Author Topic: Bike security when touring in the USA  (Read 4234 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Pat Lamb

Re: Bike security when touring in the USA
« Reply #15 on: July 20, 2010, 11:32:17 am »
I carried a 6' cable and combination lock across our TransAm.  I think we used it once, when we locked the bikes up in Glacier and toured the park on shuttle buses.

The rest of the time the bikes were always in sight if either of us was the least bit uncomfortable.  It got to the point we could look at each other and one of us would say, "I'll go in here, you stay with the bikes, what do you want?"

Cafe, restaurant, gas station, find a seat where you can watch the bike.  And panniers.  Take your wallet and cell phone in with you.

Offline NoGaBiker

Re: Bike security when touring in the USA
« Reply #16 on: July 23, 2010, 01:44:41 pm »

Many people might think bikes are stolen by stealth, and many are in fact stolen that way, but there is also the grab-and-run method by which the thief knows where you are inside, and even if you may be seated and watching, he will guage how far down the road he can get before you are outside and trying to stop him. Sure, you might see him take your bike, but he is 100 feet away and accelerating by the time you are off your duff and over to the curb. Call immediately and the police might arrive in forty-five minutes. Meantime, Scudgemo has himself a $1500.00 bike in the trunk of his car and he is careening through the outskirts of town. The lesson here is this. Even if you can see your bike from your place in the restaurant, keep it locked and keep your most valuable possessions with you.


One way to combat this specific problem: As you coast to a stop in front of the restaurant, store, etc. shift all the way to the smallest cog on back. Then shift as far back up towards the big cog as you can, BUT DON'T PEDAL. Leave the bike like that. Snap your helmet strap through the rear wheel. If somebody jumps on the bike and tries to snatch it, the helmet will slow them (has to be unsnapped and removed for them to pedal); and when they try to pedal they'll get that awful grinding that comes when you try to shift way up from a very low speed. Might serve to scare them off the bike, but if not it will definitely slow them down.

Offline tonythomson

Re: Bike security when touring in the USA
« Reply #17 on: July 23, 2010, 04:03:59 pm »

Many people might think bikes are stolen by stealth, and many are in fact stolen that way, but there is also the grab-and-run method by which the thief knows where you are inside, and even if you may be seated and watching, he will guage how far down the road he can get before you are outside and trying to stop him. Sure, you might see him take your bike, but he is 100 feet away and accelerating by the time you are off your duff and over to the curb. Call immediately and the police might arrive in forty-five minutes. Meantime, Scudgemo has himself a $1500.00 bike in the trunk of his car and he is careening through the outskirts of town. The lesson here is this. Even if you can see your bike from your place in the restaurant, keep it locked and keep your most valuable possessions with you.

Like this as I often leave the bike unlocked in a gas station or cafe, but at some point you invariably take your eyes of the bike - going to the bathroom - paying the check etc.
One way to combat this specific problem: As you coast to a stop in front of the restaurant, store, etc. shift all the way to the smallest cog on back. Then shift as far back up towards the big cog as you can, BUT DON'T PEDAL. Leave the bike like that. Snap your helmet strap through the rear wheel. If somebody jumps on the bike and tries to snatch it, the helmet will slow them (has to be unsnapped and removed for them to pedal); and when they try to pedal they'll get that awful grinding that comes when you try to shift way up from a very low speed. Might serve to scare them off the bike, but if not it will definitely slow them down.
Just starting to record my trips  www.tonystravels.com