with thin-soled shoes or sandals.

Riding without clip-ins is certainly possible -- it was done for more than a hundred years.


Offline DaveB

clip-in pedals
« Reply #9 on: July 27, 2007, 11:39:45 pm »
"I've had very good performance from Speedplay Frog pedals. They are a MTB design, but work wonderfully for touring (lots of on and off the bike during the day). They imbed in MTB/touring shoes (I love Shimano's sandals BTW), thus you don't loudly announce your entry into every establishment."

Well, I've heard the opposite...
This is what a few lbs have said:
The cleats do not imbed into MTB shoes, they need road shoes - unless you're willing to cut up the soles of MTB shoes which is not reccomended. They also require little rubber caps for walking & still will mess with your stepping normally.


Frogs are indeed "MTB" pedals and use recessed cleats just like Shimano SPD's, Time Atacs, etc. I've used them on road bikes for well over 60,000 miles and have them on three bikes right now. They are light, double sided, easy to enter and exit and have plenty of float. They do not need protective caps and walking in them is quite normal.  

That said, while they are wonderful road pedals, they are not good MTB pedals.  The cleats are prone to clog in loose conditions and won't let you clip in.  I've had them jam with mud, ice and gravel so they are not really suited for heavy-duty off-road
use.  The up-side is that they never refuse to release so you can't be trapped.

This message was edited by DaveB on 7-27-07 @ 7:41 PM

Offline dombrosk

clip-in pedals
« Reply #10 on: August 04, 2007, 11:50:06 am »
I made the switch to SPD pedals a few years ago, and have not fallen-- at least because of the pedals ;-)

To ease my worries about the transition I got Shimano pedals that have the clip in on one side and a regular flat platform on the other side.

It's turned out to be the best of both worlds having "reversible" pedals.  The clip on side seems to naturally float to the top, which is good because when I have bike shoes on I always clip in.  For me being clipped in makes me feel much more stable and secure on the bike.  Riding in the rain is a whole different feeling, and it's nice to be able to pull the pedal up into position when stopped at a traffic light.

But I use my bike for my primary transportation, and  don't want to put bike shoes on to run to the library or the  grocery store.  That's when the other side of the pedal comes in handy.  It's also nice on tour when I've switched into my camp sandals and want to get on my bike.

The best piece of advice I got was to realize that you can adjust the  tension of the SPD clip-ins very easily with an Allen wrench.  Some bike shop mechanics who focus on performance riding might tighten the clips up to prevent accidentally coming out of the pedal.  I like mine loose instead-- I'd rather pop out unexpectedly than be unable to get out quickly when I wish.

Happy riding and have fun with whatever pedals you try!


Offline jkg188

clip-in pedals
« Reply #11 on: September 24, 2007, 12:34:45 am »
Have you made the switch to clipless pedals? I am looking into pedals for a new bike and haven't tried clipless yet. Thinking I might hold off after reading this article, though I know many people love the clipless setup.

http://www.rivbike.com/article/clothing/the_shoes_ruse


Offline HONDO

clip-in pedals
« Reply #12 on: September 24, 2007, 09:28:07 am »
Im still using the stirrups.Honestly I like being able to jump off the bike in the shoes I prefer that day.Im not saying its better or that I wont switch eventually but this system works for me.


Offline DaveB

clip-in pedals
« Reply #13 on: September 24, 2007, 11:53:15 pm »
Im still using the stirrups.Honestly I like being able to jump off the bike in the shoes I prefer that day.Im not saying its better or that I wont switch eventually but this system works for me.
Once you finally try clipless pedals you'll kick yourself for not having done it sooner.  ;)

I personally would much rather carry an extra pair of shoes on the bike than go without clipless pedals.


Offline linkbeak

clip-in pedals
« Reply #14 on: September 25, 2007, 12:31:00 am »
I was having trouble with my toes going numb after about an hour on the bike.  I was using SPDs on MTB shoes.  I switched to road shoes and Look pedals because the contact area for the foot is larger and the bottom of the shoe is firmer and my problem went away.  I find the Looks easy to get in and out of but definitely not walking friendly.

Around town and on a tour when I know I'll be on and off the bike a lot, I like the "campus pedal" I got at Performance Bike.  It is SPD on one side and a platform on the other.  Great for riding on the bike path or in traffic.  These pedals also accomodate toe clips.