Author Topic: Nightly Accomodations & Bicycle Traffic  (Read 2190 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline bikeguy54

Nightly Accomodations & Bicycle Traffic
« on: June 13, 2011, 07:47:44 am »
I'm planning a solo west to east Trans-Am ride, and wondering about nightly accommodations.

I plan on camping most of the time, but would enjoy the occasional motel.
Would really enjoy a nightly shower, but I don't I expect that to happen.
I don't want to stealth camp if I can avoid it.
I will be using the ACA maps.

For those of you that have done that ride, what should I expect for nightly accommodations, and did you know in the morning where you'd be staying in the evening.

Also, how often will I see other riders. I'll be starting the last week of July.

Thanks,

Mike

Offline JimF

Re: Nightly Accomodations & Bicycle Traffic
« Reply #1 on: June 13, 2011, 08:40:04 am »
Mike:
You'll see on the ACA maps many possible overnights (churches, town parks, etc.) where showers plus are available. One of the advantages of ACA. In areas lacking such ACA spots,  I found it useful to stop at local libraries ahead of where I would be overnighting to see if a church or other had a contact I could call to see if I could camp. Often, they'd open the building for me. We always left a thank you note and small donation in appreciation. Have a great tour.

Offline Rep

Re: Nightly Accomodations & Bicycle Traffic
« Reply #2 on: June 13, 2011, 09:30:22 am »
In small towns stop and greet the local police.  Ask their advice.  For showers stop at a campground or fitness center and ask if you can, "buy" a shower.
Bicycling, Brewing & Backgammon...What a life.

Offline indyfabz

Re: Nightly Accomodations & Bicycle Traffic
« Reply #3 on: June 13, 2011, 10:00:58 am »
Private campgrounds will have showers.  U.S.F.S. campground will proabbly not.  I stayed in one BLM campground on the Nothern Tier that actually had showers.  Some state parks will.  Some city parks will.  (Bring shower shoes like flip flops and some might be s little grungy.)  Sometimes you can shower at the city pool or, as noted, buy a shower from a gym, etc.

The AC maps idicate whether a campground is private, U.S.F.S., etc.  You will probably encounter more indoor lodging that you think you will.  If you are leaving in a little more than a month, why not buy the maps now so you can get an idea of what's available?

I did the section from Missoula to Fairplay, CO starting the 3rd week in June and mid-July.  I encountered at least a dozen people that I can remember, mostly going to W-E, but a few going E-W.  You seem to be starting later so maybe you will have more E-W riders.

Offline johnsondasw

Re: Nightly Accomodations & Bicycle Traffic
« Reply #4 on: June 13, 2011, 11:19:40 am »
More often than not while touring, I've found it necessary to "shower" in a local stream, river, lake, of cold water faucet at a campground.  It works, but fortunately I enjoy cold water.  Bring biodegradable soap and a small pan to pour water over self.  Anything to avoid trying to sleep all sweaty and sticky. I have a small chamois like towel that dries fast and is very light.
May the wind be at your back!

Offline Pat Lamb

Re: Nightly Accomodations & Bicycle Traffic
« Reply #5 on: June 13, 2011, 03:10:56 pm »
As for knowing where to spend the night, it varies by where you are.  There are some stretches, particularly in the west, where there's only one reasonable choice for a day's travel.  Further east, it was often mid-day, or even later, that we could project where we'd spend the night.  Plan a little, but be ready to roll with the punches.

Offline staehpj1

Re: Nightly Accomodations & Bicycle Traffic
« Reply #6 on: June 13, 2011, 05:19:47 pm »
As for knowing where to spend the night, it varies by where you are.  There are some stretches, particularly in the west, where there's only one reasonable choice for a day's travel.  Further east, it was often mid-day, or even later, that we could project where we'd spend the night.  Plan a little, but be ready to roll with the punches.
Yeah, I agree with that.

On the TA the ACA, does a very good job of documenting potential places to stay.

