Author Topic: New to Touring  (Read 3506 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline curdog

New to Touring
« on: March 27, 2009, 11:42:03 pm »
I am planning on doing some light touring this year. Anything that I do in the next two years would be supported. I'm looking for ideas on possibly appropriate bikes. I am going to a number of LBS's for their ideas also. I believe the problem that I will encounter is a lack of interest or knowledge in touring.
The first ride I would like to do is the C&O. Either a hybrid or mountain bike is recommended. I was thinking more along the lines of a Surley CrossCheck with the hope that I could use it for other touring trips later.
I currently have a Fuji road bike which I guess could be used on most supported tours if trail rides aren't included. Does this make sense?

Offline Westinghouse

Re: New to Touring
« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2009, 01:35:20 pm »
Yes, it makes sense. To start out, google touring bicycles, bicycle touring, and crazyguyonabike.com. Other than that you need to be a bit more specific. There are people contributing to this forum who have knowledge on equipment, gear, and touring itself. I would suggest reading through the threads on this forum. You may come across answers to questions you never knew you had to ask.

Offline cyclebum

Re: New to Touring
« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2009, 10:18:12 am »
You're obviously very knowledgeable about bicycles. The XC will certainly do the job, and would probably be a bit more comfortable than the Fugi for long rides. This assumes you don't intend to ever do loaded touring and have no need for fenders, a front rack, heel clearance for panniers, or low gearing. If you think otherwise, I'd suggest the LHT.

You already have a dedicated road bike. The XC is sort of a compromise between a road and mountain bike and designed specifically for the sport of cyclo cross racing. No compromising with the LHT. Designed to carry a load just about anywhere, with lots of attach points for accessories.

I just don't see how the XC fits here. The Fugi should serve you well for credit card touring. The LHT for self supported touring. OTOH, nothing at all wrong with stocking your stable with all three. No compromises at all that way.

Offline mucknort

Re: New to Touring
« Reply #3 on: April 02, 2009, 10:43:07 pm »
I'm looking for ideas on possibly appropriate bikes.

I'd like to humbly suggest that you (and anyone else considering the question) look into a recumbent bike as a possibility. I rode thousands of miles, in the past, on traditional touring bikes and relaxed angle mountain bikes. I now tour on a recumbent and love every minute. For some, a traditional style bike works well for their them, but I tired of the butt/crotch, wrist, neck, back pain that I experienced. I find a recumbent style bicycle to be an ideal machine for long miles on the road.

Offline staehpj1

Re: New to Touring
« Reply #4 on: April 03, 2009, 08:12:12 am »
I just don't see how the XC fits here. The Fugi should serve you well for credit card touring. The LHT for self supported touring. OTOH, nothing at all wrong with stocking your stable with all three. No compromises at all that way.
Different strokes, but I can see the Cross Check working out very well for both long distance and shorter tours.  Going for a few extra bucks and getting the Travelers Check might be a good idea if you expect to fly with the bike.

Not sure why you think that the Cross Check won't accept fenders or a front rack.  It has enough clearance and all the attachment points except the mid fork braze on.  While less elegant, a plastic coated u-bolt easily replaces the mid fork mount at least with some racks.  I also doubt that most people will have heel clearance problems if they go with modest sized rear panniers.  Personally I think that 4 modest sized panniers is the way to go anyway.

As far as the LHT, not being a compromise...  That just isn't the case.  Any bike is a compromise, for some it may be more of a compromise than the Cross Check.  My guess is that it would be for the OP.

Offline RussSeaton

Re: New to Touring
« Reply #5 on: April 03, 2009, 10:32:22 am »
I presume that C&O is a crushed gravel converted railroad trail.  Your current road bike will work just fine on that.  Assuming the trail is dry.  I've ridden many miles on gravel roads with a racing bike just fine.  I'd recommend delaying the purchase of any bike until you actually decide to do loaded touring.  For loaded touring a loaded touring bike is the best.  Unless you pull a trailer then I suspect your road bike would work.  I don't understand the logic of getting something like the Cross Check that does most things OK but nothing really well.  If you're going to get a Surly, then get the Long Haul for loaded touring.  If you want a cyclo cross bike then get one with quicker handling and much lighter weight for carrying.  If you want a commuter bike, then likely the Long Haul would work better.

Offline jcostanz

Re: New to Touring
« Reply #6 on: April 03, 2009, 01:27:00 pm »
When I did the C&O with Adventure cycling a couple of years ago, it had just rained for several days before.  A lot of it consisted of two tracks, about the width of the maintaince trucks used on the trail, with grass and twigs between.  Wide tires are a must for this trail.

I did it on a recumbent trike.  It is the only trail that I have done that 3 wheels is a BIG Mistake.  What ever you do, make sure you have fenders on the bike.

Offline staehpj1

Re: New to Touring
« Reply #7 on: April 03, 2009, 04:28:30 pm »
Trail condition varies widely depending on how the recent weather has been.  In wet periods it gets quite messy.

Offline sammyiam

Re: New to Touring
« Reply #8 on: May 28, 2009, 08:03:09 am »
I road the C&O last fall (DC to Cumberland MD), along with the connection to Pittsburgh from Cumberland Maryland.  First suggestion, get on the yahoo group for the Great Allegheny Passage.  All of your questions will be answered there.  Second, a road bike on the C&O is a bad idea.  Path conditions vary dramatically.  The number of ruts, tree roots and the grassy median make a road bike impractical and no fun.  I have ridden it at various times with both a road bike (Scott CR1) and a hybrid....the hybrid wins.  With the hybrid I carried 20lb panniers and had Schwalbe Marathon 32 tires.  The Schwalbes were great...no punctures and rolled well.

Offline dubovsmj

Re: New to Touring
« Reply #9 on: May 28, 2009, 09:47:56 am »
as far as the fuji bike goes...i've had a fuji roubaix 2002 model...it used to be my racing bike until i started touring and converted it into a touring bike.....if you put some fatter tires on it it works great in handling a full load....add a brooks saddle and it's even better ride.....i had to latch on a seat post rack seein it didn't have the attachments for normal racks....changed out the shifters to bar end shifters..i've also used a b.o.b. trailer on it and it handles it real well...so, i'm just sayin with a little tweeking you can turn that bike into a perfectly fine touring bike...not sure what type of fuji you have, but the roubaix is aluminum frame with carbon fiber fork.....i've taken it on pretty rough dirt roads for about 15 mile stretches with full load and it works fine...not as rough a ride as i initially thought would be.  good luck!

Offline cristiano

Re: New to Touring
« Reply #10 on: May 29, 2009, 02:22:13 am »
Nice to meet you again guys.I road the C&O last fall (DC to Cumberland MD), along with the connection to Pittsburgh from Cumberland Maryland. Thank you.
_______________________________
www.floatingtank.at
andro