Author Topic: Seat Problem  (Read 5350 times)

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Offline francois

Seat Problem
« on: September 26, 2009, 02:16:35 pm »
Hello, we are looking for tips on how to find the right seat for extended riding. We tried many, but after 2-3 hours, they are very uncomfortable.
Any suggestions?

Offline habanero

Re: Seat Problem
« Reply #1 on: September 26, 2009, 03:17:35 pm »
I've tried many saddles over the past 30 years, and the Fizik Alliante with carbon fiber rails is the most comfortable for me.

Offline DaveB

Re: Seat Problem
« Reply #2 on: September 26, 2009, 06:09:26 pm »
Saddles are like spouses, there is no one-size-fits-all.  For every report on a saddle that the rider is in love with, you will find someone else who hates it.

Part of the problem is having the saddle height and tilt correct and having the bike set up so your weight is divided between the saddle and the bars.  If you are very upright with all of your weight on the saddle, it's unlikely you will ever find one that's long-term comfortable.

Offline DNault

Re: Seat Problem
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2009, 09:29:12 pm »
I saw one of these saddles this weekend and having saddle issues myself, thought it might be worth a try. I know it's ugly but if it's comfy you might just come to find it's inner beauty.




http://www.ismseat.com/products_touring.htm

Online johnsondasw

Re: Seat Problem
« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2009, 11:31:18 pm »
As mentioned earlier, seat tilt is important--it must be level.  Also, not mentioned yet, good cycling make all the difference.  I've tried a lot of different types and finally settled on ones that I really like.  However, I have to pay close to $100 a pair.  It's worth it, though, considering I get several thousand miles out of a pair.
May the wind be at your back!

Offline whittierider

Re: Seat Problem
« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2009, 11:50:52 pm »
Quote
Also, not mentioned yet, good cycling make all the difference.

From the context, it looks like you meant to put the word "shorts" after "cycling."  Is that right?

I get away just fine with cheap shorts, but I insist that the pad not be very thick, and not be sculpted.  It must not have ridges and so on, but be smooth instead.

The comment about seats being very individual is so true.  If it's shaped right for you, it is neither necessary nor desirable to have much padding, as the padding just pushes up into, and compresses, soft areas where it should not.  But what works well for one person could be terrible for another.  I also have found no correlation between price and comfort or durability.  The saddle I'm on now is the narrowest, hardest, lightest, longest-lasting, and one of the cheapest saddles I've ever had, yet also nearly the most comfortable-- for me.

And it's not clear if you know this, but cycling shorts are made to be used without underwear.  Don't wear underwear with them, or you defeat their purpose of not sitting on seems and wrinkles.  There are also several products to put in the shorts to prevent saddleburn, ranging from some specifically made for the purpose, like Butt'r, to more general products like petroleum jelly and Bag Balm.  Use it very liberally.
« Last Edit: October 12, 2009, 11:52:39 pm by whittierider »

Online johnsondasw

Re: Seat Problem
« Reply #6 on: October 13, 2009, 11:05:25 pm »
Sorry, yes good cycling shorts! 
May the wind be at your back!

Offline mikedirectory2

Re: Seat Problem
« Reply #7 on: October 14, 2009, 04:59:58 pm »
I think it really does depend on the individual, sometimes you just have to keep trying. 
May the skies be blue and the road be flat... Happy Riding.

Offline indyfabz

Re: Seat Problem
« Reply #8 on: October 15, 2009, 12:45:29 pm »
I addition to tilt, comfort can be affected by the fore-after postion of the saddle.  You need to try to get your sits bones in the right position on the saddle.  Try getting some bike fitting help from a knowledgeable shop.  Some shops will let you test ride saddles,  If so, make sure you know the "fine print."  For example, some shops require you to pay for the test saddle.  If you don't like it, you can exchange it for something else, but ultimately you will have to buy one from them with the money you put down up front.

For me, the Terry Liberator is my saddle of choice for touring.  The wide profile fits me well.  But others are correct.  What works for one doesn't alway work for another.

Offline mucknort

Re: Seat Problem
« Reply #9 on: October 22, 2009, 09:41:34 pm »
For years I tried every type of seat and position, to no avail. I now ride a recumbent and even after 100 miles or more in a day I feel no pain.

Offline bogiesan

Re: Seat Problem
« Reply #10 on: October 24, 2009, 09:28:30 am »
For years I tried every type of seat and position, to no avail. I now ride a recumbent and even after 100 miles or more in a day I feel no pain.

What do we know that no one else wants to hear?
This allows recumbent tourers to remain a tightly closed brother/sisterhood.
High definition bicycling, designed with the behind in mind!

david boise ID


I play go. I use Macintosh. Of course I ride a recumbent

Offline staehpj1

Re: Seat Problem
« Reply #11 on: October 24, 2009, 10:24:03 am »
Not knocking Brooks saddles or recumbents, but I am not a fan of either.  I guess I am weird, but I am comfortable on an upright bike's saddle and find chairs, sofa's and recumbent seats to hurt after a while.  The Brooks models, for me, are just "OK" but nothing special comfort wise and not worth the extra weight.  We all use what works for us.

My point is that any style of bike or saddle has a different set of advantages and disadvantages and every human is different as well.  There are no universal best answers.

Offline whittierider

Re: Seat Problem
« Reply #12 on: October 24, 2009, 01:36:24 pm »
Quote
and find chairs, sofa's and recumbent seats to hurt after a while.
and even car seats, some more than others.  We rented a Toyota Corolla a few months ago and its driver's seat was starting to get pretty painful even in the first hour.  Hours 2 and 3 were really bad, and I kept shifting around, looking for relief.  I don't have that problem on my upright bike's narrow saddle.

Offline staehpj1

Re: Seat Problem
« Reply #13 on: October 24, 2009, 03:57:21 pm »
Quote
and find chairs, sofa's and recumbent seats to hurt after a while.
and even car seats, some more than others.  We rented a Toyota Corolla a few months ago and its driver's seat was starting to get pretty painful even in the first hour.  Hours 2 and 3 were really bad, and I kept shifting around, looking for relief.  I don't have that problem on my upright bike's narrow saddle.
Glad to hear that I am not the only one.  :)

hmoore71

  • Guest
Re: Seat Problem
« Reply #14 on: October 27, 2009, 05:53:29 pm »
Hello, we are looking for tips on how to find the right seat for extended riding. We tried many, but after 2-3 hours, they are very uncomfortable.
Any suggestions?

I do see some responses that really do answer your question of "how to find the right seat." And I will repeat and suggest looking at some of the variables and noting the differences changes in them make.

First have someone fit you to your bike to make sure everything is optimum in that department.
Second optimize the weight distribution between the butt and arms by adjusting the handle bar height.
Third try different saddles with different widths and note where your sit bones hit. You want the sit bones to hit before other parts do and carry your weight under compression.
In this process make sure the saddle nose is set so there isn't any interference and your sit bones remain solidly in position.

I don't think the type of saddle, leather or whatever makes all that much difference. I personally prefer my Brooks saddles but fit still is the most important thing to obtain even with them.
« Last Edit: October 27, 2009, 05:56:54 pm by hmoore71 »