We often had a pretty good idea of where we would be staying when we started the day, but not always.  That said we remained flexible and improvised as needed sometimes.  There were also places where you really needed to plan a couple days ahead due to the spacing of towns.

I will add that you should also talk to folks going the other way on the route and share stories.  We often got good advice about places to stay and things to do from the cyclists we met.

Offline Fooesboy

Re: Nightly Accomodations & Bicycle Traffic
« Reply #7 on: June 14, 2011, 05:00:25 am »
Hi Mike,

My wife and I are planning to do part of the TA, from Florence to Yellowstone.  We are riding up the coast from Cresent city and expect to be leaving Florence around the 27th of July.

We are planning on doing as much camping as possible so we might bump into you along the way....... (we will be the ones pushing the bikes up every little hill....... after all it is called a PUSHbike right?)  ???

Chris

Offline bikeflu

Re: Nightly Accomodations & Bicycle Traffic
« Reply #8 on: June 14, 2011, 06:37:42 pm »
All good advice so far. Also, a lot will depend on what kind of mileage you are able/willing to do in a day. I did the TA last year, and would always have a loose plan for the next 2-4 days in my head, and for every day, I would have 3 destinations in mind: Wimpy Day, Decent Day, and Awesome Day. Additionally, unless there was a compelling reason to stay in a certain place, I'd prefer to do a 100 mile day with a warm shower at the end rather than call it quits after 60 miles and do without. Sometimes weather, or various other factors my shorten your days, though.

All of that being said, you'd be surprised how clean you can get with just a sink or water spigot and some camp soap. I stayed remarkably fresh for nearly week in western Kansas/eastern Colorado with nothing but sink showers.

Offline CharlieR

Re: Nightly Accomodations & Bicycle Traffic
« Reply #9 on: June 20, 2011, 07:09:50 am »
Daily showers: if you are taking a dromedary bag you already have a shower. I get in to my site and if there is no shower I fill the bag and let it sit in the sun for a couple of hours. Hang it up and using the 'drinking' opening let the water start flowing. As long as you don't waste time you can let it just run and get completely clean.

Not a lot of sunlight - sit it on some asphalt or a rock.
Have a loose pair of nylon shorts to wear while showering so you don't get the 'indecent exposure' charge.
Tight on water - carry a small pack of baby wipes. Also real good to have after having to do any maintenance on the chain/drive train.

Offline Bike Hermit

Re: Nightly Accomodations & Bicycle Traffic
« Reply #10 on: June 21, 2011, 01:10:52 pm »
Sign up at warmshowers dot org.  Most Rv parks will have tent sites and can be pretty cheap ($7-$10) with laundry and showers. Some even have coin op showers you can use whether or not you stay there. And people will talk to you when you are traveling by bike. So be open and ask where to stay. You might be surprised. A lot of times people will offer a place to stay without even asking.

Offline happyriding

Re: Nightly Accomodations & Bicycle Traffic
« Reply #11 on: June 21, 2011, 11:32:14 pm »
Daily showers: if you are taking a dromedary bag you already have a shower. I get in to my site and if there is no shower I fill the bag and let it sit in the sun for a couple of hours. Hang it up and using the 'drinking' opening let the water start flowing. As long as you don't waste time you can let it just run and get completely clean.

Not a lot of sunlight - sit it on some asphalt or a rock.
Have a loose pair of nylon shorts to wear while showering so you don't get the 'indecent exposure' charge.
Tight on water - carry a small pack of baby wipes. Also real good to have after having to do any maintenance on the chain/drive train.
Yep. For times when no shower was available, I carried a folding pocket shower:

http://www.rei.com/product/758045/sea-to-summit-pocket-shower

and a bathing suit. You can fill it up 1/4 of the way, hang it on a tree branch, and it provides a nice long shower.  I just took cold showers.

I carried 5-6 surgical gloves which are great for working on tires/chains, and I also carried baby wipes which are good for cleaning up afterwards or for the few occasions when my water was too precious to shower with.