Author Topic: Biking Shorts/Pants  (Read 5257 times)

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Offline DaveB

Re: Biking Shorts/Pants
« Reply #15 on: December 18, 2010, 03:57:30 pm »
... I agree that almost no one else is going to worry about how you look or pay any attention to you.  They are too busy worrying what others think about them.  

As noted several times above, there are many shorts available that have a lycra liner to make riding comfortable and a loose fitting outer short that won't offend the viewing public.  
« Last Edit: December 23, 2010, 07:38:06 am by FredHiltz »

Offline Pat Lamb

Re: Biking Shorts/Pants
« Reply #16 on: December 18, 2010, 04:08:10 pm »
News flash: no one really cares.
If you're that shy, carry a pair of swimming trunks and slip 'em on before you face the public.

To heck with the civilians. Your road grime, sunscreen, and sweat stains will bother them much more than your silly biking shorts.

Not to mention odor.  A couple of times I was self-conscious because we hadn't had showers or laundromats for a few days.  While I tried not to get too close to "civilians," nobody seemed to care.

Offline Eaton

Re: Biking Shorts/Pants
« Reply #17 on: December 18, 2010, 09:05:24 pm »
I have a couple pair of Canari MTB shorts but don't wear them because they don't hang right on me.  If I don't wear regular cycling bib shorts, I wear Dickies 15" inseam shorts.

Offline soilsguy

Re: Biking Shorts/Pants
« Reply #18 on: December 19, 2010, 09:50:40 pm »
I have found that Cabelas have nylon lightwt shorts that are easily slipped on over the lycra shorts when needing to go in for a bite to eat or into the grocery store where the issue of modesty faces you.  I do agree with the folks that have commented on getting out of the lycra riding shorts (I ride bibs) and using coolmax skiivies under a set of light weight hiking shorts to go in for supper if that is what we are all into for the days-end.

Offline staehpj1

Re: Biking Shorts/Pants
« Reply #19 on: December 20, 2010, 06:53:21 am »
... I agree that almost no one else is going to worry about how you look or pay any attention to you.  They are too busy worrying what others think about them.
I agree at least for the US.  In some countries Lycra may be a bigger problem.   I always found that, in the US at least, I was generally received warmly just about everywhere and never found my bike shorts to be a problem when interacting with the local folks.  That said if the OP is self conscious he can certainly either wear baggier shorts or slip something on over them.

Oh and off topic a bit, but I have found that wearing sunglasses while speaking with folks is way more alienating than wearing lycra.  Definitely take those shades off when speaking to folks.  It makes a world of difference.  A warm smile, good eye contact, and an open attitude will be far more helpful than your choice of shorts.
« Last Edit: December 23, 2010, 07:39:11 am by FredHiltz »

Offline waynemyer

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Re: Biking Shorts/Pants
« Reply #20 on: December 20, 2010, 09:49:34 am »
staehpj1 and bogiesan have both hit the nails on the head.  Your modesty is one thing and yours entirely.  People really don't care.  I have walked into plenty of high-end restaurants and somewhat formal events (granted, in VT and Portland OR) wearing my cycling gear.  Sometimes dripping wet.  Nobody cares; if anything, arriving in gear has led to conversation and networking.
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Offline staehpj1

Re: Biking Shorts/Pants
« Reply #21 on: December 20, 2010, 10:24:17 am »
if anything, arriving in gear has led to conversation and networking.

Since you mentioned that I will add that I enjoy talking about my tour and like the fact that others immediately recognize me as a cyclist.  Being in clothes instantly recognizable as bike clothes has often led to pleasant conversation and many times to offers of hospitality.  It might start with "did we see you 60 miles down the road this morning?" and then wind up with "I fixed way too much pot roast can you help us eat it?", and finally "can we put you up for the night" or "do you want to camp in our yard?".  Those encounters allowed me to meet some wonderful people.

That said some folks don't want to be recognized as a cyclist and asked a lot of questions.

Offline popeyespal

Re: Biking Shorts/Pants
« Reply #22 on: December 20, 2010, 11:02:13 am »
... it appears that there are some very workable alternatives that involve shorts/knickers that come with a padded liner. I have ordered a pair each of Rivendells and Enduras to test them out. Most seem to be designed with the courier/mountain biker in mind.

I would also like to point out that if it is profitable for a good number of companies to offer alternatives to riding in just lycra shorts than there must a decent size part of the cycling community who DO NOT think like you do. Who DO NOT let the general public experience more of you than a TSA agent.

