Author Topic: Best GPS  (Read 8221 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline fatbikerider

Best GPS
« on: September 09, 2009, 08:48:36 pm »
can anyone tell me the best, cheapest and easiest GPS to use for bicyclists? I know best and cheap is a oxi-moron, but hey I'm a hillbilly :)

Thanks for the help
Paul

Offline Fred Hiltz

Re: Best GPS
« Reply #1 on: September 10, 2009, 07:09:10 am »
Nope! You can get a lot of opinions about what each of us finds works best. Without saying your budget, where you want to take it, how long, and how regular your access to electric outlets will be, no one can even guess at what is best for you.

You can learn the "lay of the land" by browsing this group, particularly the Basic GPS threads, and at http://gpsinformation.net/, where the first three articles comprise an excellent introduction. There you will find links to just about everything in the consumer GPS world.

Please write back with specific questions if you don't find what you need in these places.

Fred

Offline fatbikerider

Re: Best GPS
« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2009, 07:44:40 pm »
Thanks Fred, I will check out the link you provided. Then if I have any questions I will get back with you....thanks again

Offline pptouring

Re: Best GPS
« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2009, 09:17:25 am »
Well .... here is my $.02! I've been using a Garmin eTrex Vista Cx for a couple years without any issues and this past summer, I bought a second one (eTrex Hcx). Used it for my Germany/Czech tour without any issues.

My Cx has seen action deep in the Pisgah National Forest and other parts of NC & TN forest during MTB races and it works awesome. When I'm not using it on the bikes, I have it mounted either to my kayak or rucksack.

Offline MikeJ

Re: Best GPS
« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2010, 06:11:04 am »
The Garmin GPSmap 60CSX is my personal favorite. It is rugged, survives drops/crashes, very water resistant, tough display, acquires signal fast, good reception under canopy, long battery life (2x rechargeable AA), accepts optional external antenna, has MicroSD card (max 2GB), all of the features (data/displays) you would expect for cycling & navigation, mounts well on handlebar, USB connection for import/export, customizable settings/displays, lots of misc/fun stuff, etc.

If you want cadence or heart rate and have the additional sensors - look at the Garmin Edge 705 ($400). However, I don't think it is as durable.

You would also be fine with the earlier model, the Garmin GPSmap 60CS. They are virtually the same.
Primary differences:
- CSX has color screen
- CSX has removable microSD (CS only stores 10,000 points in active log and simplifies saved logs)
- CSX has upgraded GPS sensor (faster acquire, better under canopy/urban valleys)

However these differences do not really impact the average user. If you don't need detailed logs with more than 10,000 points or want to load color imagery, which is not easy anyway, you would be very happy with the CS.

I have been using both models since they were released, and none have failed or ended up in the unused gadget drawer. I use them instead of a cycling computer/speedometer.

You can find both models online. The CSX is about $250. You might be able to find a CS for $150.

Tip: Use the provided lanyard when bar mounted. Wrap the lanyard around the handlebar and pull the GPS unit through the loop as a sort of safety line. This is a necessary backup in case of big bumps that can cause the unit to pop out of its bar mount. If not secured with the lanyard, the unit can pop out and fly across the road into traffic. With the lanyard, it will merely dangle from the bars and avoid potential damage. It's only done this 3 or 4 times over the last few years. The first two times the unit wasn't secured and landed hard on the pavement at speed - but no damage!

Offline funcycle21

Re: Best GPS
« Reply #5 on: January 27, 2010, 06:12:23 pm »
ive tried the garmin 705 for cadence and heart rate, was awesome. just recently I got a polar cs600x, so far its unbelievable, got a gps with it.
-Miami cyclist: Polar heart rate monitors? I use em...


Polar heart rate monitors progress

Offline mucknort

Re: Best GPS
« Reply #6 on: January 28, 2010, 11:22:39 am »
Has anyone tried using a GPS app with an iphone???

Offline jacostrydom

Re: Best GPS
« Reply #7 on: January 29, 2010, 02:09:38 am »
The best option for cycling is of course the Garmin Edge 705. A cheap option is the new Garmin Dakota 10.

Offline Fred Hiltz

Re: Best GPS
« Reply #8 on: January 29, 2010, 07:47:41 am »
The best option for cycling is of course the Garmin Edge 705. A cheap option is the new Garmin Dakota 10.
Good for local riding, but not for touring. Search this group for Edge to see why and learn from others who have tried it.

Fred

Offline Fred Hiltz

Re: Best GPS
« Reply #9 on: January 29, 2010, 08:54:05 am »
Has anyone tried using a GPS app with an iphone???
No reports here yet, but some comparison of it and stand-alone receivers in the thread "Garmin How To Upload Maps (waypoint) to Device - OR - Why buy Garmin?"

Fred

Offline John Nelson

Re: Best GPS
« Reply #10 on: January 29, 2010, 09:59:08 am »
Has anyone tried using a GPS app with an iphone???
I have used it with my Droid, but it suck power rapidly, so it's really not feasible unless you have at least daily access to recharging.

Offline aggie

Re: Best GPS
« Reply #11 on: January 29, 2010, 11:44:17 am »
I've used a Garmin 705 on several tours and it has worked just fine.  I get about 12 hours of battery life between charges.  I use either a solar powered recharger, a battery powered recharger, or plug in recharger depending on the situation.  The same chargers also recharge my phone.  It's a personal preference and I like being able to do a search for services (hotel, food, bike shop, etc) in areas I'm not familiar.  A gps is just like any other piece of equipment on a bike - some will love it and some will hate it. 

Offline Fred Hiltz

Re: Best GPS
« Reply #12 on: January 30, 2010, 08:17:19 am »
Interesting! Aggie, did you use turn-by-turn navigation along the routes? If you did, how well does the 705 take you along the route you want, given its lack of intermediate via points? I need via points in my 60CS to direct its little brain to the bike routes. It prefers automobile routes.

Also, is the limit of 100 waypoints a problem on your tours? The ACA routes contain 2,000 to 3,000 each, so you must have had to reload the 705 quite often. Do you carry a computer?

Fred

Offline aggie

Re: Best GPS
« Reply #13 on: January 30, 2010, 11:47:35 am »
I didn't use waypoints.  I used the ACA maps.  The gps was great when you go off the ACA route page.  I could find services that weren't listed on the route guide and then find my way back to the route if necessary.  I could also display a good sized map so if I could remember several turns I could see when I was there.  This was especially nice for areas where the roads weren't well marked.

I now carry a small net book and I have another map program on it so I can look at it at night to see what's on the route ahead or if I want to take another detour.

I always carry maps.  Anything electronic could fail and "paper" maps are my insurance I'll be able to find my way.

Offline Fred Hiltz

Re: Best GPS
« Reply #14 on: January 31, 2010, 07:39:37 am »
Thanks, Aggie. +1 for the paper maps. I got a netbook too and think it is Asus' great gift to cyclists.

Fred