Author Topic: Nova Scotia with five year old on piccolo  (Read 1411 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline tandemandahalf

Nova Scotia with five year old on piccolo
« on: March 04, 2010, 11:18:45 pm »
Greetings.  We are looking for some detailed information on touring Nova Scotia, PEI, and/or Cape Breton.  We are experiences tourers, self-supported.  We would like to do a 7-8 day tour this July/August with our five year old in tow.  We will likely fly in to Halifax. Does anyone have suggestions on a great loop, about 40 - 50 miles/day.  We would like to see as much as possbile, we adore coasts, and we wouldn't mind a stopover day for some sea kayaking?  Anyone?  Thanks! 

Offline geegee

Re: Nova Scotia with five year old on piccolo
« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2010, 11:09:29 am »
For Nova Scotia, pick a route with the least traffic since most coastal roads have no shoulders and you have a child in tow. My suggestion for a 7-8 day trip would be to fly into Saint John, New Brunswick then take a ferry to Digby NS. From there, ride around the southern tip of Nova Scotia to Yarmouth and up towards Halifax where you can fly out. This coastal route (#1 and #3) is super scenic and historic, and the traffic is really light because the regular trucks and commercial traffic use the larger highways (#101 and #103). There is kayak rental at the Seaside Adjunct of Kejimkujik National Park where you can explore a large protected bay. Some interesting towns are Shelburne, an old privateers (pirates) centre, and Lunenburg, a UNESCO site. heading into Halifax, you can detour on the 333 to Peggy's Cove, which is an awesome place despite the tourist traffic, but again the road has no shoulders.

Riding in PEI can take a week in itself, so you may have to plan a separate trip. Same goes for Cape Breton, which I would save for a time when the kids can pedal their own weight up the hills :)

Offline tpejoe

Re: Nova Scotia with five year old on piccolo
« Reply #2 on: April 27, 2010, 01:14:29 am »
http://www.novascotia.com/en/home/gettinghereandaround/gettingaround/scenic_travelways/cabot_trail/map.aspx

Consider the Cabot Trail. The hills will provide you a challenge, but excellent views. Great campsites. A great ride to consider. Lots of uphill.

Offline rvklassen

Re: Nova Scotia with five year old on piccolo
« Reply #3 on: April 27, 2010, 10:45:36 am »
Greetings.  We are looking for some detailed information on touring Nova Scotia, PEI, and/or Cape Breton.  We are experiences tourers, self-supported.  We would like to do a 7-8 day tour this July/August with our five year old in tow.  We will likely fly in to Halifax. Does anyone have suggestions on a great loop, about 40 - 50 miles/day.  We would like to see as much as possbile, we adore coasts, and we wouldn't mind a stopover day for some sea kayaking?  Anyone?  Thanks! 
If you do go to PEI, cross by ferry.  The bridge is LONG and exposed.  Also, I agree that you shouldn't try to do PEI unless you can spend at least 3-4 days on the island.  Yes, you could spend a week there. 

Offline paddleboy17

Re: Nova Scotia with five year old on piccolo
« Reply #4 on: April 27, 2010, 01:41:50 pm »
I have ridden south from Peggy's Cove (outside Halifax).  There is an excellent place in Mahone Bay that rented Kayaks.  I only went as far south as Lunenberg.  The drivers were bike friendly, the roads were good, and there was a wide shoulder. 

I have also done the Cabot Trail on Cape Breton.  This is a three day ride, but I suppose you could improvise and cover more of the Island.  Yes it is hilly. 
Danno

Offline geegee

Re: Nova Scotia with five year old on piccolo
« Reply #5 on: April 27, 2010, 03:14:43 pm »
If you do go to PEI, cross by ferry.  The bridge is LONG and exposed. 

Cyclists are not allowed on the 17-kilometre Confederation bridge anyway (many attempt to, seeing it has nice wide shoulders, but are quickly caught because the bridge is well monitored and are promptly picked up, not sure if there is a fine). There is a shuttle for hikers and cyclists ($8 for cyclists) which is a van with a bike trailer.

The Confederation Trail is a 400 km rails-to-trails system that meanders through the island. The PEI railroad was a folly that bankrupted the island colony in the mid-1800s and forced it to join the Canadian confederation for a bail out.