Author Topic: Long distance cycling and supliments  (Read 3831 times)

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Offline tonythomson

Long distance cycling and supliments
« on: January 27, 2009, 02:57:57 pm »
Any advice on which, if any, supliments you take on long distance riding?  Especially where a good balanced diet might be hard to find. Or maybe something like creatine?

What are yor thoughts? Have to say haven't ever used them before but getting a bit older now.


Just starting to record my trips  www.tonystravels.com

Offline whittierider

Re: Long distance cycling and supliments
« Reply #1 on: January 27, 2009, 05:11:53 pm »
Make sure you at least get calcium since you lose a lot in your sweat (which is why osteoperosis is common among long-time cyclists-- they don't supplement to replace what they lose) and add sodium and potassium to your drinking water according to http://www.cyclingnews.com/fitness.php?id=fitness/2006/sodium_intake .  Celtic Sea Salt is much better for your joints and everything else than common table salt is.  It has a lot of trace nutrients besides salt.  For the potassium, use a little Morton's Lite salt.  The name is not very appropriate, as there's nothing light about it.  It's all salt, but half of it is potassium chloride instead of sodium chloride.  (There are many kinds of salts besides sodium chloride.)

I supplement a lot of other things, but one I will particularly draw attention to is vitamin C; because a molecule of vitamin C is used up for every molecule of adrenaline the body makes, and vitamin C is essential for good heart health.

Offline staehpj1

Re: Long distance cycling and supliments
« Reply #2 on: January 27, 2009, 06:32:25 pm »
Ha Ha!  We took Flintstones chewables on the Trans America!  I am not a big believer in supplements, but my daughter took them and handed me one each day.  I can't say the did or didn't help.


Offline Westinghouse

Re: Long distance cycling and supliments
« Reply #3 on: January 28, 2009, 06:10:21 am »
Here at most are supplements I have taken on any one long-distance bicycling tour. B complex vitamins. All other vitamins in single pills for each one. Sometimes brewer's yeast which I would mix with orange juice at stops. Protein powder. Creatine would be all right too. Why not? On my last tour I just took one multivitamin each day.

Offline whittierider

Re: Long distance cycling and supliments
« Reply #4 on: January 28, 2009, 02:41:19 pm »
Quote
Sometimes brewer's yeast which I would mix with orange juice at stops. Protein powder.
You might be happy to know that brewer's yeast, at least Lewis Labs brand which is the only one I know of that's not sour, is more than half protein by weight, and has all the amino acids.  I use it to help keep my reactive hypoglycemia from dropping the bottom out of my blood-sugar level.

Offline geegee

Re: Long distance cycling and supliments
« Reply #5 on: January 28, 2009, 04:54:24 pm »
I usually take ordinary multi vitamins that are geared for active people, like Centrum Performance. I find it does help my energy level from day to day while touring. I've heard creatine does not really do much for cardio-vascular exertion, and may demand extra hydration from your body, something that is already in short supply when you are sweating a lot. I've taken creatine when doing weight training and it does have results when taken in short concentrated periods while doing targeted muscle-building exercises. It does little for endurance and may be hard on your kidneys/liver when taken over long periods especially when you are on a strenuous schedule like long distance cycling.

Offline Westinghouse

Re: Long distance cycling and supliments
« Reply #6 on: January 29, 2009, 06:17:34 am »
I thought creatine might be good for cycling, but apparently it may not be the thing to use on long tours. Actually, the only thing I have ever heard it being used for was before and after lifting weights. Actually, eggs are an excellent source of absorbable protein where absorbtion is the matter, but then there is the matter of fat. If one is using the fat then perhaps it is ok, but excess fat in the diet has been more than just linked with colon cancer and other maladies. Eggs are loaded with protein, and where is all that protein mostly concentrated? In the yolk with the fat. If you follow the Pritikin plan, you know to dump the yolks and use the whites. However, I think high fat diets are mostly associated with what is known as the typical western diet which is known to be pretty much loaded with fatty foods from many sources. Eating plenty of eggs on tour would be ok as long as one watched his or her intake of fats from other sources. When on long tours and megadosing with water soluble vitamis and keeping up on the others, and drinking brewer's yeast a few times a day, I am pretty sure my energy levels were higher than usual. I have also carried a full complement of minerals.

Any nutritionist might tell you all you really need is a good, balanced diet of fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains and cereals, and this is true within limits. But consider pedaling a fully-loaded touring bike three thousand miles over varied terrain, hills, mountains, rolling, etc. It might call for supplements. I will tell you something that I know will provide a long, even flow of energy. You take a good quality juicing machine. Juice a 50-50 combination of carrot and celery juice. Make half a quart or a quart. Drink it down. Go out for a long ride in the hot sun. See if you can feel the difference. I always could. The first time you might not notice it too much, but the second or third time you will feel a major difference as compared the energy you might be used to from just regular meals. Nutrition makes a difference.

It will not hurt you to take nutritional supplements on tour. It may add a little weight but that's ok.

Offline bogiesan

Re: Long distance cycling and supliments
« Reply #7 on: January 30, 2009, 08:52:31 am »
Any nutritionist might tell you all you really need is a good, balanced diet of fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains and cereals, and this is true within limits. But consider pedaling a fully-loaded touring bike three thousand miles over varied terrain, hills, mountains, rolling, etc.

Any nutritionist will tell you "energy" is only available from calories; calories that are packed into carbs, fats, and proteins. Claims that "energy" can be delivered from any other source is marketing BS. There are substances that can stimulate but this is not energy.

Supplements are unnecessary unless you really know what your body is lacking or what you knwo canot be acquired with a reasonable diet. You end up carrying a bunch of expensive pills that can spoil and provide no provable benefits. Your perception may be different and your metabolism may actually require supplementation but you should know that long before you set out on a tour that presents severe conditions you do not know how to handle or that may deny your body what it is accustomed to consuming and processing.

I carry omega3 capsules. That's all. But I know I'm going to be adequately fed by the catering people.

david boise ID
I play go. I use Macintosh. Of course I ride a recumbent

Offline tonythomson

Re: Long distance cycling and supliments
« Reply #8 on: January 30, 2009, 10:04:37 am »
Guys,
many thanks this has been most helpful, and for sure if one could always get a good balanced diet that would be preferable but I think we all know at times it's not always possible.  Have to say the thought of having to eat a Big Mac once in a while fills me with horror.

Anyone interested can follow our progress www.bike4gus.com - I realy like this forum and have learnt so much from other cyclists.
Tony
Just starting to record my trips  www.tonystravels.com

Offline John Nettles

Re: Long distance cycling and supplements
« Reply #9 on: January 30, 2009, 06:48:08 pm »
I have never had a problem.  If I can muscle cramps, I just eat a few extra bananas and order some fries for extra salt.  Overall, if you eat a variety of foods which you can get at most small town diners or especially if you make your own, you will most likely be OK unless there is some other underlying medical issue.  Most supplements only absorb about 10-15% anyway.
Happy trails and may the wind be at your back!
John