Author Topic: finding a riding partner  (Read 3853 times)

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Offline gjjmtnus

finding a riding partner
« on: February 10, 2009, 02:34:27 pm »
I am a 40-year-old guy, who has been riding seriously mostly on Mt bike for long-distance multi-terrain tours since college, excluding a eight year vacation from riding due to life's challenges (ie: family, finances and frequent moves).   I have been in Colorado for eight years now and while balancing the needs and responsibilities of wife/kids I've returned to a semi-serious mtb/road riding, going on multi-day tours 1x per year and getting in two 10-17 mile bike commutes to work / week and at a minimum of two 40-50 mile rides in a month mostly in the higher elevations.  As a result of my current life style, though, it has been hard finding a rider of equal enthusiasm and yet similar limitations for training and what not.  Either my partner/friend is less adapt on two wheels for extended periods of time, or the individual is a bachelor or just too young to comprehend the slower pace that has apparently accompanied my age and lifestyle.  I'm not a novice by any stretch, but no expert rider either, undertaking a 300 some mile self-created mtb bike tour in southern CO, and am back to the drawing board of finding a rider of equal limitations and strengths. Is there anyone out there who has any idea where I'm coming from and/or knows of someone who would be interested in such an undertaking? 
 
Climb till there is no trail, then keep climbing.

Offline Westinghouse

Re: finding a riding partner
« Reply #1 on: February 13, 2009, 01:07:20 am »
I'm afraid I would not be able to give you any useful advice about something like that, other than to maybe try putting in an ad somwhere such as in a local newspaper. My connection to cycling is long distance, fully loaded, touring. I have done long tours with others, and those others were always women, except for one trek to Key West and back with an acquaintance of mine. Because I am a guy, going on a long tour with a lady friend is considered really the best way to go, but I have also mounted several very long tours all by myself, and liked it just fine.

As for your situation, I am not sure I have any experiences of my own to draw from to give you advice. There is a looking for partners section on this website.

Offline John Nettles

Re: finding a riding partner
« Reply #2 on: February 13, 2009, 05:46:31 pm »
I can relate to everything but I am more of the motivated, skilled, etc. who is not in as much shape as you.  However, now that the kids are mid-teens, once I get my youngest off to college, I will be embarking on the southern tier route from Key West to complete my perimeter tour then do several others.  Look me up in a few years!

John
Happy trails and may the wind be at your back!
John

Offline Westinghouse

Re: finding a riding partner
« Reply #3 on: February 14, 2009, 02:28:27 am »
I can relate to everything but I am more of the motivated, skilled, etc. who is not in as much shape as you.  However, now that the kids are mid-teens, once I get my youngest off to college, I will be embarking on the southern tier route from Key West to complete my perimeter tour then do several others.  Look me up in a few years!

John

That is an excellent choice for a transcon. I have done it a number of times myself. In order for me to close the perimeter I would have to go from Bar Harbor, Ellsworth actually, to Fargo or to Minneapolis or thereabouts; not that I think closing the perimeter is any big deal. After all, I have done the atlantic coast three times, the ST a number of times, the PCBR, 2600 miles of the NT, and a lot more besides.

I was gearing up to do the ST this past winter, December-January, when a job I had been looking into did open up. I wanted to do the ST, but not being rich, and being in need of an income, the wiser decision was to take the job. Before then it was not clear whether or not the job would open, but it finally did. I don't know when I will be getting away on another long cycling tour. I have two daughters in Florida who are eight and seven. I send them money every month, and that requires a steady income. Maybe this summer I can do a round trip from where I live to Key West and back, but that would be about it for these days.

Offline gjjmtnus

Re: finding a riding partner
« Reply #4 on: February 17, 2009, 03:21:10 pm »
I can relate to everything but I am more of the motivated, skilled, etc. who is not in as much shape as you.  However, now that the kids are mid-teens, once I get my youngest off to college, I will be embarking on the southern tier route from Key West to complete my perimeter tour then do several others.  Look me up in a few years!

John

I envy your situation on one hand, that your kids are older, but I appreciate that I can train my boy up to be a mtb fanatic like myself.  Happy trails!
Climb till there is no trail, then keep climbing.

