Author Topic: Dream Bike Starting with a Long Haul Trucker Frame  (Read 6347 times)

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Offline jack

Dream Bike Starting with a Long Haul Trucker Frame
« on: April 21, 2011, 11:33:50 am »
I want to build a deluxe touring bike. 
Starting with a LHT frame I'm looking for component input.

wheel set
crank
brakes
rubber
etc...etc...

Don't spare the detail

Jack

Offline tonythomson

Re: Dream Bike Starting with a Long Haul Trucker Frame
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2011, 10:56:54 pm »
This is exactly what I did, talk to the  owner of a shop you trust and get the best for the job you want to do.. Try MTB gearing as it will get you  real low gearing for hills.
Buy the best rims and spokes you can afford, I like Mavic. Tyres = endless discussion on here but they are all good - the ones discussed that is.

Get good quality racks - again check out the discussions.

At the risk of being boring 'cos I always bang on about it GET a mirror and be safe.

Some things you can save money on but tyres, wheels n racks I wouldn't.
Hope this has been some help if not specific.  Just don't ask about saddles (I've got a box full)
Good luck
Tony
ww.tonystravels.com
Just starting to record my trips  www.tonystravels.com

Offline DaveB

Re: Dream Bike Starting with a Long Haul Trucker Frame
« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2011, 11:20:08 am »
I want to build a deluxe touring bike. 
Starting with a LHT frame I'm looking for component input.

wheel set
crank
brakes
rubber
etc...etc...

Don't spare the detail

Jack
Instead of starting with a bare frame/fork, consider buying the bike complete.  Surly provides suitable parts and low gearing so you will have an appropriatly equipped bike right off and it will be a lot less exensive than buying all of the components individually.  Even if you upgrade a few things later, the overall cost will likely be lower.

There is no more expensive way to build a bike than to buy the frame and then buy each component  individually.  If cost is no object and you know exactly what you want, fine, but prepare for a very significant cost penalty.   

Offline pptouring

Re: Dream Bike Starting with a Long Haul Trucker Frame
« Reply #3 on: May 03, 2011, 05:39:48 am »

Instead of starting with a bare frame/fork, consider buying the bike complete. 


the Long Haul Trucker Deluxe only comes as Frame/Fork.

Offline DaveB

Re: Dream Bike Starting with a Long Haul Trucker Frame
« Reply #4 on: May 05, 2011, 11:06:27 am »
the Long Haul Trucker Deluxe only comes as Frame/Fork.
OK, that's the first time I've seen it listed on Surly's web site.  So, yto minimize the financial damage, have your dealer order a "complete build kit" with the frame.  It will be somewhat less expensive than buying everything ala carte.   Since Surly is QBP's housebrand, getting the build kit through QBP should be easy. 

Offline Pat Lamb

Re: Dream Bike Starting with a Long Haul Trucker Frame
« Reply #5 on: May 05, 2011, 04:30:52 pm »
I read the OP's request a how to build a deluxe bike (quality, not model), starting with a standard LHT frame.  Unless you need to travel frequently, I'd pass on the couplers.  Under that circumstance, the recommendation to start with a standard build makes a lot of sense.  Change the saddle and pedals if you like, then swap out as the limitations of equipment become obvious (or stuff wears out). 

<philosophy> There's a real risk of becoming an armchair tourist, not willing to get out and ride because you're afraid something's not perfect.  Unfortunately, everything is imperfect, and no two people can agree on what "best" is at a given point in time.  It's better to go with "good enough" than not to go at all. </philosophy>

Offline Mark Manley

Re: Dream Bike Starting with a Long Haul Trucker Frame
« Reply #6 on: June 07, 2011, 05:15:20 pm »
As you haven't set a budget I would spend a large pile of your money on a Rohloff 14 speed hub gear, I have one on a Roberts Rough Stuff and they are worth it.

Offline Trek950

Re: Dream Bike Starting with a Long Haul Trucker Frame
« Reply #7 on: June 08, 2011, 10:57:55 pm »
+1 for Rohloff  if cash is in plentiful supply.    some good info in the brochure here  http://www.thorncycles.co.uk/ravennomad.html

I think the LHT complete is a great deal though.  S&S is a waste for most people IMHO. 

