Author Topic: Which pedal?  (Read 6763 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline sanuk

Re: Which pedal?
« Reply #30 on: August 03, 2010, 02:27:48 pm »
Well, I should have known someone would say "you should have known."  Thanks for reminding me.  So, as an ignoramus who has bought SPD pedals imagining they were the more or less only sensible/readily available option for touring, I'd like to know what exactly are the options for someone not interested in applying for the Tour de France.  However, right now I don't feel like investing any more money.  I'm riding mainly on the flat side of the SPD (what does that stand for?) pedals, especially in traffic and definitely on anything resembling a steep hill.  On a straight level surface I can use the cleats (I wish we could simplify the vocabulary and settle on 'cleats' which is what they in fact are rather than 'clipless' which refers to something else) as they do improve cycling efficiency.  I have them set at max looseness and still they're non too easy to get out of in a hurry especially as that only seems possible with the foot at the bottom of the stroke.  I may be fit enough to restart my ride at the end of this week.  In the interim I may be seen practising on some of Seattle's bike routes as they're called although only two I've ridden so far - Seward Park and the Burke-Gilman trail - are motorized traffic free.  I could write reams on what this says about social/political and economic attitudes/planning in the US vs. Europe.  In fact, to my surprise I even think I feel somewhat safer on the measly beat-up manic roads of SE Asia and find the gung ho Tour de France wannabe cyclists of America often as threatening as any other form of traffic here.  But that's another issue.  Read 'Letter from Moscow' in the latest edition of the New Yorker for a really scary traffic future.  Thanks to the well-wishers.  There're still a lot of good people out there. 

Online jsieber

Re: Which pedal?
« Reply #31 on: August 03, 2010, 02:45:26 pm »
I'm riding mainly on the flat side of the SPD (what does that stand for?) pedals, especially in traffic and definitely on anything resembling a steep hill. 
I believe SPD stands for, "Shimano Pedaling Dynamics". After some more use I think that your pedals will start to release a little bit easier after some initial wear on the cleat itself. I at least find that new cleats are often a little more difficult to get out of when first installed. Pedals are clearly one of those items that people have personal feelings towards. There are lots of brands and models to choose from, but over the years I have been very happy with the Shimano SPD pedals that I have used.

Offline ducnut

Re: Which pedal?
« Reply #32 on: August 03, 2010, 04:56:32 pm »
"sanuk" is correct on SPD.

Clipless comes from the fact that the pedal system does not use a toe clip.

Riding on the SPD's for a while will wear down the sharp edges of the cleats and allow them a bit more freedom of dis-/engagement. However, they'll always be harsh operating. That's just the nature of the design. The Crank Brothers products work more smoothly, as do Speedplay and Look (both more serious than you want).

I run platforms on my MTB and Speedplay on everything else. Just an FYI.

Offline biker_james

Re: Which pedal?
« Reply #33 on: August 06, 2010, 03:17:17 pm »
I think that you will run into the same problem with every type of clipless pedal out there-if you forget to unclip, you are attached to the bike.
Someone above said that "no one" likes SPd-actuallt you'd probably find millions that do. Just different options.

Offline staehpj1

Re: Which pedal?
« Reply #34 on: August 06, 2010, 06:42:17 pm »
I think that you will run into the same problem with every type of clipless pedal out there-if you forget to unclip, you are attached to the bike.
Someone above said that "no one" likes SPd-actuallt you'd probably find millions that do. Just different options.
+1  I like my SPDs just fine.  Most of the tourists I have met on the road use SPDs and the ones who don't mostly either used toe clips, power grips, or no retention system.

My recommendation is to either work at getting used to your SPDs or if you don't think they are for you just go with a platform pedal.

Good luck with whatever you choose.

Offline biased bohemian

Re: Which pedal?
« Reply #35 on: August 08, 2010, 01:08:39 pm »
I ride Shimano SPD 520 on my touring bike and have had 1 wipe out and a near crash with a parked car. As others have said it comes down to gaining experience.  Climbing a steep hill fully loaded and then coming to a stop at the apex is the most difficult scenario, due to exhaustion, the incline with the bike load pulling back due to gravity, and the difficulty of getting started pedaling again.  After the first accident i learned that there are some steep hills (those with stop signs or lights at the top) where its safest to unclip and even walk the bike the final few feet.  In all cases i have learned to unclip at least one foot when approaching a stop sign or light.

I have platforms on my hybrid and much prefer the freedom.  For city and recreational riding SPD are probably not worth the hassle.  For touring I wouldn't go without, given the added power and stability.  I went with SPD with the added platform that the 520 comes with, instead of other cleat types, because the accompanying shoe could be worn indoors without the cleat scratching the floor.  This is another important consideration if touring.
___________________________________
www.biasedbohemian.com - an unabashedly biased look at the world from one small unapologetic man