Author Topic: Touring Shoes, Cleat Selection and Toe Clip Survey  (Read 5723 times)

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Offline waynemyer

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Re: Touring Shoes, Cleat Selection and Toe Clip Survey
« Reply #15 on: April 08, 2010, 03:30:57 pm »
I use Sidi Dominator 5 Mega with BeBop CrMo pedals.  I have clodhoppers and the Sidi wide shoe was the first one I ever tried that was really comfortable.

I formerly used Speedplay Frog pedals, but the cleats were wearing out within 1200 miles, no matter what I tried.  At $36 per set, that is a steep ride tax given that I put in about 350 miles per week.  I need the added float because SPD was wreaking havoc on my knees, despite multiple fittings and cleat cantings.

With regards to pain (and I used to have lots), I took the footbeds out of my shoes and removed the canting shims.  I have my cleats positioned just behind the ball of my foot.  I considered midfoot cleat mounting, but I don't have any major foot issues, even up to riding 24 hours straight.  If it ain't broke...
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Offline roadrunner

Re: Touring Shoes, Cleat Selection and Toe Clip Survey
« Reply #16 on: April 09, 2010, 11:18:50 pm »
I've tried several brands/types of touring cycling shoes, none of which were comfortable for walking and off-bike use.  I usually spend more time off the bike than on it when touring and don't want to carry an extra pair of shoes (other than flip-flops) for my size 12 feet.  The solution that works well for me is a pair of stiff-soled tennis shoes (mesh for hot weather, leather for cold) and Power Grips straps.  I added thin metal plates to cage pedals to distribute the foot pressure.  It's a low-tech system, but works great for me -- secure, comfortable, and no worries about mud or sand in cleats.

Offline Westinghouse

Re: Touring Shoes, Cleat Selection and Toe Clip Survey
« Reply #17 on: April 10, 2010, 02:11:41 pm »
Cannondale makes a good touring / walking shoe. About $80.00. It's all you need.

Offline jfitch

Re: Touring Shoes, Cleat Selection and Toe Clip Survey
« Reply #18 on: April 10, 2010, 10:21:04 pm »
"I formerly used Speedplay Frog pedals, but the cleats were wearing out within 1200 miles"

I use Frogs on everything -- I love the float -- but I also notice that the cleats seem to wear out awfully fast. How long do the BeBop cleats last?

Offline waynemyer

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Re: Touring Shoes, Cleat Selection and Toe Clip Survey
« Reply #19 on: April 11, 2010, 11:37:33 am »
I use Frogs on everything -- I love the float -- but I also notice that the cleats seem to wear out awfully fast. How long do the BeBop cleats last?
A touch over 5000 miles so far this year and so far everything is still holding well.  I lube the cleats once every two weeks because the cleat will squeak on the pedal in just-so weather conditions.  This is still better than Speedplay's suggestion of "after every ride."
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Offline dombrosk

Re: Touring Shoes, Cleat Selection and Toe Clip Survey
« Reply #20 on: April 11, 2010, 11:44:05 am »
After reading this thread, I was inspired to look into new shoes, and discovered at my local bike shop that Keen now makes an SPD compatible bike shoe in addition to their bike sandals.  Like other Keen shoes, it has a huge toe box and is very comfortable. 

Because I'm planning a European tour this summer it's a plus for me that it doesn't look like athletic equipment... I think this one shoe could work for riding during the day and dressing up a bit for dinner at night.

Here's more info:
http://www.keenfootwear.com/product/ss10/shoes/men/pedal/austin%20pedal/shitake


Offline Tourista829

Re: Touring Shoes, Cleat Selection and Toe Clip Survey
« Reply #21 on: April 11, 2010, 01:06:41 pm »
Westinghouse are the Cannondales you suggested spd's?  Those of you that use, spd's, eggbeaters, and some form of Speedplay Frogs, use your bike shoes for short trips to the store, after the days riding? Are there any platforms that clip onto the pedals so you can wear sandals or regular shoes? I noticed there are pedals that are one sided like the Shimano A520 & A530. How do you like them? Do you have any problems when you start up with gear?

Regarding wear, how often do you replace your shoes and cleats?  How often do you replace your pedals? Some of you already commented on 'The Frogs," thank you.

Not many use racing shoes because of the larger outboard cleat. Do they make race shoes with, for a lack of a better word, front and rear raised up tips, to compensate for the cleat and help with walking? (I suppose it would add weight, be less aerodynamic & or less stable to walk) 

I would love to also hear from people outside the USA too and learn if they use different systems and why. I know many in the UK still use touring shoes and toe clips. (although I am sure some already have responded) When I was in the Netherlands very few used cleats but they were commuting, shopping, and just plan riding.

Again, thanks for all of you who have responded so far. Encourage a friend to comment too. Bob :)

Offline rvklassen

Re: Touring Shoes, Cleat Selection and Toe Clip Survey
« Reply #22 on: April 12, 2010, 03:22:12 pm »
Regarding wear, how often do you replace your shoes and cleats? 
Shoes: I'm still on the first pair, after 10-15 years, and I expect to replace them next year.  Or the one after.
Cleats: Maybe two years.  Based on 2-3000 miles per year, mostly commuting.  I'd expect more touring miles per pair, as the wear is primarily from clipping in and out.
How often do you replace your pedals? Some of you already commented on 'The Frogs," thank you.
So far, once in my life, after about 20 years.  Properly maintained, pedals last and last.  These had seen one too many falls, and the dust caps could no longer be re-installed.
Not many use racing shoes because of the larger outboard cleat. Do they make race shoes with, for a lack of a better word, front and rear raised up tips, to compensate for the cleat and help with walking? (I suppose it would add weight, be less aerodynamic & or less stable to walk) 
Not to my knowledge.