To Staehpj1.....your point about being more recognizable as a  touring cyclist is a good one. But I believe that riding a bike loaded with panniers would serve the same purpose.
« Last Edit: December 23, 2010, 07:40:18 am by FredHiltz »

Offline John Nelson

Re: Biking Shorts/Pants
« Reply #23 on: December 20, 2010, 12:02:18 pm »
Threads wander. You cannot stop it and it's not necessarily bad. Just go with the flow. Once you get to page 2 of a thread, most people don't even remember what the original question was. Use what you can and ignore the rest. No one person owns a thread.

Offline popeyespal

Re: Biking Shorts/Pants
« Reply #24 on: December 20, 2010, 01:51:15 pm »
Thanks for the good advice John... I really should relax more and just ignore the flies....
« Last Edit: December 23, 2010, 07:42:28 am by FredHiltz »

Offline roadrunner

Re: Biking Shorts/Pants
« Reply #25 on: December 20, 2010, 08:29:21 pm »
For utility (pockets), comfort, and my own preference for not wearing lycra on tours, I've settled on wearing biking briefs under nylon zip-off pants.  In warm weather, I ride without the "legs," when it's cool I zip on the legs.  At the end of a day's ride, I change from the biking briefs to regular skivies and wash out the briefs.

This combination reduces the amount of clothes needed.  One pair of zip-offs, a pair of regular nylon shorts, and two pair each of biking briefs and regular skivies is all I need, as far as pants go.  Nylon shorts can also be used as a swimsuit.

Offline DaveB

Re: Biking Shorts/Pants
« Reply #26 on: December 21, 2010, 03:03:03 pm »
Thanks for the good advice John... I really should relax more and just ignore the flies....
You got a lot of direct answers to your posting but your basic premise for it was also questioned. There is no problem with that.  

It's just like someone posted asking what new bike they should buy and was asked "what's the matter with your current one"?  It's a valid response.
« Last Edit: December 23, 2010, 07:44:21 am by FredHiltz »

Offline litespeed

Re: Biking Shorts/Pants
« Reply #27 on: December 22, 2010, 07:18:36 pm »
I've never worn "just lycra" - always MTB shorts. The ones I wear now are the best I've had. They are FOX MTB shorts with separate (and very comfortable) lycra shorties and baggy overshorts. They have well designed pockets that nothing falls out of.  I can wash either quick-drying part when necessary. Unlike most athletic wear lycra bicycling tights are usually worn in public. I compare it to wearing a football or baseball uniform in public and personally refuse to do so. Also I just don't like the look of them. For a shirt I wear a long sleeve Under Armour jersey
« Last Edit: December 22, 2010, 07:25:46 pm by litespeed »

Offline Fred Hiltz

Re: Biking Shorts/Pants
« Reply #28 on: December 23, 2010, 07:45:20 am »
This thread drifted out of the realm of civility some time ago. Our forum is here to discuss bicycles, gear, cycling, and even how to interact with the "civilians." Comments on other members' posting style, intent, or motivation for writing are out of bounds.

I have removed the posts that we deemed to violate our forum Rules and Etiquette, and a few phrases in otherwise useful contributions. New posts will receive the same scrutiny. In short, please mind your manners.

I am tempted to sign this, "Mother."

Fred

Offline staehpj1

Re: Biking Shorts/Pants
« Reply #29 on: December 23, 2010, 09:05:07 am »
First, Thanks for the clean up Fred.  I wanted to post again but things were heated enough that I didn't want to risk inflaming them further.  I will do that (post that, is hopefully not inflame) now that things are cleaned up a bit.

To Staehpj1.....your point about being more recognizable as a  touring cyclist is a good one. But I believe that riding a bike loaded with panniers would serve the same purpose.

I was actually referring to when off the bike in a store, diner, pizza joint or whatever.

I know that one of the nicest hosts we had was a couple who only recognized us because we were in bike clothes.  We were camped in a nearby small town park and walked to the town pizza joint.  This super nice couple invited us to drop in on them for dinner the next day when we would be in their town.

When we got there they had the grill already fired up and a couple chickens roasting.  We had wine and cheese and great conversation before dinner, then a delicious meal.  They had offered to let us camp in their orchard, but when we got there they put us up in a really nice little house they run as a B&B or rental unit.

In the morning they fed us again and sent us on our way with a lot of local knowledge.  We wanted to go whitewater rafting and as it turns out he had worked for some of the local rafting companies and sent us to the best one.

We would have missed all of that if we hand not been easily recognizable as cyclists.

BTW, meeting folks like this couple is also the reason why I prefer to camp in the open in town parks, church yards, or what ever (with permission when necessary) rather than "stealth" camp.  We still manage to camp for free a good percentage of the time and it almost never requires stealth.
« Last Edit: December 23, 2010, 09:06:48 am by staehpj1 »