Author Topic: top bicycle-friendly cities and towns  (Read 50938 times)

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Offline TCS

top bicycle-friendly cities and towns
« Reply #15 on: December 26, 2006, 10:41:16 am »
???  Wide right/curb/outside lanes are a different thing from the mispositioned striped-off bike lanes you seem to be describing.

TCS

"My name is Pither.  I am at present on a cycling tour of the North Cornwall area taking in Bude and..."

Offline DaveB

top bicycle-friendly cities and towns
« Reply #16 on: December 27, 2006, 04:36:13 pm »
???  Wide right/curb/outside lanes are a different thing from the mispositioned striped-off bike lanes you seem to be describing.

True but what I described is much more common that the bike lanes you desire.  You ask for well designed bike lanes but get terrible ones and the local officials then gloat about their great attention to the "needs" of bicyclists.  

There is a downside to the wide, curb side bike lanes you want too.  Cars from the auto travel lane that are turning right at an intersection cut across them and bicyclists that are going straight are too often overlooked.  Also, cars pulling out from a side street or driveway will often pull out into the bike lane to see what auto traffic is coming.  It's the same hazard riding on sidewalks pose.  



Offline TCS

top bicycle-friendly cities and towns
« Reply #17 on: December 28, 2006, 01:13:08 pm »
Well, there's a downside to almost everything!  Certainly a motorist can pull around a cyclist and immediately turn right with lanes of any width.

Please note I haven't asked for or expressed any desire for ~bike~ lanes - or even any more heat absorbing, run-off producting pavement.  I've only asked for restriping on thoroughfares to create wider curb lanes.  These lanes benefit buses and trucks and buffer pedestrians, plus there's no stripes or signage to contain or restrict the cyclist.  Riders can use the extra space to co-exist or move out further into the lane to protect their position as conditions warrant.

Best,
Tom

This message was edited by TCS on 12-28-06 @ 9:16 AM
"My name is Pither.  I am at present on a cycling tour of the North Cornwall area taking in Bude and..."

tofubicycle

  • Guest
top bicycle-friendly cities and towns
« Reply #18 on: January 04, 2007, 10:35:58 pm »
I will echo applause for Madison, Wisconsin and also for Washington DC. Not only to these cities offer terrific infrastructure for commuters as well as resources and a sizable cycling community but excellent roads and paths recreational cycling are directly connected to each city's internal network of commuter paths.

--
......... __ o
.........-\<,
......(O) (O)...........
...........................
i'd rather be biking.

Offline OkieEd

top bicycle-friendly cities and towns
« Reply #19 on: February 08, 2007, 01:26:15 pm »
Five Stars for the Twin Cities, Minnesota is certainly a bike friendly large city in which a rider could spend many days exploring. They have a bike/hike trail map of the metro area (Transport Press). In the 1960s I biked all over the cities and suburbs.  Now in the 2000s I find it a easy city to navigate as I end cross-country tours.  
 


Offline biker_james

top bicycle-friendly cities and towns
« Reply #20 on: February 09, 2007, 08:43:08 am »
I have to put in a good word for Nanaimo, B.C. We have pretty decent riding weather being on the West Coast, a decent amount of paved multi-use trails that actually take you somewhere. I know that they are just about useless when the weather is nice and they are full of dog-walkers and rollerbladers with I-Pods. However, they can be used to get around a couple pieces of road that are not bicycle friendly. The bigger streets have all got a wider curb lane to accomodate both (although it still confuses some motorists) and the bike routes are marked on the pavement-not a separate "lane"- just a bike symbol and "share the road"-most of these don't have on-street parking. The "freeway" around the City has a bike (multi-use)route parallel to it, but also has gorgeous wide shoulders so its quite safe to ride. The City has tuned all the traffic light sensors to be tripped by bicycles, and when one light was not working, an email got it fixed. There is a good sized community of commuters, and a ton of recreational cyclists, and the City has tuned in to that fact.
Its not perfect, but does a good job serving most riders out there. All the safety measures won't protect you from a careless driver though. Just as there are dozens of minor accidents daily between cars, there will be some with bicycles-and the bike loses every time unfortunately.


Offline raylrode

top bicycle-friendly cities and towns
« Reply #21 on: February 09, 2007, 01:09:24 pm »
Fluetz once again you have chosen to disparage the people of Mentor and I take exception to it once again. I have no more problem riding my bike in Mentor then any other community in the entire area,including your city Concord, Ohio. I not only will put our residents but our bike path system against any other city when it comes to committment to biking.



Ray Kirchner, Mayor/President
Mentor, Ohio City Council

This message was edited by raylrode on 2-9-07 @ 12:32 PM

Offline raylrode

top bicycle-friendly cities and towns
« Reply #22 on: February 09, 2007, 04:28:36 pm »
Please give me a call at 440-974-5755 if your going to be in the Mentor area and I would be only to happy to give you a personal bike tour of our wonderful city and it's great bike way system.