Offline biker_james

Re: finding a riding partner
« Reply #5 on: February 18, 2009, 06:56:20 am »
though, it has been hard finding a rider of equal enthusiasm and yet similar limitations for training and what not.  Either my partner/friend is less adapt on two wheels for extended periods of time, or the individual is a bachelor or just too young to comprehend the slower pace that has apparently accompanied my age and lifestyle.  I'm not a novice by any stretch, but no expert rider either, undertaking a 300 some mile self-created mtb bike tour in southern CO, 
Maybe you will have to make some concessions and be willing to slow down to ride with someone "less adept". Most couples who ride together end up doing that I believe. At least my wifer and I do-when she has slow days, I wait, and when I'm slow, she waits. Not a big issue if you want company on the ride. Plus, you might find some less skilled riders improve fairly quickly to your level.

Offline gjjmtnus

Re: finding a riding partner
« Reply #6 on: February 18, 2009, 10:33:16 am »

Maybe you will have to make some concessions and be willing to slow down to ride with someone "less adept". Most couples who ride together end up doing that I believe. At least my wifer and I do-when she has slow days, I wait, and when I'm slow, she waits. Not a big issue if you want company on the ride. Plus, you might find some less skilled riders improve fairly quickly to your level.
[/quote]

Well, I think what I also meant is that in many cases, I am the weaker link. Due to family etc. I don't ride near as much, and mostly solo.  don't know how I would keep up with today's "biking crowd".  But the only way to find out is to see where other fanatical riders are at in their pursuit of the trail.  I spend a good deal of time with my 4-year-old boy on the wider mtb tracks, and its great to see how enthused he is about riding.
Climb till there is no trail, then keep climbing.

bobbirob22

  • Guest
Re: finding a riding partner
« Reply #7 on: March 01, 2009, 06:24:08 pm »
Is there anyone out there who has any idea where I'm coming from and/or knows of someone who would be interested in such an undertaking? 


 



http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/

try lookling for a partner here.

Offline cyclebum

Re: finding a riding partner
« Reply #8 on: March 09, 2009, 12:35:02 am »
I've toured solo and with a partner. There are pluses and minuses to both ways, but I'd give the edge to riding with a partner.

I live in a small town in a county where you can count serious cyclist on one hand. I wasn't even looking for a partner and lucked up on two over 3 years. Found one on Warmshowers about 70 miles from where I live and the other thru CG about 200 miles away. Point being, you may have to depend on luck here. Being involved in the touring forums/sites is one way to find a partner.

It takes a great deal of flexibility for two or more people to have a good tour together, especially a long one. I tend to be the more flexible. I am satisfied with letting my partner plan the tour and set the pace which is about 50 miles/day, plus or minus 20. We don't ride together necessarily. We do end the day at the same place and stay in touch via cp. We don't even expect to camp together. If one wants a motel and the other doesn't, fine. If one wants to lag behind at lunch and the other wants to forge ahead, fine. Flexibility is the key.

Be aware of your partner's moods and try to accomodate. Offer help when needed. Compliments go a long way.

Well, sorry. You didn't ask for philosophy but got it anyway. Good luck.

Offline gjjmtnus

Re: finding a riding partner
« Reply #9 on: March 10, 2009, 02:31:39 pm »
I appreciate your point about flexibility, while usually I am the faster rider and its easy to be patient for me when your in that situation.  However, last summer riding with a chap 15 years my younger I lagged on a multi-day by an hour up to 3, depending, and I felt terrible.  I liked your way, but I refuse to recruit anyone on one of my mtb runs who will have to wait for me to that degree again,  increasing my training time double this year, hopefully.

I've toured solo and with a partner. There are pluses and minuses to both ways, but I'd give the edge to riding with a partner.

I live in a small town in a county where you can count serious cyclist on one hand. I wasn't even looking for a partner and lucked up on two over 3 years. Found one on Warmshowers about 70 miles from where I live and the other thru CG about 200 miles away. Point being, you may have to depend on luck here. Being involved in the touring forums/sites is one way to find a partner.

It takes a great deal of flexibility for two or more people to have a good tour together, especially a long one. I tend to be the more flexible. I am satisfied with letting my partner plan the tour and set the pace which is about 50 miles/day, plus or minus 20. We don't ride together necessarily. We do end the day at the same place and stay in touch via cp. We don't even expect to camp together. If one wants a motel and the other doesn't, fine. If one wants to lag behind at lunch and the other wants to forge ahead, fine. Flexibility is the key.

Be aware of your partner's moods and try to accomodate. Offer help when needed. Compliments go a long way.

Well, sorry. You didn't ask for philosophy but got it anyway. Good luck.

Climb till there is no trail, then keep climbing.