Author Topic: Pannier Secuity  (Read 3306 times)

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Offline mu2flyer

Pannier Secuity
« on: September 26, 2010, 10:54:27 am »
Now that I have my LHT all set up with Ortlieb bags all around I’m afraid to take them anywhere. If stopping at a store or anywhere that the bike will be out of my site I’m concerned the bags will walk away. The bags are worth more than the content. I’m using the bike mainly for commute and building miles for a future tour and as a consequence I make many stops. I have a big cable lock for the bike but Ortlieb only offers a wimpy cable for security to keep the honest people honest. I don't mind carrying a bag or two into an establishhment but more than that is awkward. I would like to know how others handle this security issue.

Offline justbarb

Re: Pannier Secuity
« Reply #1 on: September 26, 2010, 05:23:06 pm »
I'd use the shoulder straps that came with the panniers.  I know the wimpy locks aren't that much of a deterent, but at least most people don't walk around with wire cutters.  Do you live a place that is prone to theft?  I have never had a problem leaving my panniers unattended for awhile.  I take my handle bar bag with me, as that has all the most important items in it.

CyclesafeSr

  • Guest
Re: Pannier Secuity
« Reply #2 on: September 26, 2010, 08:16:34 pm »
Nobody but a fellow tourer will know how much your panniers cost.  If you want to reduce appeal, cover them up with garbage bags.


Offline mu2flyer

Re: Pannier Secuity
« Reply #3 on: September 26, 2010, 09:28:54 pm »
I live in the San Francisco bay area and it’s only a matter of time before it’s stolen. My wife and I have had our bikes stolen twice. Once we had them parked and locked outside a grocery store in Palm Springs and after a few minutes they were gone. The other time they were on the back of our motor home in San Jose, CA parked in the street in front of our friends home strapped but not locked and they were taken while we were sleeping inside. I hate to be so paranoid but I can’t ignore the fact that some people out there want your stuff. Locking my bike is a first priority but these bags come on and off so easily that it makes for a quick get-a-way. Looking at the attachment mechanism of the Ortlieb plus pannier it has an arm that swings around to secure against a part of the rack, when slipped in place it secures the bottom of the pannier. If a second one of those arms could be slipped into the slider and adjusted to secure against the rack on the opposite side of the pannier it would take the thief awhile to get it figured out. Of course the downside is, you would have to loosen the arm and slide it out of the way each time you want to remove it. Not a big deal.....  it could be a deterrent.....  :-\

Offline Tourista829

Re: Pannier Secuity
« Reply #4 on: September 26, 2010, 09:51:00 pm »
We have Ortliebs and other than taking in our handlebar bags, we leave the bags on the bike. I might not leave it on my bike, in a bad neighbor or for a long period of time. (We have tents, sleeping bags, and pad on top the the rear bags.) I find it hilarious that Ortlieb provides a lock for their handlebar bag. They won't get the bag, but could steel everything in the bag. At first I was nervous, but after many miles not so much anymore, so far so good.

Offline John Nelson

Re: Pannier Secuity
« Reply #5 on: September 26, 2010, 10:31:14 pm »
(1) Nothing you can do can stop the determined professional thief.
(2) Almost anything you do will stop the opportunistic thief.

I just run my bike cable through the frame and the handles on all four panniers and around a pole. It's not good enough for overnight in New York City, but it's good enough for my trip inside the grocery store in Tillamook, Oregon.

Offline paddleboy17

Re: Pannier Secuity
« Reply #6 on: September 27, 2010, 01:08:55 pm »
On tour, my traveling companion and I usually take turns watching the bike when we go into stores or position the bikes where we could watch them.  We do chaing them up at night to discourage the casual thief.

For commuting, maybe you should take a lower profile.  I would not use Otliebs on a commute due to their cost.  Blackburn used to make some small bags that were great for commuting.  If you need to worry about your stuff getting stolen on your commute, maybe you need to rethink your route.