Mayor Ray Kirchner

This message was edited by raylrode on 2-9-07 @ 6:36 PM

Offline mike_khad1

top bicycle-friendly cities and towns
« Reply #23 on: February 10, 2007, 12:42:57 pm »
regarding dedicated bike paths. There are few walkers, strollers, joggers at 5:30 in the morning.

Work to Eat
Eat to Live
Live to Bike
Bike to Work

Work to Eat
Eat to Live
Live to Bike
Bike to Work

Offline TCS

top bicycle-friendly cities and towns
« Reply #24 on: February 11, 2007, 03:00:22 pm »
In the summer I often head out on a ten mile pre-work ride at 5:30am
and seldom even see a car on the streets.  I can't imagine fooling with my
town's paths when there are empty streets to ride.

Best,
Tom

"My name is Pither.  I am at present on a cycling tour of the North Cornwall area taking in Bude and..."

Offline undies

top bicycle-friendly cities and towns
« Reply #25 on: February 14, 2007, 03:03:15 pm »
For a smaller town I have to give a shoutout to Corvallis, Oregon. It's another flat college town with lots of bike paths/lanes, lots of bike shops, mild weather, etc.

I live near Corvallis in Albany, OR and it's also pretty good, all things considered. The only real complaint I have is that some businesses still don't have good bike racks.

I've had good luck with striped bike lanes on roads. Honestly, one of the biggest problems I have is cars that are *too* courteous; a car may have plenty of time to turn before I reach the intersection, but they remember passing me in the bike lane so they stop and wait... and now I have to figure out what they are going to do.  :quest:  In this case I generally just jump out into the regular traffic lane and pass the turning car on the left.

This message was edited by undies on 2-14-07 @ 11:04 AM

Offline Dan_E_Boye

top bicycle-friendly cities and towns
« Reply #26 on: February 19, 2007, 03:16:43 pm »
I have to agree with Corvallis.  I've lived here for about 6 months now and I think it's a great place to cycle.  I wish there was a good bike friendly way to ride from here to Linn-Benton Community College in Albany though.  Hwy 34 is not enjoyable riding.

Corvallis has five bike shops that I know of, and there's only about 50,000 people here.  


Offline bruno

top bicycle-friendly cities and towns
« Reply #27 on: February 19, 2007, 10:14:03 pm »
thing is--everywhere's good to cycle really when ya consider the alternative. assumin' you're not one of those who live way out in edge city and feel you have to drive to work in town.

boston's often cited by different bike rags as a bad place to be a cyclist, but we got a seriously vibrant bike community here. lot's o' bike shops, custom builders, activists, etc.

anywhere's good if you cycle it.

word.


Offline bigringer

top bicycle-friendly cities and towns
« Reply #28 on: May 03, 2007, 12:02:55 am »
I am new to the urban commuuting.  I recently moved to the raleigh area in nc and have had many new commuuting experiences since my old commute was on country roads.  I sat for what seemed like ten minutes at a red light at five in the morning before I realized the light didn't know I was there.  I have had semis turn right in front of me when I was going straight.  (now I ride in the middle of the straight lane so no one is tempted to go around)  I definately think you have to stake a claim to your part of the road.  Down here they are pretty proud of their bike routes but they are no more than signs with a picture of a bike on busy roads with no shoulder.  

in michigan the worst thing that happened to my daily commute was the rails to trails path that paralelled my usual route for several miles.  I will agree there are few people on them at five thirty in the morning, but at six at night it can be a different story. everything from dogs on fifteen foot leashes to baby strollers roller bladers and people walking three abreast that wont yeild.  when I chose to ride the road at these times I get nothing but motorist honking and pointing at the trail. I even got pulled over riding the trail at tenthirty pm by a police officer who thought I was on a motorcycle!!



Offline boonebikeguy

top bicycle-friendly cities and towns
« Reply #29 on: May 03, 2007, 04:07:39 am »
<
Where do you get these?  All of the "dedicated bike paths" I've ever seen are shared with walkers, runners, kids on skateboards, baby carriages, dogs on loooong leashes and, in general, users not paying the slightest attention to traffic discipline. In fact, most of them look at bicyclists as unwelcome intruders on THEIR trail.

In many ways, they are far more dangerous than road riding.

I agree that rail-trails far away from residential areas and at least one mile from major road crossings or parking areas can be nice to ride on but city trails are a horror for biking.>>

Well said..I HATE the so-called 'bike paths'...open roads and just a little consideration go a long way in my book. MOst people drive like jack-holes and as if it is a nascar race everywhere they go. They are mostly inconsiderate and hateful towards ANYONE on a bike..however..the few people that just drive like sane individuals make up for the vast majority of jackholes out there especially most truckers, they are a danger to themselves and everyone around them. [/rant off]


"Love is a river where crazy people drown"--Kyrgyz proverb
"Love is a river where crazy people drown"--Kyrgyz proverb