Author Topic: Newbie with a dream  (Read 2532 times)

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Offline kaywayne23

Newbie with a dream
« on: October 20, 2009, 05:55:56 pm »
So here it is:
I have a dream, a dream that has already been dreamed by millions, but I still need your help
Dream:
May-june 2010 bike from placerville,ca to New York
Bike needed: Trek 520? I am 6'6 215lbs
Fitness backround: Work at a gym, and yes I do use it =P
Now what?
If you want to get me started on how you did it great!

Offline kaywayne23

Re: Newbie with a dream
« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2009, 05:58:29 pm »
Also I want to camp every night... I know this sounds cheesy and I could probably just open my hotel window, but I want to hear the wildlife at night, and deal with the fear of the abyss

Offline Westinghouse

Re: Newbie with a dream
« Reply #2 on: October 20, 2009, 08:01:35 pm »
A bike, equipment, time, maps and money are all you need. Put your feet in the pedals and move them in little circles. You will get there sooner or later.
It's an adventure.

Offline MrBent

Re: Newbie with a dream
« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2009, 09:29:37 am »
One problem leaving from Placerville is that in May, the Morman Immigrant Trail, the best way over the pass, could be covered with snow.  Some have ridden Hwy 50, but I can't recommend it.  If you decide to go that way, a really early Sunday, maybe Monday morning might be the way to go.

As for the rest?  Read up on threads for newbies on this forum.  Go to Crazyguyonabike.com and read up there a little, get that bike and get it properly fit.  Many people find Brooks saddles to be the best, so get one soon to break it in.  Do a bunch of riding to break yourself in.  Get on bike, leave town!

Have a blast.

Scott

Offline tonythomson

Re: Newbie with a dream
« Reply #4 on: October 21, 2009, 12:09:55 pm »
HI KW
the guys above will always give you good sound advise and are a great source of info.  I certainly appreciate what they say, in the end you just go for it and all the fears, doubts etc will melt away if you ride within your comfort zone.  My only bit of advise would be to get a good mirror fitted so you know exactly who is coming up behind you, this to me is one of the best ways to remain safe and able to control the road! or get out of the way.
Good luck Tony
Just starting to record my trips  www.tonystravels.com

Offline John Nelson

Re: Newbie with a dream
« Reply #5 on: October 21, 2009, 03:13:56 pm »
It's hard to know what to say since we have no idea what you already know and have and what you don't know and have. Start with Bicycle Touring 101 and then come back with any specific questions:

http://www.adventurecycling.org/features/biketouring101.cfm

Offline kaywayne23

Re: Newbie with a dream
« Reply #6 on: October 22, 2009, 04:51:34 pm »
Well I do have a question: actually many!
I want a trek 520, but they only make it to 60cm and I am 6'6 1/2
HELP!

Offline John Nelson

Re: Newbie with a dream
« Reply #7 on: October 22, 2009, 10:59:49 pm »
So maybe the Trek 520 isn't for you.

But there are many, many other good touring bikes out there. Check here for a list with specs.

http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=558172
« Last Edit: October 22, 2009, 11:02:03 pm by John Nelson »

Offline bogiesan

Re: Newbie with a dream
« Reply #8 on: October 24, 2009, 09:24:45 am »
> I want a trek 520, but they only make it to 60cm and I am 6'6 1/2 HELP!<

This is just one notch short of "If I can't have this bike, I won't go." An inauspicious start.

I don't know anything about upright touring bikes except what I read in Adventure Cyclist magazine. Their buying guides are essential reading if you are going to invest in a bicycle. Specific recommendations for brands and models must be regarded carefully; there are hundreds of excellent bikes and no one knows what might fit your tastes and physical presence.

I always recommend a recumbent for people who think they want to tour but never have. The difference in the touring experience, what we call high definition bicycling, is almost impossible to communicate. Fortunately for those of us who ride recumbents, not everyone is capable of appreciating the difference so we remain a tightly closed brother/sisterhood. When I'm done riding a hundred miles, I'm as tired as everyone else is, but, when I climb off my rolling lounge chair, nothing on my 55-year old body hurts and, man, that means a lot to me.

david boise ID




I play go. I use Macintosh. Of course I ride a recumbent