I suppose you could investigage making your panniers revolting.  Spattering with mud, maybe fabricating something that looks really disgusting.  Just a thought.
Danno

Offline mu2flyer

Re: Pannier Secuity
« Reply #7 on: September 27, 2010, 09:21:02 pm »
All good ideas,   THANK YOU..... I must admit I did consider making everything look revolting, but after all the brain damage I can’t bring myself to disfigure this equipment..... I’ll just apply some common sense. 8)

Offline DwarvenChef

Re: Pannier Secuity
« Reply #8 on: September 29, 2010, 04:17:50 pm »
When I lived in the San Jose area I had a Specialized bike stollen off my 3rd floor balcony. Then next one wa stolen within 24 hours of purchase off the main street of Santana Row where my wife worked.

Any quality locking system will deter a mojority of these guys, but if they want it... it's gone... Nowdays I go with the theory of junky stuff doesn't grab attention, so I try to get the shiny new look off the item as soon as posable, lessen the ability to resell it fast.
Slow is smooth, smooth is fast.

Offline Westinghouse

Re: Pannier Secuity
« Reply #9 on: September 30, 2010, 04:29:38 pm »
The sad truth is you cannot leave anything nice out in the open to the general public for long. Soon or late Scudgemo comes and takes it. Carry your panniers with you.

Offline sanuk

Re: Pannier Secuity
« Reply #10 on: October 06, 2010, 10:18:17 pm »
On my recent ride on the west coast if I was stopping at a supermarket I asked if I could bring the bike inside.  Usually, they said OK and I parked it right in front of the cashiers.  After all I was a paying customer.  The main theft problems are always in the bigger cities/urban areas. 

Offline Tourista829

Re: Pannier Secuity
« Reply #11 on: October 07, 2010, 09:29:57 pm »
I thought of something, Axa, from the Netherlands, offers a rear wheel lock, that attaches to the rear frame stays and allows you to lock the rear wheel, so someone can't ride the bike. (Good for quick stops) With 60 pounds of gear, on your 30 pound bike, I can't see someone carrying the bike away. (of course they can remove all the bags and gear but.....) It also has the ability to attach a loop cable, to the lock, and you can wrap it around a poll. http://www.cantitoeroad.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=103 Cost Lock $50, Optional Chain $40

Offline Westinghouse

Re: Pannier Secuity
« Reply #12 on: October 08, 2010, 03:48:04 pm »
I was once in Hanoi, Vietnam where I met a young woman from Germany who had cycled to there from Germany with one forced train or bus ride in some region where it was considered very improper and unallowable for a woman to ride a bike. She had panniers that actually locked to the racks. I don't believe it was a homemade arrangement. It looked like the panniers and racks went together. I do not know the name of the manufacturer. With so much bicycle touring in western Europe you might find a wider choice of panniers there.

Offline litespeed

Re: Pannier Secuity
« Reply #13 on: October 09, 2010, 10:41:21 am »
Ortlieb panniers are easily detachable but only someone familiar with them would know how to do it - yank on the carrying handle. The vast majority of the population would be hard put to get them off especially if you put the handles under the hold-down straps as I always do. This also keeps the handles away from the spokes and being abraded.

I have never had any problem with thievery but I would probably come up with extra security if I were to bicycle tour in Latinamerica or the far east. I have spent a lot of time there and know about the persistent petty thievery.

Offline indyfabz

Re: Pannier Secuity
« Reply #14 on: October 14, 2010, 12:43:24 pm »
I was once in Hanoi, Vietnam where I met a young woman from Germany who had cycled to there from Germany with one forced train or bus ride in some region where it was considered very improper and unallowable for a woman to ride a bike. She had panniers that actually locked to the racks. I don't believe it was a homemade arrangement. It looked like the panniers and racks went together. I do not know the name of the manufacturer. With so much bicycle touring in western Europe you might find a wider choice of panniers there.

Did they look like these?:

http://robertbeckmandesigns.com/rackframes.html

I have a set of his racks and panniers.  They ain't coming off without the correct size hex wrench.