Author Topic: Oregon Trail  (Read 1619 times)

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Offline sidburg

Oregon Trail
« on: December 13, 2009, 09:37:19 pm »
I'm eager for information about Historical Trails Cycling.  They have been leading an Oregon Trail tour every other year. I was hoping to make the 2010, but this group seems to have disappeared.  Old address, historicaltrailscycling.com, comes up empty. 

Offline JMilyko

Re: Oregon Trail
« Reply #1 on: December 14, 2009, 08:05:26 am »
You must have caught the website in the midst of maintenance or something, http://www.historicaltrailscycling.com/ comes up for me.

.Jennifer.
*_*_*_*_*_*_*_*_*_*_*

Jennifer H. Milyko
Adventure Cycling Association
Inspiring and empowering people to travel by bicycle.
800/755-2453, 406/721-1776 x205
www.adventurecycling.org

Follow Routes & Mapping on Twitter: @acaroutes

Offline scott.laughlin

Re: Oregon Trail
« Reply #2 on: December 17, 2009, 03:24:02 pm »
I'm eager for information about Historical Trails Cycling.  They have been leading an Oregon Trail tour every other year. I was hoping to make the 2010, but this group seems to have disappeared.  Old address, historicaltrailscycling.com, comes up empty. 

Fifteen years ago I bought a book called *Maps of the Oregon Trail* by Gregary M. Franzwa.  It's nearly 300 pages of detailed maps.  Much of the trail is located on private property.  It's like following Route 66--hit and miss.  My suggestion would be to check you local library to see if you can look at that book before you invest $700.

Near Baker City Oregon there's a place that looks like a four-foot-deep dry creek bed, but the sign identifies it as the Oregon Trail.  I knew where the picture was I'd send it to you.  Onjloy the handbars of my Bike Friday are visible.

Scott

Offline roadrunner

Re: Oregon Trail
« Reply #3 on: December 22, 2009, 02:57:32 pm »
Sidburg -- I did a self-contained tour of the Oregon Trail route in 2001 from Kansas City to Oregon City riding roads nearest the original trail.  It's a great route, with many historical sites, good scenery, and mostly light traffic.  "Traveling the Oregon Trail," by Julie Fanselow, is an excellent reference for touring the trail.  Written for driving the route, it describes the trail's history, has maps of the trail and nearby roads, and lists lodging, campgrounds, and restaurants in towns along the route.  The book is available from Amazon.com for about $10.

If you'd be interested in riding the trail on your own, I'd be happy to e-mail you the itinerary and journal of my tour.