Author Topic: Best GPS for touring  (Read 608 times)

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Offline jrswenberger

Re: Best GPS for touring
« Reply #15 on: December 01, 2014, 01:30:50 pm »
Great guys for all the help, it appears the Etrex is the one to get.  Now what's the difference between Etrex 20 and 30 besides cost?

Then I noticed Garmin has two types of maps, Topo US 100k and Garmin Street Maps and Navigation called the City Navigator NT, which of the two is best for road touring?  or can both be inside the unit and accessed separately?

The etrex 30 adds a barometric altimeter, electronic compass and the ability to wirelessly transfer information. Other than that, the 20 and 30 are only different colors.

Open Street maps are free and can be downloaded for nearly any part of the planet. Here's a link

We've been using an older etrex for years with Open Street maps around the world. It recently was killed in a horrendous downpour in Turkey due to a well known (fixed in the 10/20/30 series) design flaw. We will be happily returning to touring in New Zealand and Australia in 6 weeks with our new etrex 30!  We don't need it for turn by turn directions, only to verify general navigation decisions on the bike. Off the bike, we regularly take it into the backcountry, especially in the snowy winter where trails don't exist.

Enjoy the ride,
Jay
ACA Life Member 368

Offline froze

Re: Best GPS for touring
« Reply #16 on: December 01, 2014, 05:43:12 pm »
Thanks again, now I think this is my last question: can both the topo US 100k and the City Navigator NT (Open Street Maps) be saved in the Etrex and be called up separately as need requires of one or the other?  Or for cycling just get the Open Street Maps and forget the other?

Offline mdxix

Re: Best GPS for touring
« Reply #17 on: December 01, 2014, 10:47:18 pm »
Thanks again, now I think this is my last question: can both the topo US 100k and the City Navigator NT (Open Street Maps) be saved in the Etrex and be called up separately as need requires of one or the other?  Or for cycling just get the Open Street Maps and forget the other?
Yes, you can have multiple maps, just make sure you have a large enough memory card to store both (probably 8GB+).

City Navigator NT ≠ Open Street Maps. One is for $100+ while the other is free, among many other differences.

Offline froze

Re: Best GPS for touring
« Reply #18 on: December 02, 2014, 10:01:34 am »
Great guys all my questions have been answered.  I'm leaning toward the 20 since it's a bit less money and the extra stuff it comes with I really don't need, but I may revise later.