Author Topic: Anyone have any TIPS on Shimano SPD pedals??  (Read 249 times)

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Offline Biketouringhobo

Anyone have any TIPS on Shimano SPD pedals??
« on: July 24, 2016, 05:00:48 pm »
Anyone have any TIPS on Shimano SPD pedals??

I am getting ready to use to Shimano M545 DH SPD pedals and my Cleats are Shimano SH-56 multi-release and Should I set the spring tension low?? and my cleats are mounted to Teva Pivot DH SPD Shoes and Any more Tips on getting use to SPD pedals on my Touring Bicycle??

Offline John Nelson

Re: Anyone have any TIPS on Shimano SPD pedals??
« Reply #1 on: July 24, 2016, 11:17:15 pm »
Leave the spring tension as set by the factory, which should be in the middle of the range. Count on falling over twice, once within the first hour, and then once again once you get use to them but forget. It won't be long before clipping out will be second-nature; you won't even think about it. Clean the gunk out of them when they get dirty. If they start sticking, spray with a silicon lubricant. Replace them when you starting coming out of them when you don't mean to, or when the bearings start making noise. They don't last forever. Neither do the cleats.

Offline staehpj1

Re: Anyone have any TIPS on Shimano SPD pedals??
« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2016, 06:32:18 am »
Replace them when you starting coming out of them when you don't mean to, or when the bearings start making noise. They don't last forever. Neither do the cleats.
My experience has been different.  I found that cheaper clone pedals wore out quickly, but the actual Shimano models seemed to last almost forever.

I have some of the very first SPD pedals that were used for lots of muddy mountain bike riding/racing, some general around town usage, and quite a few tours including a couple coast to coast ones over the last 35 years or so.  I am not sure how many miles are on them, but between two pairs of the original SPDs it must be well over 100,000 miles on the higher mileage of the two and just a bit less on the other pair.

Both have been repacked only once as best I can remember.  The exposed parts were cleaned and lightly lubed often.  The repacking is a real pain on the ones I have so thankfully it needs to be done very infrequently.

I also have a newer model from 2010 that have less mileage on them but they too are holding up fine.  They have required no maintenance other than the normal cleaning and lubing.

If they start to get loose it has generally been the cleats which do wear out after a while, but I have adjusted the release tension a few times (I like them fairly tight).

I am not sure if it makes any difference, but all of real shimano pedals were the simple ones with no platform or cage.

The clones I have handled were widely variable in quality.  One set I bought from nashbar for a family member were worthless right from the start with poor quality bearings that were not smooth no matter what I did and release mechanisms that didn't retain the cleats well.  Others were OK but wore out much faster than the real Shimano ones.  A pair of Performance house brand (Forte campus pedals probably made by wellgo) on my daughter's bike were starting to show some wear after doing one TA tour, but were still in use for a couple years of commuting.

I will mention one other thing.  I think it is very important to take the time to get the angle of the cleats just right for you.  This usually requires fitting them, riding a short distance, tweaking the setting, and trying them again.  Repeat until you are well satisfied with the adjustment.  If you don't get it right knee pain can result so take your time setting them up the first time. 
« Last Edit: July 25, 2016, 06:34:53 am by staehpj1 »

Offline driftlessregion

Re: Anyone have any TIPS on Shimano SPD pedals??
« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2016, 09:17:55 am »
You'll need to replace the cleats several times before the pedals wear out. Replace them when you have difficulty releasing from the pedal-assuming the cleat isn't rusty, use lube as was mentioned- or when your shoe/cleat feels loose or rocks vertically on the pedal. A clacking sound while pedaling is a cue that the cleat is worn.

There is a range of quality of the bearings across the Shimano line of pedals. Some wear out quickly, some last longer.

Offline Iowagriz

Re: Anyone have any TIPS on Shimano SPD pedals??
« Reply #4 on: July 26, 2016, 10:17:18 am »
I remember a tip that I read many, many years ago, when SPD were first introduced.....to get out, think of the motion that a smoker makes when stepping on a cigarette.  Push down, before twisting out.  That releases a bit of tension compared to what most people were used to doing with toe cages (clips).

Offline Biketouringhobo

Re: Anyone have any TIPS on Shimano SPD pedals??
« Reply #5 on: July 26, 2016, 02:50:51 pm »
I remember a tip that I read many, many years ago, when SPD were first introduced.....to get out, think of the motion that a smoker makes when stepping on a cigarette.  Push down, before twisting out.  That releases a bit of tension compared to what most people were used to doing with toe cages (clips).

I remember this in 1998 when I had a Mtn Bike with Shimano M545 DH SPD Pedal but I used the Shimano SH-56 multi-release cleats with a Bob Yak Trailer

Offline PeteJack

Re: Anyone have any TIPS on Shimano SPD pedals??
« Reply #6 on: Today at 01:23:49 pm »
Count on falling over twice, once within the first hour, and then once again once you get use to them but forget. It won't be long before clipping out will be second-nature; you won't even think about it.
+1 To minimize the chances of this find a gym or Y that has a stationary bikes you can use. (They often have pedals with SPD on one side and platform on the other or put your own SPDs on.) Then you can practice getting in and out without the risk of falling. I always tell people to make their first attempt at using SPDs on grass. I didn't and wished I had.

The experience of stopping at a light and being unable to get your feet off the pedals is not to be missed.

But persevere. Before long you'll wonder how you rode without them. Use long flat bits of your touring to practice 360 degree pedaling until it becomes 2nd nature. IMO it's like skiing, a learned skill but well worth it.