Author Topic: bike security  (Read 4379 times)

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bobbirob22

  • Guest
bike security
« on: January 29, 2009, 04:57:45 pm »
http://cgi.ebay.com/Motorbike-Alarm-Security-Bicycle-Steal-Lock-Moped-Bike_W0QQitemZ400027812012QQcmdZViewItemQQptZAU_Sport_Cycling_Parts?hash=item400027812012&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14&_trkparms=72%3A1205|66%3A2|65%3A12|39%3A1|240%3A1318|301%3A0|293%3A1|294%3A50

heres a handy little gadget i found on ebay, its a motion activated alarm for bikes..

bobbirob22

  • Guest
Re: bike security
« Reply #1 on: January 29, 2009, 08:02:01 pm »
heres another one with a video demo of the alarm and also has a video demo of a popular kryptonite U lock being picked in just seconds with a ink pen. U lock owners beware....

http://www.bicyclesecuritysystems.com/
« Last Edit: January 29, 2009, 08:10:49 pm by bobbirob22 »

Offline WesternFlyer

Re: bike security
« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2009, 12:23:36 pm »
 popular kryptonite U lock being picked in just seconds with a ink pen. U lock owners beware....


I thought Kryptonite recalled all their cylinder keyed U locks years ago.  On tour I use a thin 6 ft long cable and a very light combo lock.  I carried a 3 lb combination U lock for four weeks on last summer's tour and never used it once.  I used the little lock mostly to keep the raccoons out of the food lockers at the hike & bikes.
Western Flyer

We must ride light and swift.  It is a long road ahead.

King Theoden

Offline Fred Hiltz

Re: bike security
« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2009, 07:19:45 am »
popular kryptonite U lock being picked in just seconds with a ink pen. U lock owners beware....

I thought Kryptonite recalled all their cylinder keyed U locks years ago...
They did. I got a new one in exchange and have not heard of any problems with those.

Fred

Offline Tourista829

Re: bike security
« Reply #4 on: February 20, 2009, 10:58:08 am »
I like an 8 foot chain that loops through one end and the other end is the receptical for the lock. It is made by Serfas and retails for around $30. It is light, very strong, and a locksmith I brought it too said it was very difficult to defeat. The 8 feet is great especially if you have two bikes. The best part is that I only have to use the key to unlock it not to put the lock on.

Offline Westinghouse

Re: bike security
« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2009, 06:54:49 am »
I usually use only a small loop-type cable with a built on tubular combination lock. It is very light and strong. It would not stand a cable cutter, but it would be very difficult to just break. When I stop to eat in a restaurant I always try to position myself to be able to look out the window, and keep an eye on everything. When I go into a grocery strore I take important articles inside with me, e.g., money, T-checks, ID, passport, etc.

Offline bogiesan

Re: bike security
« Reply #6 on: February 22, 2009, 11:28:13 am »
What you invest in your security system is a simple, direct relationship. It is a ratio with the total cost of security (devices plus the cost of your regime in terms of time and inconvenience) over the total cost of your bike including contents, emotional investment, and hassle of replacing it all wherever you happen to be when you lose it. A $10 lock and two minutes (round that to $50) over $5,000 is 0.01. Not a good ratio, is it? I'd want it closer to 0.10 but you probably need to apply an imaginary factor for your geographic and cultural locations.

Be sure to research motion-sensing alarms by examining the post-purchase responses. My anecdotal knowledge of such devices includes endless complaints of false activations. On a group tour that means you can get ostracized.

I do supported tours on my recumbent. I carry a small cable lock with a combination lock (easy to lose a key on tour) but I worry more about mindless vandalism than I do about theft.

david boise ID
I play go. I use Macintosh. Of course I ride a recumbent

Offline John Nettles

Re: bike security
« Reply #7 on: February 23, 2009, 12:04:26 am »
Like others, I just made a 10' thinner plastic coated wire cable (3/16") with a lightweight combo lock.  I can lock my bike to almost anything and can loop it through the pack handles to prevent "easy opportunity" theft.  I take my critical essentials with me at all times.  If possible, I tell someone who will be nearby (ticket taker, camp host, etc.) that is my bike and I would appreciate them keeping an eye on it.  Obviously it is not fool-proof, but then I tour mainly in the US & Canada so I am not as concerned about theft compared to say, African continent or parts of Asia.

When I tent camp, I usually lock loop the cable to a tent pole so if someone tries to take at night, I might hear it more.
Happy trails and may the wind be at your back!
John

Offline johnsondasw

Re: bike security
« Reply #8 on: April 11, 2009, 12:44:04 am »
I use a very thin cable with the tubular combo lock and a 6 foot cable with a master combo lock.  These fit easily into a jersy back pocket on day rides along with all the other stuff.  I never leave the bike to go into a store, restaurant, etc without taking wallet, ID, etc important stuff with me.  Bicyclegifts.com sells waterproof plastic holders for cards and money cheap.  They are advertised in the Adventure Cycling mag monthly.  I find them useful for biking, travelling, and climbing.   
May the wind be at your back!

Offline Westinghouse

Re: bike security
« Reply #9 on: April 11, 2009, 07:56:27 am »
The Kryptonite, horseshoe locks are really good. Nobody can break the thing and carry your bike away from what it is connected to. However, they do have a weak point. Anybody with a battery powered, hand-held power drill of good quality can drill out that lock, and have your bike in about two minutes. A lock is good for one thing only, and that is for keeping an honest man honest. If somebody really wants to steal your bike, they will figure out a way.
« Last Edit: April 15, 2009, 08:22:44 am by Westinghouse »