Author Topic: older riders  (Read 26395 times)

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Offline mikedirectory2

Re: older riders
« Reply #45 on: August 19, 2009, 01:48:13 pm »
I just want to say that you are all an inspiration.  I hope that I can continue riding for the rest of my life!
May the skies be blue and the road be flat... Happy Riding.

Offline MTNGator

Re: older riders
« Reply #46 on: August 19, 2009, 06:45:58 pm »
I'm a 59-year old, this is my first post on this forum, cancer survivor who has always dreamed of the long tour but put it off for career, family and other obligations. Well the bucket list demands more than dreaming so I'm doing the "state ride" next year on my Cannondale T2000 and then who knows???

I can attest to some of the other issues raised here - especially the "bike fit" comment. My 1987 Cannondale fit great "out-of-the-box" but the same size frame in 2005 has been a disappointment. A lot of stems and seat posts have not yet produced the perfect fit but I'm still working on it.

Nice to be here on the forum and looking at the grass from the green side. Ed

Offline justbarb

Re: older riders
« Reply #47 on: August 21, 2009, 07:48:51 pm »
What a joy to read about older riders and their experiences!  And I see that a few of you may have been able to get together for some tours...wonderful!  I am about to go on my first "official" tour, as my Raleigh Sojourn now has a front rack, a tent and other camping equipment has been purchased, and the work calendar may free me for a few days.  Let's continue to inspire each other with our experiences!

Offline mainebiker

Re: older riders
« Reply #48 on: August 26, 2009, 03:22:38 pm »
I am 68 and started riding and wrenching in 2004 to help me beat cancer. Have been cancer free since I started riding--so I better not stop. I ride every day and use the touring bike I built up from a frameset to run errands, shop, etc. I also have three road bikes. My wife and I are currently caring for her 86 year old father---so getting away to go touring is out for the time being. To keep my mind off caregiving, I started a bike repair shop. I have almost every Park Tool in the catalog. People here donate unwanted bikes and I restore them and give them to the Y. They always seem to find a person who can use a bike. I have done 30 bikes in the past two years. Am now working on two 3 speeds--a Raleigh and a Free Spirit. Finding people my age to ride with is hard. We have a bicycle club here that I belong to, but can`t do their rides--they run pacelines and average 18 to 20. They are also in their 30`s and 40`s.

Offline scott.laughlin

Re: older riders
« Reply #49 on: August 27, 2009, 11:09:14 am »
I am 68 and started riding and wrenching in 2004 to help me beat cancer. Have been cancer free since I started riding--so I better not stop. I ride every day and use the touring bike I built up from a frameset to run errands, shop, etc. I also have three road bikes. My wife and I are currently caring for her 86 year old father---so getting away to go touring is out for the time being. To keep my mind off caregiving, I started a bike repair shop. I have almost every Park Tool in the catalog. People here donate unwanted bikes and I restore them and give them to the Y. They always seem to find a person who can use a bike. I have done 30 bikes in the past two years. Am now working on two 3 speeds--a Raleigh and a Free Spirit. Finding people my age to ride with is hard. We have a bicycle club here that I belong to, but can`t do their rides--they run pacelines and average 18 to 20. They are also in their 30`s and 40`s.
==================
I'm 72 and I ride nearly every day.  It's what keeps me going.  At our age it is difficult to find folks with whom to ride.  But I'm satisfied to go it alone.  I remember a group of club riders passing me by one morning.  I overheard one say, "Why's he going so slow?"  If I could have caught up to him I would have suggested he wait another 50 years then ask that question again  :-)

Offline conifir

Re: older riders
« Reply #50 on: August 27, 2009, 03:14:37 pm »
i will be 60 in this coming winter
when i was younger i lived on my road racing swiss made 10 speed....
it was a gas....
going as fast as you could....
took a few tumbles....
back in the fall of 2002 i bought a trek full suspension mtb
i wanted a full suspension for the comfort....
you know the drill ....all of the little aches and pains
after fussing around with the bike since then...
going on daily rides...
smelling the fresh air....
watching the asphalt or dirt wizz bye
sweating up a storm
feeling good..
i started looking into ultra-lite bicycle equipment
such as frame bags
handlebar harness , etc...
so after a couple of hundred smackers
i had a complete ultra-lite set up custom made for my trek fuel
now i have this dream
of hitting the open road
my total weight that i will be carrying is 35 lbs
i will be totally self supported..
i had my bags made by this guy out of alaska   www.epicdesignsalaska.com
check out his equipment that he makes...
be safe

Offline johnsondasw

Re: older riders
« Reply #51 on: August 31, 2009, 12:06:12 pm »
Probably my main piece of advise for us older riders is to mix it up.  It's important to have other athletic interests.  I use hiking, weights, and rock climbing in addition to road biking.  If I get too obsessed with any one of these, I start to hurt.  Changing activities is a good way to take a "rest" day, although there are times I take a real rest day, too.  I have friends my age (almost 61) who are interested in only one activity, and they seem to be dealing with an injury most of the time.  A regular stretching routine also makes me feel better.

