Author Topic: Rear Derailleur  (Read 3496 times)

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Offline jimbeard

Rear Derailleur
« on: October 26, 2007, 08:01:09 pm »
Need advice on Rear Derailleur.
The jockey pulleys on Shimano XTR need replacing [teeth are worn to points ]went to LBS $35 each for new ones . A quick check on Net.$18 each but only top pully is available.
Nashbar has a complete Shimano Deore Rear Derailleur on sale for $18
I would like something durable for touring .
 Has any one had experiences with Deore ? Any suggestions appreciated.

Jim
Jim

Offline Badger

Rear Derailleur
« Reply #1 on: October 27, 2007, 02:12:17 am »
I had a deore rear on my mountain bike and got years out of it with very little problem.  Some one told me that XTR means race componets and they are a little lighter over all.  They use to make a DX and a XT but I don't remember what the difference was. I don't think you will have a problem using the pulleys on the Deore.  Hope that helps  Jim


Offline jimbeard

Rear Derailleur
« Reply #2 on: October 27, 2007, 11:06:10 am »
Thanks
I will try a Deore [@$18 vs $50+ for new pulleys] as i am not really concerned about a couple of grams of weight.
If i remember right i only paid $50 or $60 for the whole XTR derailleur a few years ago.

Jim
Jim

Offline bogiesan

Rear Derailleur
« Reply #3 on: October 27, 2007, 11:21:23 am »
Just be sure the new one has the same cage clearance as the one you're
replacing. Couple of different sizes depending on your biggest cog. Many
touring bikes have larger lows.

Assuming you take better care of the rest of your rig than you did your
rear mech, replacing the whole thing is definitely the better idea.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."
I play go. I use Macintosh. Of course I ride a recumbent

Offline jimbeard

Rear Derailleur
« Reply #4 on: October 27, 2007, 12:04:55 pm »
Your Quote"Assuming you take better care of the rest of your rig than you did your
rear mech, replacing the whole thing is definitely the better idea"

I thought i did take good care of my bicycle ,clean &lube every 200 miles Etc . I would guess these pulleys have at least 15,000 maybe 20,000 miles .
Should i expect better mileage than this?
Any suggestions for better mileage on components?


Jim
Jim

Offline JayH

Rear Derailleur
« Reply #5 on: October 27, 2007, 12:33:43 pm »
That seems like a lot of miles on them.  I seem to replace my pulleys a lot more, being a all weather commuter, it seams the pulleys go fairly fast and then all of them get a lot of crud in them, despite whatever claims of being "sealed" etc.  All they seem to have, at least the Shimano ones are a thin aluminum cover that doesn't do much in terms of keeping sand and crap in the bearings.  And I get lazy in regreasing them everytime it rains on my commute.  I remember, I bought I think Cane Creek pulleys once that were like a brushed Aluminum and a spiffy red color...

Jay


Offline jimbeard

Rear Derailleur
« Reply #6 on: October 27, 2007, 01:04:34 pm »
 Here in the Northeast salt used on roads is tough on bikes ,consequently i use a beater bike from first salt to last salt. Some times it feels like i spend more time cleaning the salt off as i do riding.

Jim
Jim

Offline whittierider

Rear Derailleur
« Reply #7 on: October 29, 2007, 02:52:47 am »
Is there a problem with the operation of the derailleur?  I think it was Huret, the French manufacturer, who used to make their derailleur pulleys with no teeth at all 30 years ago-- just plain round.  I have a Campagnolo derailleur about that old with 20,000 miles on it and its plastic pulleys do not look worn at all.  The problem I've had with the newer Ultegra derailleurs however is that it's hard to keep the upper ceramic sleeve bearing turning freely.  I've tried different oils and greases every time I've cleaned it out and re-lubed, but they quickly get very stiff compared to the ones with metal sleeves like the DeOre LX's we have from a few years ago.  The solution I have resorted to was to get the Performance pulleys with the ball bearings, and put in a little more thin grease than they come with.  I think the shifting is not quite as good, but those things spin very freely.  They're on sale right now for $13 for the pair.  You can see them at http://www.performancebike.com/shop/Profile.cfm?SKU=19852&item=50-3013&slitrk=search&slisearch=true

This message was edited by whittierider on 10-29-07 @ 1:33 AM

Offline jimbeard

Rear Derailleur
« Reply #8 on: October 29, 2007, 10:35:34 am »
WR-Thanks for the information on Performance pulleys.
Just ordered a set.
" Is there a problem with the operation of the derailleur? "
ans-No problem yet . It is almost time for winter tear down ,maintenance and worn  parts replacement.
 I may [being frugal]have brought this wear on myself ,tried to run chain as long as possible in this case 3,700 miles instead of the recommended 2,000 miles .
The saying "Pay me now or pay me later " proves true.


Jim
Jim

Offline JayH

Rear Derailleur
« Reply #9 on: October 29, 2007, 10:57:51 am »
Anybody else kind of wonder why most pulleys seem to be advertised or printed "sealed" on it, when all you seem to need to do to see the bushings is flip off the little aluminum cover to them.  They are the source of some incessant squeeking! But then again, as a commuter, I kind of leave them be, figure they at least allow the dog walkers to hear me coming without resorting to a bell or a "on your left" kind of shout.. ;)

Jay


Offline jimbeard

Rear Derailleur
« Reply #10 on: October 30, 2007, 12:55:13 pm »
Some do use ball bearings .
A couple of good maintenance tips here.
http://www.nmts.org/techTips.htm

Jim
Jim

Offline staehpj1

Rear Derailleur
« Reply #11 on: October 30, 2007, 02:53:19 pm »
> I may [being frugal]have brought this wear on myself, tried to run chain as long as possible in this case 3,700 miles instead of the recommended 2,000 miles.

I am curious about that recommendation.  Where does it come from.  I have never changed a chain at anywhere near that interval.  Some have lasted many times that distance.

I always have relied on measuring the chain as recommended by Sheldon Brown.

According to Sheldon Brown:
"Measuring Chain Wear

    The standard way to measure chain wear is with a ruler or steel tape measure. This can be done without removing the chain from the bicycle. The normal technique is to measure a one-foot length, placing an inch mark of the ruler exactly in the middle of one rivet, then looking at the corresponding rivet 12 complete links away. On a new, unworn chain, this rivet will also line up exactly with an inch mark. With a worn chain, the rivet will be past the inch mark.

    This gives a direct measurement of the wear to the chain, and an indirect measurement of the wear to the sprockets:

        * If the rivet is less than 1/16" past the mark, all is well.

        * If the rivet is 1/16" past the mark, you should replace the chain, but the sprockets are probably undamaged.

        * If the rivet is 1/8" past the mark, you have left it too long, and the sprockets (at least the favorite ones) will be too badly worn. If you replace a chain at the 1/8" point, without replacing the sprockets, it may run OK and not skip, but the worn sprockets will cause the new chain to wear much faster than it should, until it catches up with the wear state of the sprockets.

        * If the rivet is past the 1/8" mark, a new chain will almost certainly skip on the worn sprockets, especially the smaller ones."