Author Topic: Touring Stove  (Read 27858 times)

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Offline Westinghouse

Touring Stove
« Reply #45 on: December 26, 2008, 11:33:08 am »
Bogiesan is absolutely correct is his evaluation. You must first consider your tour, your terrain, your volume of cooking needs, and temperatures before making a decision on which stove to use. The original question was general in nature, and my expressed opinion was intended to be general.

Any of the stoves named here would be ok---depending. If the alcohol stove is adequate for your needs, and weight is a consideration, it might be your best  choice. As for myself, I buy food in grocery stores, and eat in restaurants. I have used stoves quite a bit, but not so much in the past few years.

Paddleboy17 really got into the alcohol stove suggestion.

This message was edited by Westinghouse on 12-28-08 @ 4:51 AM

Offline bogiesan

Touring Stove
« Reply #46 on: December 29, 2008, 10:00:04 pm »
Hope future seekers will find this thread and read all the way through. I
recently came across this fascinating take on the classic alcohol stove:

http://www.csun.edu/~mjurey/penny.html

By pressurizing the alcohol reservoir, efficiency is dramatically
improved. You will need a windscreen. Heck, every stove needs a
screen.

bogiesan



go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."
I play go. I use Macintosh. Of course I ride a recumbent

Offline Westinghouse

Re: Touring Stove
« Reply #47 on: February 20, 2009, 01:17:27 am »
Bogiesan:

I was just reading your information on the penny stove. I am going to make one, or maybe a few. Most cyclists who are into touring should see that article.

Offline mucknort

Re: Touring Stove
« Reply #48 on: February 20, 2009, 09:28:21 am »
The Coleman Exponent fits most of your stated requirements, cheap ($60), multifuel (white gas, unleaded, kerosene), and burns hot. Simple, one piece design is nice too. The flame adusts really low for keeping stuff warm. I've never had a problem with mine.
http://www.amazon.com/Coleman-550B725-Exponent-Multi-Fuel-Stove/dp/B0009VC7QK/ref=sr_1_49?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&qid=1235139387&sr=8-49

Offline IndyPat

Re: Touring Stove
« Reply #49 on: February 24, 2009, 10:32:57 pm »
I saw some plastic bottled Coleman White Gas that were about 1 qt.  More expensive than the cost per qt of the gal Coleman White Gas can.  In the past, I have bought gas from local campers, some would just fill your bottle.  An other way was to buy the can and then share with the others at the first night camping or the sales reps at the store who camp.

Offline AZ Rider

Re: Touring Stove
« Reply #50 on: February 26, 2009, 09:45:03 pm »
I use an MSR Dragonfly.....it's great because it is a multi-fuel stove, and is
ok to take anywhere in the world due to that versatility. I have used
white gas, kerosene, Stoddard solvent, etc, and never a problem with it.

Offline dunedigger

Re: Touring Stove
« Reply #51 on: March 01, 2009, 10:54:38 pm »
You could always try a solar stove, they are super light, no fuel required, and easy to DIY. Only problem is that its a slow cooker, kinda like a crock-pot. Here is a link to the one I'm gonna try out . . .

http://solarcooking.org/plans/windshield-cooker.htm

and a nice article on solar cooking . . .

http://www.thecleanestline.com/2008/09/solar-cookin.html


Offline Westinghouse

Re: Touring Stove
« Reply #52 on: March 03, 2009, 08:16:04 am »
Solar cooking has been around for quite a while. Of course, you still need fuel, the sun, and if it isn't cooking it isn't cooking. What about those Sierra stoves with the small electric fan in the bottom. I heard they worked just fine. But look at the stove and look at the price. Somthing to me looks way out of kilter. I mean, you could cut a hole near the bottom of a coffee can, jet air in with one of those small, battery operated, horizontal fans, and have the same thing for a very small fraction of the price, and it would weigh a lot less too.

Offline staehpj1

Re: Touring Stove
« Reply #53 on: March 03, 2009, 08:43:20 am »
You could always try a solar stove, they are super light, no fuel required, and easy to DIY. Only problem is that its a slow cooker, kinda like a crock-pot. Here is a link to the one I'm gonna try out . . .

http://solarcooking.org/plans/windshield-cooker.htm

and a nice article on solar cooking . . .

http://www.thecleanestline.com/2008/09/solar-cookin.html


Looks interesting...
The problem I would foresee is that they are slow and work best mid day, not the time I want to wait on a slow cooked meal.  The sun is low in the sky by the time I am ready to make camp most days.  It also could be pretty limited by cloudy days and in thick tree cover.

So I like the concept, but have trouble imagining it being practical on the tours I have done.

Offline dunedigger

Re: Touring Stove
« Reply #54 on: March 03, 2009, 10:17:40 am »
Yea, that is the only problem. It might be good for the days a person stops early or on days off xD Personally, solar cooking is one of my favorite ways to cook. I have an irrational fear of propane bottles, and making a fire isn't always good for the environment or legal.