It is especially dangerous for an older person who has not been active at all, and suddenly decides to "get in shape", so he/she abruptly jumps in with an intense schedule of biking or any other active sport.  That's an injury waiting to happen.  Even though I had been very active my whole life, I found this out when I started a new sport, technical rock climbing, at age 45.  Within about a year, I got shoulder tendinitis that took 8 months to heal, and then only with the help of a cortisone shot.  In the winter, that shoulder still stiffens up, and it appears I'll be dealing with it for life.     

There are books out there for older athletes that are worth reading.  I've found a few.  "Cycling Past 50" has important info, and I'm sure there are others.
May the wind be at your back!

Offline justbarb

Re: older riders
« Reply #52 on: August 31, 2009, 07:43:11 pm »
I agree with "mixing it up," and walk as much as possible and swim laps.  Our gov't has a free publication titled "Exercise: A Guide from the National Institute on Aging."  Go to www.nia.nih.gov to get one.  And I want to continue the main topic of older riders, as that is this thread's topic.  I am just about to take off on my first solo trip...nothing big, just a few days...but I am very excited to do something that I have dreamed about for so long.

Offline johnsondasw

Re: older riders
« Reply #53 on: August 31, 2009, 08:14:46 pm »
Go for it!  "Just a few days"  can be a great adventure in itself and the inspiration for longer trips to come.
May the wind be at your back!

Offline tonythomson

Re: older riders
« Reply #54 on: September 01, 2009, 02:50:48 pm »
Hi justbarb let us know how you get on.  Bet you have a great time and it is just as exciting heading out on a new trip regardless as to how many times you have done it before.  I have done several long hauls before but still get unbearable excited plus quite a bit of anxiety mixed in like "can I do this".  But just heading out that first morning there is no other feeling quite like it.

I'm sure I'm not the only who feels like this - am I?
Just starting to record my trips  www.tonystravels.com

Offline johnsondasw

Re: older riders
« Reply #55 on: September 01, 2009, 11:31:46 pm »
I think most of us feel that way.  That's why we're on this forum.
May the wind be at your back!

Offline longjohn

Re: older riders
« Reply #56 on: September 04, 2009, 05:52:20 am »
When they first opened the trail all the way through from Washinton DC to Pittsburgh I had to do it.  I remember those feelings of "Can I do this?" as I was riding the train to Washington.  It was an exciting feeling, knowing when I got off the train and put my bike back together I was on my own for 350 miles.  I had to be back at work in six days.  On the train ride to Washington I met a group of riders that had just completed the ride and they took eight days to do it.  It gave me an uneasy feeling knowing I had to complete it in two days shorter time than they did.  My first day I rode hard all day and put in enough miles to know I could do it.  The rest of the ride I took my time and finished in five days. I was 57 years old when I made that ride.  It's a good feeling to know what you are able to do. :D

Offline GeorgeC

Re: older riders
« Reply #57 on: September 05, 2009, 06:18:05 pm »
I just wanted to add to a previous post I made on this topic.

I just got home from a three day "short" tour, one day of which was on the UGRR. This was my first fully loaded ride and it took a few miles to become comfortable with the way the bike handled, but after that the rest of the ride was a wonderful experience.

All the months of looking at the pictures in the Adventure Cyclist magazine, reading about other peoples experiences, and dreaming about what it would be like and now I have experienced the thrill of being on the road for myself. It almost makes you feel like a kid again and that is worth a million bucks right there.

71 is not too late to start, but oh how I wish I had tried this 20 years ago.

Offline justbarb

Re: older riders
« Reply #58 on: September 06, 2009, 05:34:37 pm »
Congratulations, George!  Your first tour must have been a blast.  Seems to me that your first tour was at the "right" age, since it's the age you are.  I can relate to "feel like a child again", as I almost feel giddy while complete the preparation to set out on the 15th.

What part of the UGGR did you do? Any problems?  Thanks for inspiring the rest of us!


Offline GeorgeC

Re: older riders
« Reply #59 on: September 10, 2009, 12:28:15 pm »
Congratulations, George!  Your first tour must have been a blast.  Seems to me that your first tour was at the "right" age, since it's the age you are.  I can relate to "feel like a child again", as I almost feel giddy while complete the preparation to set out on the 15th.

What part of the UGGR did you do? Any problems?  Thanks for inspiring the rest of us!



I live in the north end of Columbus and only 1.6 miles from a bike path that will take me 14 miles north without any road riding. From there I rode on local roads to Delaware and then to the state park campgrounds for a total of 40 miles on Thursday. Friday, I rode back to Delaware and followed the UGRR route to Fredericktown and on to the Kokosing Camp for 50+ miles. Saturday, I rode back home on the UGRR to Kilbourne and then local roads the rest of the way for a total of 56+ miles. Problems? None. It was a great time and a great experience.