Author Topic: Novice cyclist's math  (Read 2252 times)

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Offline destination

Novice cyclist's math
« on: March 20, 2010, 06:30:33 pm »
1,000  miles minus going down hill minus the straight-a-ways = 500 miles real time biking?






Ps. "real" is not the word I wanted to use, but, I cant think of another word right now that would be better.
Just a thought that goes through a newbies mind.  :)
« Last Edit: March 20, 2010, 06:52:39 pm by destination »

Offline John Nelson

Re: Novice cyclist's math
« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2010, 10:53:37 pm »
I think it's an illogical question, like many others, such as how many miles biking equals one mile running. These are all apples-to-oranges comparisons. There are no answers.

Offline destination

Re: Novice cyclist's math
« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2010, 07:00:22 am »
Thank you for your reply, John. I had time to sleep on this thought. When a novice thinks about a long bike trip... One thinks of the work involved in getting from point A to point B.

Maybe another way to say it would be that the amount of work effort involved would be determined by the number of inclines. (The 50% comes into thought, because for every incline, there is hopefully a decline.)


I guess this does not apply for persons living in areas of relative flatness.
Woe is me. Training in a hilly area is mostly work.

Yes, I need to find a relatively flat area to train for the first two weeks.
« Last Edit: March 21, 2010, 07:06:53 am by destination »

Offline bogiesan

Re: Novice cyclist's math
« Reply #3 on: March 21, 2010, 09:17:25 am »
Can't tell if you're joking. This is neither arithmetic nor mathematics; it's physics.

> I had time to sleep on this thought. When a novice thinks about a long bike trip... One thinks of the work involved in
> getting from point A to point B.

Downhills are not free. If you're running panniers or lugging a trailer, you're working.

> Maybe another way to say it would be that the amount of work effort involved would be determined by the number of
> inclines. (The 50% comes into thought, because for every incline, there is hopefully a decline.)

Only on a loop does the elveation gain equal the elevation lost but the work, in foot/pounds, ergs, Watts, or Joules is never equal.

david boise ID
I play go. I use Macintosh. Of course I ride a recumbent

Offline destination

Re: Novice cyclist's math
« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2010, 09:31:19 am »
Not joking. Thank you for the physic's lesson, David.

Offline tonythomson

Re: Novice cyclist's math
« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2010, 11:39:51 am »
I think you might just find going down hill isn't all "down hill" for instance head winds! They can be brutal and sometimes you can get shelter while going uphill.  Probably have to concentrate harder on steep downhill sections.

My preference is cycling in hill/mountains as with flat ground you get that head wind and it's the same as climbing all day.

Just go out and pedal - enjoy whatever is in front of you.  Some bits more than others.  And have fun.

 
Just starting to record my trips  www.tonystravels.com

Offline destination

Re: Novice cyclist's math
« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2010, 01:19:24 pm »
Thank you Tony. I realized yesterday that it takes concentration going down hill, even though I was coasting. Especially when a wind is created just by going fast. You cant hear very well. I realized yesterday that even during the easy times that complete concentration is needed.

I hope I become that strong so I too can say: My preference is cycling in hill/mountains! Today is my rest day and Monday I look forward to getting out there again.






Offline tonythomson

Re: Novice cyclist's math
« Reply #7 on: March 21, 2010, 01:59:16 pm »
Where are you planning on doing your tour?  Atlantic Coast would be a fairly safe route to give you confidence as far as hills are concerned.  Or you could look at something like Great Yough..... River Trail and connect up to the C&O Canal Trail.  Check out Rails to Trails.

There are plenty of options if you are not too confident about tackling mountains.  Don't feel you have to get up them in one go - it's OK to stop and rest or walk.  Just make sure you are realistic in knowing how far you plan to travel and give yourself plenty of time.

Just starting to record my trips  www.tonystravels.com

Offline destination

Re: Novice cyclist's math
« Reply #8 on: March 21, 2010, 06:28:14 pm »
Lots of hurdles to get over before I can go anywhere with serious intentions.
Planning on just getting time in on the bike right now. Will see how I do this spring/summer
and will check in here at a later date.

Offline rvklassen

Re: Novice cyclist's math
« Reply #9 on: March 22, 2010, 10:14:52 am »
Not only is downhill not free.

Level isn't either.  Even without a headwind.  There's this nasty thing called rolling resistance.  And with zero wind you still have air resistance, since you're moving through the still air.  Only with a very strong tail wind do you have zero air resistance, and there's still some rolling resistance.

Offline geegee

Re: Novice cyclist's math
« Reply #10 on: March 22, 2010, 10:44:59 am »
In order to really enjoy a bike tour, it's best not to think about and over-analyze these things. There are so many things that affect the level of effort you need to exert in all kinds of terrain and weather. The most important thing is to go with an adjustable attitude  ;D

Offline destination

Re: Novice cyclist's math
« Reply #11 on: March 22, 2010, 11:34:33 am »
...and then there was the different feeling in the newly aired tires that I did not like. ... ;)

Geeg, are you saying that we are being a little bit analytical?  :)

I am glad that I am not alone :)

okay... gotta go. going to miss the camaraderie.

« Last Edit: March 23, 2010, 04:55:28 pm by destination »