Author Topic: what bike do you use for pure urban ridin'?  (Read 29069 times)

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Offline Sailariel

what bike do you use for pure urban ridin'?
« Reply #15 on: May 14, 2007, 10:18:32 pm »
They have worked fine for three years and have racked up a few miles. To each his own.


Offline Sailariel

what bike do you use for pure urban ridin'?
« Reply #16 on: May 14, 2007, 10:26:40 pm »
Doug, When we lived and cruised on our sailboat, my wife and I had Dahon folders made of stainless steel with 16" wheels and SA 3Sp hubs. We still have them after 16 years and they are still in great shape. When we go cruising again we will probably get something more modern like the Helios.


Offline boonebikeguy

what bike do you use for pure urban ridin'?
« Reply #17 on: May 15, 2007, 12:22:26 am »
Hey Sail,
No offense man... sorry.

"Love is a river where crazy people drown"--Kyrgyz proverb
"Love is a river where crazy people drown"--Kyrgyz proverb

Offline bruno

what bike do you use for pure urban ridin'?
« Reply #18 on: May 18, 2007, 10:01:49 am »
hey boonebikeguy! yer nutz duder! nice whip!! i'm from greensboro. have a few buds who went to app state.


Offline boonebikeguy

what bike do you use for pure urban ridin'?
« Reply #19 on: May 18, 2007, 01:02:11 pm »
Yeah man Thanks for the kudos.. Love me some mountain riding. I have been riding up here for five years..went to the lowlands and rode once since then and was simply amazed....We are riding down to asheville this weekend (200 miles in two day there and back) I chose to ride up winklers for the helluva climbs before heading on the asheville. Monster rides for monster bikes.

"Love is a river where crazy people drown"--Kyrgyz proverb
"Love is a river where crazy people drown"--Kyrgyz proverb

Offline canalligators

what bike do you use for pure urban ridin'?
« Reply #20 on: June 06, 2007, 12:24:30 am »
Back in my wedgie days, I commuted on a '73 Raleigh International (pretty lugged 531 frame, mostly campy) that I adulterated into a commuter bike.  I changed to a split shift to give me drag racing gears, randonneur bars, short Weinmann sidepulls.  Added fenders, converted to clinchers (27x1 1/8 front, 27 x 1 1.4 rear - I'm 220#).  Of late, I've replaced the wheels with 700Cx28s.

But that's not what I came to talk about.

I want to convert this bike into an urban assault vehicle - the kind of bike I'd ride from the Battery to the GW Bridge, or up Michigan Avenue, or Younge Street...  My plan is to use a Sturmey Archer AW (alloy hub shell) with two speed derailleur on it, single sprocket the front, very narrow flat alloy bars, replace the Record pedals with SPDs.  Put on the fattest 700Cs that fit the frame, probably 32s, for the occasional pothole jump.  I might even strip/sandblast off the three coats of marine epoxy paint and replicate the original Chartreuse - or paint it flat black to reduce the theft value.

It needs to be light enough to accelerate well and carry onto the subway, yet strong enough to withstand the bad streets.

Thoughts?


Offline princesslittle

what bike do you use for pure urban ridin'?
« Reply #21 on: May 21, 2008, 09:56:45 pm »
I have two pair of this style pedal although they are not Shimano. One pair are Welgo and the other are Performance Bicycle's store brand.

They are OK and convenient for around town.

 Because of a hip rotation limitation on my right side, I can only use an SPD pedal for my left foot. I use a toe clip & strap on the other foot.

It takes a bit of concentration to flip the left pedal over to get the SPD side up so you can clip in.

Try before you buy, I'd say

Crabby old Uncle John


Offline princesslittle

what bike do you use for pure urban ridin'?
« Reply #22 on: May 21, 2008, 10:11:06 pm »
I have a mid eighties mountain bike that I have modified with narrow 26" wheels, freehub rear, a rear rack & alloy fenders.

An eclectic mix of old and new Shimano parts of various quality levels from XT to Tourney work together in amazing harmony.

There are two rear blinky lights (I don't trust just one) and a Nashbar LED front light, the latest of many front lights I have gone through over the years.

This bike has been ridden over bad roads, no roads, city streets & other unsavoury surfaces over the years, mostly in bad weather. I usually ride a better bike in good weather.

I tend to use Tioga City Slicker tires which always disappoint me with their fragile sidewalls and tendency to ozone crack prematurely.

I probably got this bike in 1998 or 1999.

Crabby old Uncle John




Offline Turk

what bike do you use for pure urban ridin'?
« Reply #23 on: May 25, 2008, 11:42:05 pm »
I use my old Raliegh Grand Prix, made in England, that I've been using for all purposes since I bought it in 1972. It's a touring bike with the shifters on the frame. The only thing I don't like about it is the Weinmann brakes. I don't think I'd like a new bike since I take it on the bus in the morning and I've heard that the bikes sometimes get stolen off the racks. I ride it 14 miles home in the afternoon. It's bike trail most of the way but some of the trail is pretty rough due to tree roots upsetting the asphalt. There's also a few small curbs to ride up. The wheels and tires handle it well.


Offline scott.laughlin

Re: what bike do you use for pure urban ridin'?
« Reply #24 on: August 11, 2009, 08:03:53 am »
My best commuter was a folding Dahon Helios I used in San Francisco. Jay Gaerlan, a gifted bike guy in San Francisco, (http://www.gaerlan.com/)used the Helios aluminum frame and added front suspension, seat post suspension, 24 gears, fenders, a rear rack that allowed me to carry a briefcase pannier or a grocery sack pannier without hitting my heels or the ground, and combo SPD and platform pedals as well. He chose Vuelta rims that never went out of true, and Schwalbe Marathon tires that never suffered a puncture despite daily rides through SF streets with debris and potholes.

The big advantage of the folder in SF was being able to take it on the BART subway trains, folded, at any time of the day. Ordinary bikes are restricted to the first and last cars, and forbidden during rush hours. Busses and the CalTrain communter train allow bikes all the time in special facilities, so folding was not an advantage there, but being able to take the bike into a restaurant or hotel or library, folded, was a huge advantage. I had a hybrid stolen, while locked with a Kryptonite cable lock to a standpipe in a lighted, covered garage patrolled by an off duty SF policeman at an in-town SF hotel. The cable had been cut and no one saw anything. After that, the folder came in with me when I was visiting in town. Most places simply accomodated it as they would a wheel chair (which the folded bike sort of resembles). Great commuter -- carried my gear to work and back, and on errands. Quick to set up and take down, every bit as fast as the public transit in SF, but with a reliable schedule: I could leave when I wanted and be on time at the destination.


Doug Stetson
San Francisco bound

I own a Bike Friday NWT for the same reasons you've stated.

Scott

Offline lender

Re: what bike do you use for pure urban ridin'?
« Reply #25 on: January 23, 2010, 08:44:43 am »
I'm about to get a Mongoose XR-comp bike for my "urban" cruising.  I'm hoping to get it next month when I get paid.  The suspension is mostly not needed for urban terrain but I love the padding...

Offline bikemanNY21

Re: what bike do you use for pure urban ridin'?
« Reply #26 on: February 03, 2010, 09:07:33 pm »
I'm about to get a Mongoose XR-comp bike for my "urban" cruising.  I'm hoping to get it next month when I get paid.  The suspension is mostly not needed for urban terrain but I love the padding...

Man i used to have mongoose, and i wasn't really happy with it, i'll advice you to add SOME extra money and get Trek, KHS, maybe GT... all is My IMHO...

p.s. currently i have KHS urban-x and really like it.
Bike rentals nyc


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