Offline DaveB

Re: Dream Bike Starting with a Long Haul Trucker Frame
« Reply #8 on: June 17, 2011, 09:19:11 am »
  S&S is a waste for most people IMHO. 
S&S couplers downside is cost and a very slight weight penalty.  Also, disassembly, packing and reassembly of the bike  requires a moderate level of mechanical ability and is not for those who need a bike shop for every minor adjustment.   

They are great if you travel a LOT with your bike and fly and/or use other public transportation.  The packed S&S case will fit into a cab, bus, train luggage rack or small rental car where a full size travel case won't and it flies as a standard piece of luggage ($) instead of oversize ($$$).   Their cost will repay itself if you travel enough.   The very occasional bike traveler cannot justify them. 




Offline happyriding

Re: Dream Bike Starting with a Long Haul Trucker Frame
« Reply #9 on: June 26, 2011, 03:23:52 pm »
For that price, I would buy a Rivendell Sam Hillborne instead.  Here are some pictures:

http://www.ecovelo.info/2010/06/27/long-term-road-test-rivendell-sam-hillborne/

For sizes 60 and above, get a double top version.  

edit: Oh, yeah...

wheelset
rear rim: Velocity Dyad with 36 or 40 holes depending on your weight.
rear hub: Phil Wood, White Industries, VeloOrange Grand Cru touring hub, or Shimano XT
See White Industries rear hubs here: http://www.whiteind.com/rearhubs.html
See VeloOrange rear hub here: http://store.velo-orange.com/index.php/components/wheelsets-rims-hubs/hubs/grand-cru-4-bearing-hub-135mm-spacing.html
See Phil Wood rear hub here: http://www.wheelbuilder.com/store/phil-wood-fsa-fsc-rear-touring-hub.html

front rim: Velocity Dyad with 32 or 36 holes depending on your weight.
front hub: SON28 dynamo hub (stunningly beautiful!)
See front hubs here(click on pictures to enlarge them): http://www.rivbike.com/products/show/700c-wheels/18-102

front light (runs off dynamo hub)
Silver polished Schmidt Edelux or black Lumotec IQ Cyo
For dynamo hub details, see http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/Schmidt.asp
Edelux headlight: http://www.flickr.com/photos/27988383@N06/4150996421/
IQ Cyo headlight: http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/b&m-hl.asp
Beam comparison tests: http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/headlights.asp

rear light (also runs off dynamo hub)
Busch & Müller Seculite Plus: http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/taillights.asp

front rack (for handlebar bag and to attach light to)
Nitto mini front rack: http://www.rivbike.com/products/show/mini-front-nitto/20-020

handlebar bag (to sit on front rack)
Acorn Boxy Rando Bag: http://www.acornbags.com/boxybag.html

fenders
VeloOrange Hammered Fenders (or Honjos if you can afford them)
http://store.velo-orange.com/index.php/accessories/fenders.html

crank
VeloOrange Gran Cru Fluted Triple(48-34-24): http://store.velo-orange.com/index.php/components/cranksets/grand-cru-110-fluted-triple-crankset-24x34x48t.html
Sugino XD2 (46-36-24): http://www.rivbike.com/products/show/sugino-xd2/12-190

pedals
Shimano PD-A530: Clip on one side, platform on the other side.  If you break a cleat, or you want to ride from your campground to the store with sandals on, you can switch to the platform side.
http://www.rei.com/product/764688/shimano-a530-spd-sport-road-pedals

cassette
Shimano 11(12?)-34, or Shimano 12-36

brakes
VeloOrange Gran Cru Cantilevers, Shimano Short Reach Cantilevers(highly polished and beautiful) , Gran Cru Long Reach Sidepulls, or DiaComp Center Pulls
http://store.velo-orange.com/index.php/components/brakes/calipers.html
http://www.jensonusa.com/store/product/BL408B00-Shimano+Br-R550.aspx

seatpost
Nitto S-83: Highly polished. Absolutely beautiful.
http://www.rivbike.com/products/show/nitto-s-83-seatpost/11-078

handlebars
Nitto Noodle: http://www.rivbike.com/products/show/nitto-noodle-bar/16-113

bar tape
Leather bar tape: http://handlebra.com/gallery
If you ask, Ray will set you up with pieces long enough to wrap 48cm Nitto Noodles.

