Author Topic: Camp Stove - Fuel  (Read 3253 times)

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Offline peterswim

Camp Stove - Fuel
« on: June 19, 2010, 08:28:23 pm »
In late July, I'm flying to Buffalo from LA to do the last leg of the Northern Tier.  I have a Snow Peak Gigacamp stove that uses white gas, but I'm assuming I can't fly with the fuel.  I've also been told to make sure the stove is clean, i.e. no fuel scent.  Does anyone have any experience with this and does anyone have a suggestion where to buy white gas in Buffalo?

Offline Bikearound

Re: Camp Stove - Fuel
« Reply #1 on: June 20, 2010, 09:07:54 am »
As far as where to buy fuel in Buffalo, I can't be of much help. If your stove runs on white gas only and thats all that has ever been in the stove, just pour out the contents and let it sit with the cap open and any remaining fuel should evaporate and you should have no issues on your flight. Even if it does smell a little bit, that shouldn't be a problem. I have flown with my stove in my luggage and as long as it is empty, they don't seem to care what it smells like.

Offline JayH

Re: Camp Stove - Fuel
« Reply #2 on: June 20, 2010, 03:57:36 pm »
You can use coleman's fuel which you can generally find in Walmart and target. Obviously if you can find a good outdoors store, you can buy like MSR "white gas" but Coleman's Fuel is essentially the same thing.  Now, finding less than a gallon might be a challenge! 

Jay

Offline bktourer1

Re: Camp Stove - Fuel
« Reply #3 on: June 20, 2010, 05:06:53 pm »
Coleman has gas in plastic red bottles in the 1 quart size.  So does MSR but they use cans.

If the stove is empty and doesn's smell  us the " they didn't ask & I won't tell".
If you tell the airline they probably wont take a chance and  wont let you fly

Offline rvklassen

Re: Camp Stove - Fuel
« Reply #4 on: June 21, 2010, 10:28:38 am »
Coleman has gas in plastic red bottles in the 1 quart size.  So does MSR but they use cans.

If the stove is empty and doesn's smell  us the " they didn't ask & I won't tell".
If you tell the airline they probably wont take a chance and  wont let you fly
Your likelihood of success with a stove on an airplane is largely a function of which airport you use.  Phoenix is very strict.  We lost a Coleman peak II there.  They have a large number of folks doing the Grand Canyon.  So they know to ask.

Just up Transit from the airport there's an RV supply place.  You would think they'd have it. 

If you're going to do the leg that goes up the Canadian side of the Niagara river (very scenic, but do pack a passport), you can easily go to the KMart on Walden (I think it's in the Galleria Mall).

Offline indyfabz

Re: Camp Stove - Fuel
« Reply #5 on: June 21, 2010, 11:27:34 am »
Your likelihood of success with a stove on an airplane is largely a function of which airport you use.  Phoenix is very strict.  We lost a Coleman peak II there.  They have a large number of folks doing the Grand Canyon.  So they know to ask.[/quote]

That's what I was told by a TSA employee in Kalispell when I asked about flying with stoves.  Basically, "If we catch you we take it."  It's not the smell.  It's the fuel and burn residue.  Stupid, I know, since the thing is harmless, but for this reason I will not fly with my dragonfly.

Two options:

1.  If you are shipping your bike FedEx, UPS, etc., pack the stove and empty fuel bottle with the bike.  That's what I did last year for a trip.
2.  Ship the stove abd bottle to yourself in Buffalo.  Some (all?) FedEx locations will hold packages for pickup.  If you use general delivery mail, make sure the Buffalo post office it goes to is accessible.

Offline MrBent

Re: Camp Stove - Fuel
« Reply #6 on: July 03, 2010, 02:32:17 pm »
Freakin' moronic TSA/airline rules.  Yeah, my EMPTY stove is gonna bring down the plane.  Doesn't ANYONE use critical thinking skills anymore?  Moronic jerks.

Consider a Pepsi can/alcohol stove.  Fuel can be found anywhere.

Cheers,

Scott

Offline Westinghouse

Re: Camp Stove - Fuel
« Reply #7 on: July 03, 2010, 02:36:19 pm »
One problem is it comes in one and two gallon cans. You might get quart plastic jugs of it in Wal Mart.

Offline Tourista829

Re: Camp Stove - Fuel
« Reply #8 on: July 03, 2010, 03:29:06 pm »
Walmart, Target or Sports Authority. Purchase extra sealed containers for the extra white gas. Pack the empty stove in you checked luggage. Curb check it. I have to believe, there are a number of ACO members, living in Western New York, that would give you a quart of white gas. Put a request in the classified ads. You have nothing to lose. LOL

Offline DaveB

Re: Camp Stove - Fuel
« Reply #9 on: July 04, 2010, 07:44:17 pm »
Most "white gas" stoves will also burn unleaded automobile gasoline and, of course, the supply is available at any gas station.  Buy a 1-gt (actually 1L) Sigg or similar metal fuel bottle and refill it as needed.  You might even get what you need free if you catch someone filling their car and ask for a small amount for your bottle.

Offline Tourista829

Re: Camp Stove - Fuel
« Reply #10 on: July 05, 2010, 12:45:14 am »
My stove, Coleman Peak does both, but you need to change out something and I have often heard that unleaded gas, stinks when used in this application. Is this true? If not it would be a possible solution.

Offline sanuk

Re: Camp Stove - Fuel
« Reply #11 on: July 10, 2010, 07:15:08 am »
I'm planning on using an old MSR multi fuel stove this summer cycling the West Coast.  Last time I used it was hiking in the Himalaya where I could just get a top-up with either gasoline or diesel in any petrol station or from anyone selling it from a bottle by the side of the road, adulterated or otherwise.  Same here is SE Asia.  Guess that might not be the case in the US of A.  Can't remember what I did years ago when I used it hiking in Canada.  Must have got it at a gas station.

maha22

  • Guest
Re: Camp Stove - Fuel
« Reply #12 on: July 17, 2010, 08:19:55 am »
I don't recommend it at all unless the manufacturer of the stove supplies a conversion package.

Main reason being that the appliance was manufactured and CERTIFIED to operate on that particular fuel. If you do some "McGyvering" and alter the appliance to operate on a different fuel, two things will happen. The manufacturer will take no responsibility if this appliance hurts anyone or damages property because you have "altered" the appliance. Also insurance companies will deny any claims for the very same reason.

Unless you can get a factory conversion with a new rating plate that shows this appliance is certified for use with that fuel...Don't do it! It's not worth the risk or liabilty.

As for consumption, it all depends on the btu's of the appliance. One pound of propane contains a little over 20,000 btu's. That means if you have a 20,000 btu burner you will burn 1 pound in 1 hour. So if you have a 12,000 btu stove you will get a little less than two hours of coooking time from a 1Lb bottle. That is at full heat. If you turn the burner down at all, it will extend that time a bit. Look at the rating plate on the appliance and you will see the btu's of the burner listed there.
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« Last Edit: July 17, 2010, 01:34:51 pm by FredHiltz »