Author Topic: Newbie question re: tire size  (Read 1673 times)

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Offline cherieandbob

Newbie question re: tire size
« on: November 07, 2010, 01:58:46 pm »
Will a 26 inch tire fit a 700c wheel?  I am finding conflicting information.
Thanks in advance for your help,
Cherie

Offline Fred Hiltz

Re: Newbie question re: tire size
« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2010, 03:32:28 pm »
No way. Whoever says yes about this is not to be trusted on anything else <grin>. All you ever want know and more about tire sizing is at http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html. To complete your education and become an expert, see http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tires.html.

Fred

Offline whittierider

Re: Newbie question re: tire size
« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2010, 12:21:04 am »
The more common misconception is that 27" and 700c fit each other, which is also not true at all.  700c is enough smaller that no amount of determination, tool, lube, or anything else will get it on a 27" rim, at least not without plenty of damage to one or the other or both; and a 27" tire will be way too loose on a 700c rim.  No workie.

Offline cherieandbob

Re: Newbie question re: tire size
« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2010, 05:58:39 am »
Thank you both for clarifying this issue for me.  I appreciate it!

Offline Moondoggy

Re: Newbie question re: tire size
« Reply #4 on: November 21, 2010, 03:24:39 am »
Maybe they where talking about tubes. I've seen people use a 26 inch tubes on a 29er mt bike rim

Offline rvklassen

Re: Newbie question re: tire size
« Reply #5 on: November 21, 2010, 03:35:44 pm »
27" tubes are fine on a 700c or 29er.  I wouldn't use a 26" tube on one though.  Might be able to make it stretch but it would be easier to just use a tube closer to the right size.   Although I'd sooner a 26" tube on a 700c or 27" rim than the other way around.  Easier to stretch it a bit than jam the excess in without folding it.


Online DaveB

Re: Newbie question re: tire size
« Reply #6 on: November 21, 2010, 03:46:17 pm »
Bicycle rim and tire sizes are enormously varied and complex since they came from a variety of national and manufacturer's backgrounds with little thought of interchangability.  Several years ago an organization, the European Tire and Rim Technical Organization (ETRTO) was formed to develop standards so any ETRTO specified rim would match with a tire having the same specs.  Their standards were later adopted by the International Standards Organization so you will see them also referred to as ISO standards.

Sheldon Brown wrote an article explaining these standards and giving a table of current and former sizes.  It's very instructive reading: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tire_sizing.html