stem
Nitto Technomic Deluxe: http://www.rivbike.com/products/show/nitto-technomic-deluxe/16-044

saddle
Whatever you can tolerate.  If you find one you actually think is comfortable after 70 miles, buy a lifetime supply.

rubber
Schwalbe tires up to 38-40mm as your fork will allow.
http://www.schwalbetires.com/bike_tires/road_tires

If you have to go smaller, Jack Brown (blue's) 33mm: http://www.rivbike.com/products/show/jack-brown-green-blue/10-092

racks
Silver: Tubus Nova and Tubus Cosmo
http://www.ortliebusa.com/cartgenie/prodList.asp?scat=16

Black: Tubus Tara and Tubus Cargo
http://www.ortliebusa.com/cartgenie/prodList.asp?scat=15

panniers
Ortlieb BikePacker Plus: http://www.ortliebusa.com/cartgenie/prodList.asp?scat=6
Carradice Super C: http://www.wallbike.com/carradice/panniers/carradice-super-c-rear-pannier
« Last Edit: June 28, 2011, 12:57:39 am by happyriding »

Offline Tourista829

Re: Dream Bike Starting with a Long Haul Trucker Frame
« Reply #10 on: June 26, 2011, 03:46:24 pm »
R+E Cycles
Since 1973
5627 University Way NE
Seattle, WA 98105
Sales - 206.527.4822
Service - 206.527.0360
Fax - 206.527.8931
e-mail - Sales@rodcycle.com

Custom Fit, better tubing, and components. Go with 26" wheels and S&S Couplers and their airline legal travel case. Pass on the Rohloff unless you have another $1300. I would only use it on an expedition bike. 

Offline litespeed

Re: Dream Bike Starting with a Long Haul Trucker Frame
« Reply #11 on: June 26, 2011, 06:53:10 pm »
For what it's worth, here's the touring bike I built for myself: I bought a stock Litespeed Blue Ridge with Ultegra Triple components, Avid Shorty cantilever brakes, Cane Creek stem, bar end shifters (the one custom touch) and Mavic Open wheels. Over the years I have changed or added the following: Deore XT at the crank, Shimano SPD pedals, custom made wheels (Rhyno Lite Sun Rims, 36 spoke with Ultegra hubs - lets me use bigger tires), Bruce Gordon racks (low riders in front), Ortleib panniers and handlebar pack, SKS fenders, Terry Liberator Y gel saddle. I carry my sleeping bag, tent and sleeping pad in a small duffle bag crossways on my rear rack. I use 35mm Schwalbe Marathon Supreme tires.
« Last Edit: June 26, 2011, 10:36:59 pm by litespeed »

Offline Tourista829

Re: Dream Bike Starting with a Long Haul Trucker Frame
« Reply #12 on: June 26, 2011, 07:55:50 pm »
Litespeed, nice bike! I have to say I have not had the opportunity to ride a titanium frame on a long tour, how is it for comfort? The geometry looks good and there is plenty of chainstay clearance for bags at 45cm. Components are top notch, If I may ask, how much did you spend by the time you put the bike together?

Offline litespeed

Re: Dream Bike Starting with a Long Haul Trucker Frame
« Reply #13 on: June 26, 2011, 10:35:18 pm »
Replacement cost for my bike fully loaded (including all gear)for touring is about $4500 - 5000. It's the most expensive thing I own that isn't real estate. I saved up for three years to buy the initial bike in 2000. It's a lifetime investment. The stock Blue Ridge sold for $3400 last time I checked. It's plenty comfortable but I've always considered bicycle comfort to depend mainly on the tires and saddle. The main advantage of titanium is its indestructible nature and fatigue strength.
« Last Edit: June 26, 2011, 10:38:04 pm by litespeed »

Offline whittierider

Re: Dream Bike Starting with a Long Haul Trucker Frame
« Reply #14 on: June 26, 2011, 11:25:45 pm »
Quote
The main advantage of titanium is its indestructible nature and fatigue strength.
Umm... See this fatigue test on frames.  Ti did better than steel for fatigue life, but not as well and aluminum and carbon.