Author Topic: St George to Flagstaff  (Read 2591 times)

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Offline adv911

St George to Flagstaff
« on: February 26, 2011, 03:00:50 pm »
Hello,
I am looking to tour either direction on a route from St George, Utah to Flagstaff, AZ. I have searched the forum but can only find bits and pieces of info. I want to do the route in the shoulder seasons and hike across the ditch (canyon). I see that the winds tend to come from the South so should I travel Northbound? Is there an elevation component I should consider instead of wind? What about traffic and shoulders?

I would not mind doing a lot of the route on gravel as I will be on a lightly loaded cross bike in the ultralight style, and can plan accordingly, but the tentative route does not include gravel as I have not found info on that.

The route would be St George, Highways 9, 59, 389, 89, 67, cross the canyon, then 64/180 to Flagstaff (or reverse)



Thanks, for any info in advance!

Greg

« Last Edit: February 26, 2011, 03:05:51 pm by adv911 »

Offline aggie

Re: St George to Flagstaff
« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2011, 04:14:59 pm »
Don't even try to ride your bike on any trails in the canyon.  It is expressly forbidden.  I'm not even sure about walking it on the Bright Angel Trail.  Better check with the park first or you could end up without a ride.

Offline jamawani

Re: St George to Flagstaff
« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2011, 04:41:32 pm »
I have crossed the canyon many times - but in involves hiking the North Kaibab and either the South Kaibab or Bright Angel as well as shuttling your bicycle on the shuttle service.

First - the North Rim doesn't open until mid-May.
Second - the shuttle service usually doesn't start until after Memorial Day.
Third - the shuttle service does not normally offer this service.
You need to know precisely what you are doing and make special arrangements.
Fourth - you must get a backcountry permit to camp in the canyon.
(These are very hard to get on short notice.)
Fifth - Or you can stay at the Phantom Ranch bunkhouse.
(This is almost impossible to get on short notice.)

If you take a bicycle on the canyon trails - not only are you crazy,
but you will be arrested, fined, and your bicycle will be impounded.

Considering that you do not seem to know the particulars of hiking/biking in the Grand Canyon -
I suggest that you enjoy biking from rim to rim via Lee's Ferry.
US 89 between Lee's Ferry and Cameron can be busy with narrow shoulders.
Caution is advised.

http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/page/?o=RrzKj&page_id=26347&v=QK

Offline adv911

Re: St George to Flagstaff
« Reply #3 on: February 26, 2011, 05:42:22 pm »
Guys,
I never asked for advice on riding or hiking the Grand Canyon. I have hiked the Grand Canyon on more remote routes than the bright angel. I never even suggested that I would ride my bike on any trails- why are you jumping to these conclusions?

If you must know, my bike has couplers and I will break it down and backpack it across on a one day rim to rim (no advice needed on R2R in a day please).

My question was meant to deal specifically with roads and road conditions whether gravel or  asphalt.

Sorry, I don't mean to come across as rude or anything on my first post here but I really don't now how the leap was made that I would be riding on trails in the park. And I really don't know where this came from- "Considering that you do not seem to know the particulars of hiking/biking in the Grand Canyon"

Is that the kind of holier than though comments I can expect? If so I may need to cancel my membership.
Thanks,
Greg

Offline jamawani

Re: St George to Flagstaff
« Reply #4 on: February 26, 2011, 06:25:27 pm »
Dear Holier - -

A friend was a ranger in the inner canyon -
She quit.  She got tired of evacuating people out who didn't know what they were doing.
And, yes, some of these people didn't make it.

So EXCUUUUUUSE me for posting -
Since you didn't even bother to post the particulars of your experience.
Perhaps you might learn to do so initially in the future.

Offline adv911

Re: St George to Flagstaff
« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2011, 10:03:55 pm »
My question specifically asked about roads in the area and stated that I would "hike" across the canyon. So for you to jump to conclusions and suggest that I don't know enough to go there and maybe should stay home in bed is rather rude and bad form on your part. I would expect a little more courtesy from a fellow biker.

I see from your website that you are a very experienced biker and I respect that. I read your post on the canyon before I posted. Please don't assume that because you are so experienced that others are clueless and should stick to routes you consider safe.

Now, I apologize for any mis-understandings that I may have created, but can we get back to the original question as I would appreciate information on the route.

Thanks,
Greg


 

Offline Fred Hiltz

Re: St George to Flagstaff
« Reply #6 on: February 26, 2011, 11:09:13 pm »
Gentlemen, you have both misread the other's posts, an easy mistake to make. Let's put that away and get back to the topic. I will remove any further remarks about manners, posting style, language, and the like. Sorry to be a nanny, but we are here to discuss cycling. Please PM me if you have any question about this.

Fred

Offline adv911

Re: St George to Flagstaff
« Reply #7 on: March 01, 2011, 06:09:03 pm »
Still looking for info., especially the portion on the South side of the canyon to Flagstaff. I have never been on the South rim. Anyone?

