Author Topic: maximum weight  (Read 4447 times)

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Offline corey

maximum weight
« on: February 09, 2010, 04:07:45 pm »
looking to buy a bike for cross country trip and bike manufacturers do not list max loads their bikes can carry. i must know this detail before buying . internet shopping is frustrating because of this . what company list this important detail for i will be carrying alot of gear ? please help

Offline mucknort

Re: maximum weight
« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2010, 04:14:22 pm »
Most decent touring bikes should handle at least 50#s of gear, but if you are going for huge loads I'd suggest considering a trailer. Here's 2 I like:

Burley Nomad
http://www.biketrailershop.com/catalog/500-burley-nomad-wsetup-options-p-151.html

Quik-Pak
http://www.quik-pak.com/
http://www.biketrailershop.com/catalog/quikpak-trailers-c-85.html

Offline whittierider

Re: maximum weight
« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2010, 04:19:54 pm »
I'm sure any bike can carry quite a bit more than the available racks can.

Offline MrWaves

Re: maximum weight
« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2010, 04:24:00 pm »
Yup - I've been thinking what to do as I intend to ride the GDMBR with large sections solo - so full camping gear. The suggestion I have got was to use the Bob Yak or Bob Ibex trailer - http://www.bobgear.com/trailers/ and couple that with a 29er hardtail mountain bike. Looks like its easy to ride but I don't like the idea of the extra weight. What is other peoples experience?

Offline Cyclesafe

Re: maximum weight
« Reply #4 on: February 09, 2010, 06:36:06 pm »
Trailer v. pannier is the oldest conversation on this and any other touring forum.  Try seaching because nobody knowledgeable will answer anymore.  Elsewhere on this site, ACA had some information too.

Caution on the trailer, tho.  If you get a 29er, make sure you get the proper 28" fork for it.  Yes, no typo; 29er, 28", and 700c are all the same inside rim diameter.
Hoping to do the North Star with ACA in 2014.

Offline mucknort

Re: maximum weight
« Reply #5 on: February 10, 2010, 10:02:40 am »
]I wasn't trying to hijack or start another trailer vs pannier debate. :o The OP stated she/he wanted weight limits of bikes and wasn't having success finding this info. I threw out the trailer idea because the OP said, "for i will be carrying alot of gear". Trailers allow you to carry much more (especially 2 wheeled trailers) without putting much weight on the bike. I've seen a # of folks touring with a lightweight racing bike pulling a trailer.

So, in direct answer to "corey"'s question, "what company list this important detail" I submit the website of my favorite touring bike manufacturer. The max loaded weight is given in the specs section of every bike they make: http://www.ransbikes.com/default.htm
The models I'd recommend would be the Zenetik, Stratus LE, or Stratus XP. The max. weight listed for these bikes is 275 pounds.

Now, here's hoping "corey" doesn't start a new thread every time she/he posts a reply. :-\
« Last Edit: February 10, 2010, 11:12:53 am by mucknort »

Offline johnsondasw

Re: maximum weight
« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2010, 08:36:50 pm »
I've seen a # of folks touring with a lightweight racing bike pulling a trailer.



I'm one of those number of guys you see with a CF lightweight bike pulling a trailer.  It's great, and I doubt I'll go back to heavier bikes with heave loads, making them cumbersome to handle.
May the wind be at your back!

Offline John Nelson

Re: maximum weight
« Reply #7 on: February 21, 2010, 11:13:48 am »
I see that the Rans Hammertruck has a weight limit of 525 pounds. Almost all of their bikes have a weight limit of at least 275 pounds.

Offline bogiesan

Re: maximum weight
« Reply #8 on: February 25, 2010, 08:27:14 am »
looking to buy a bike for cross country trip and bike manufacturers do not list max loads their bikes can carry. i must know this detail before buying . internet shopping is frustrating because of this . what company list this important detail for i will be carrying alot of gear ? please help

All touring bikes include clearly explained weight capacities so you're looking at non-touring bikes?

I wouldn't buy a bike on the Net but I'd do some careful research online. You really want to get your touring bike from and assembled by a bike shop.

david boise ID
I play go. I use Macintosh. Of course I ride a recumbent

Offline indyfabz

Re: maximum weight
« Reply #9 on: February 25, 2010, 10:47:44 am »
"All touring bikes include clearly explained weight capacities so you're looking at non-touring bikes?"

I don't this information for the LHT on the Surly web site, biut maybe I am missing something?

Offline hem

Re: maximum weight
« Reply #10 on: February 25, 2010, 11:37:31 am »
All touring bikes include clearly explained weight capacities so you're looking at non-touring bikes?
david boise ID
I just don't ever recall seeing any bike listing its maximum carrying weight, not that they don't. I just don't recall seeing that specification.
I have seen maximum carrying weights for racks though but that is about it.
Now Bruce Gordon does have a heavier tubing which he recommends for heavier customers.

I wonder how the manufacturers qualify that specification? Under what road conditions? Weight distribution? Speed? seems like a sticky wicket to me.

Offline paddleboy17

Re: maximum weight
« Reply #11 on: February 25, 2010, 12:09:21 pm »
All touring bikes include clearly explained weight capacities so you're looking at non-touring bikes?

I wouldn't buy a bike on the Net but I'd do some careful research online. You really want to get your touring bike from and assembled by a bike shop.

david boise ID
My experience towing a BOB trailer with my Paramount critereum bike is that I found it to be so scary, I never ever did it again.  If you want to tow a BOB trailer, you need a longer wheel base.

As for weight specs...

Most commercially available touring bikes are light touring bikes.  This means credit card touring.  The frame probably won't immediately break if you put rider and gear on it, but it may wiggle.  I did not like riding a wiggling frame, although it was excellent active feedback for quieting my upper body movement.

This is why they sell heavy touring bikes: Bruce Gordon, Waterford, Co-Motion, just to name a few.

So how can you figure out what to buy?  I don't think you can do this over the Internet, unless you know what you are doing.  You have to work through you local bike shop, and that means getting a local bike shop that you trust.  I am not saying this is easy, because not too many bike shops have someone on staff that tours.  And you have to have a local bike shop that you trust to fit the bike properly to you.

Perhaps the original question should have been "I am looking for a bike for a cross country trip, are there any recommendations?"
Danno

Offline Spokey

Re: maximum weight
« Reply #12 on: February 26, 2010, 09:29:20 am »
A couple years ago I weighed my bags.  Don't remember the distribution but it was about 55 lbs.  If I add tent weight, that probably brings it up to about 60.  This is on a comotion which is a pretty tough bird with a 48 hole rear and 40 front. 

The racks are Jandd.  Expedition rear and Extreme front.  I think they are rated on the Jandd site.

Offline rvklassen

Re: maximum weight
« Reply #13 on: March 03, 2010, 01:37:13 pm »
looking to buy a bike for cross country trip and bike manufacturers do not list max loads their bikes can carry. i must know this detail before buying . internet shopping is frustrating because of this . what company list this important detail for i will be carrying alot of gear ? please help
Your first point of failure will be wheels.  While you may find it hard to find weight limits for the bike, the frame is not likely to be your failure point.  You should have less trouble finding weight limits for wheels.  Bear in mind that you're likely to have 65-75% of the total weight (bike, rider, gear) on the rear wheel.

Offline Westinghouse

Re: maximum weight
« Reply #14 on: March 10, 2010, 09:17:34 pm »
I did a 4500 mile tour over tough roads carrying 60-65 pounds of gear on some of the cheapest wheels and racks on the market. Wheels $25.00 each. Rear rack from Wal Mart $7.95. Front rack $15.00. No problem.