Greg

Offline roadrunner

Re: St George to Flagstaff
« Reply #8 on: March 02, 2011, 10:55:53 pm »
Adv 911 -- I did a tour from Salt Lake City to Flagstaff (including a spur detour to Zion National Park) that included much of the area you're planning to cover.  Unless you've already ridden in Zion, I'd recommend taking Utah-9 through Zion, rather than Utah-389 (which I have not ridden).  The auto-free riding in Zion Canyon is spectacular, offset somewhat by the stiff climb at the east end of the park and the need to hitch a ride to get a bike through the tunnel.  (Getting a ride was no problem.)  I rode Alternate US-89 to Jacob Lake, which is a long climb, but not as difficult as I anticipated.  Then I took Alt 89 to US-89 to Cameron to the South Rim (another long, hot climb).

After a half day on the South Rim, I rode AZ-64 to I-10 to Flagstaff.  I chose AZ-64 over US-180 to avoid the heavier traffic and climbing on 180.  I don't know if that was a better choice, since 64 is a steady climb on a rather bland road to I-10.  I camped at a marginal Jellystone Park campground in Valle.  I rode the I-10 shoulder to Flagstaff (legal in Arizona).  Later I rode a much more interesting route -- old Route 66 which is present between I-10 Exit 167 (2 miles east of the AZ-64/I-10 interchange) and Flagstaff.  Whatever route you choose will be great.  Take sufficient water and sunscreen.

Offline adv911

Re: St George to Flagstaff
« Reply #9 on: March 26, 2011, 07:16:05 pm »
Thanks Road Runner,

Any idea of distances between service stations/ water sources between the South Rim and Wolliams? I am assuming you mean I-40 not I-10? The Route 66 leg looks good. I looked up info on a few websites. That sounds like a winner.

Greg

Offline roadrunner

Re: St George to Flagstaff
« Reply #10 on: March 27, 2011, 10:19:27 pm »
Greg,

As I recall, the only services between the South Rim and I-40 are at Tusayan (just outside the park boundrary) and Valle, which, at 30 miles from the South Rim, is about half way to I-40.  So, essentially, there are two 30-mile stretches with no services.  From the AZ-64/I-40 interchange, it's only a mile or so into Williams, so that's not a significant detour for services.  There is a little general store/cafe at Parks (about the only thing there), about half way from Williams to Flagstaff on old Route 66 which makes for an interesting stop.  Sorry aobut the I-10/I-40 mixup; I live in southern Arizona not too far from I-10, so that's the interstate I usually deal with.

John

Offline Tourista829

Re: St George to Flagstaff
« Reply #11 on: March 27, 2011, 10:51:43 pm »
Adv911, I spent some time riding in St. George, Utah. I unfortunately do not know the whole route but the part I rode was on asphalt, traffic wasn't bad, parts had shoulders, and the terrain was very hilly in spots. Sorry I couldn't give you more info. The part I rode was well worth it.

Offline adv911

Re: St George to Flagstaff
« Reply #12 on: March 28, 2011, 11:29:17 am »
John,

Thanks for the info on the services. That's a nice distance between stops for water. I knew what you meant on the freeway.

Tourista,

Thanks fo rthe encouragement. I love that part of the world. It's like night and day between home (Seattle area) with the dry, wide open spaces.

Greg

Offline litespeed

Re: St George to Flagstaff
« Reply #13 on: April 10, 2011, 08:40:17 am »
"If you must know, my bike has couplers and I will break it down and backpack it across on a one day rim to rim (no advice needed on R2R in a day please)."

Travelling ultralight and packing your bike across the Grand Canyon in one day? I am mightily impressed. I'm sure it's doable for someone in good shape (and with plenty of perseverance). I have hiked R2R in the Grand Canyon in one day but only because I ran out of water. I'd love to hear the details of your trip if you post them anywhere. Good luck.

Offline adv911

Re: St George to Flagstaff
« Reply #14 on: April 16, 2011, 06:42:30 pm »
Litespeed,

I am in the planning stages and I will certainly post a trip report. I am shooting for the a Fall trip. You are right, it's ambitious but based on past experience.

I hiked the Canyon on the Thunder river trail/ Tapeats/ Deer Valley, which is a tough trail. We left early coming out and it took about 5 hours to get out on the North Rim, which is higher than the South rim. I am thinking that an early start, coupled with a nice break in the middle of the day, and then finishing going up the South rim will make it doable. The trails are better and there is less elevation gain. Even if I finish well into the night with a headlamp- it's all good. (We started under headlamp on the previous trip to beat the heat).

My base UL backpacking weight was about about 13 lbs with 3 days food not counting water. So, take away two days food, add water for the crossing, about 22lbs for my bike and i will be somewhere around 40 lbs. Not light, but not bad. Earlier I was 38 lbs with water- I carried a lot, which ended up to be way too much (too much food too). This is inline with what I carried up Rainier.

The biggest thing I still have to work out is the best way to carry my bike across. There is a back pack setup available but it's a little heavy and does not break down into bike friendly size. (It's a little long)

I was inspired by some of the stories about the epic trips on bikepacking.net. I have been thinking about bike/ packraft trips as well.

Greg