Author Topic: Map Case = No Confidence??  (Read 1636 times)

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Offline SilasTarr

Map Case = No Confidence??
« on: July 10, 2011, 01:36:32 am »
I've read that one of the best ways to protect yourself as a bicycle tourist from potential theft/attacks is to always project a confident appearance.  Know what you're doing, where you're going, and avoid looking uncertain or lost (even if you are!).  Of course, projecting a confident and friendly personality will also gain you the respect of drivers, townspeople, and pretty much anyone you'll meet!  I'm already pretty good at this, even though I've only just begun training for my first tour and actually have little confidence in my abilities or experience with my gear, but I can already see the results from the way others react when I ride by!

All that to say that I know projecting an appearance of confidence is a valuable tool for any bicycle tourist.  With that in mind, I present the following question for discussion:

Do map cases (such as the Ortlieb Map Case) that keep your maps in plain sight contribute to an appearance as a lost, non-confident tourist?


I'm interested in getting some kind of map case to go on top of my handlebar bag and hold some ACA maps and stuff, but I might rather just stop and look at my maps every so often if having my maps predominately displayed at all times makes me look like I don't know what I'm doing.  What do y'all think?

Offline rlc5925

Re: Map Case = No Confidence??
« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2011, 08:50:13 am »
No, imho

Offline litespeed

Re: Map Case = No Confidence??
« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2011, 09:04:23 am »
I use the Ortlieb map holder on top of my handlebar bag. I've never been attacked or even threatened. I've never been robbed or even had anyone attempt to rob me. I've never met anyone in all my bicycle touring travels in the U.S. and Canada who has been attacked or robbed. However if I were going to some country where petty thievery is common (India, Central America, etc.) I would find a way to secure my panniers and gear.
« Last Edit: July 10, 2011, 07:23:06 pm by litespeed »

Offline tonythomson

Re: Map Case = No Confidence??
« Reply #3 on: July 10, 2011, 05:50:41 pm »
Get a map case & fit on your bar bag or you will look even more of a beginner searching through your pack for a map. I've travelled the world and never had any probs due to looking at my map.  In fact it is often the opposite as locals will often ask if you need help and great opening for a chat. 

I agree if you end up in some combat zone in a big city you need to keep moving and look confident but it's kinda hard to blend in dressed in cycling gear riding a packed bike.  I try to  avoid major towns/cities or take the main route starting early to ensure I get through - but that's because I'm more concerned about traffic.

Have fun and enjoy
Just starting to record my trips  www.tonystravels.com

Offline John Nelson

Re: Map Case = No Confidence??
« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2011, 07:44:15 pm »
In a safe area, there's no harm and even certain advantages in looking vulnerable. In a dangerous area, it might be better to look confident, but I don't think simply having a map case will be detrimental to that. Furthermore, there are far, far, fewer dangerous areas than most people think.

Offline whittierider

Re: Map Case = No Confidence??
« Reply #5 on: July 10, 2011, 07:58:33 pm »

Quote
Do map cases (such as the Ortlieb Map Case) that keep your maps in plain sight contribute to an appearance as a lost, non-confident tourist?

I never thought about it, but my initial reaction is that having the maps in a clear map case made for the purpose should give the appearance that you're ready and organized and know what you're doing.

Offline Grumpybear

Re: Map Case = No Confidence??
« Reply #6 on: July 10, 2011, 10:33:48 pm »
Just because you have never been where you are going, does not mean you aren't capable of getting there.

Offline happyriding

Re: Map Case = No Confidence??
« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2011, 04:27:35 am »
I've read that one of the best ways to protect yourself as a bicycle tourist from potential theft/attacks is to always project a confident appearance.  
Really?  What kind of new age armchair psychology is that?  It could be true.  Have any studies been done?  Or do you put your faith in any lunatic that has an internet connection?  If someone says something is true, is it?  Or, do you believe in evidence?

In my experience, pulling my map out of my map case and looking around in a confused manner almost immediately brought offers of help, and directions that got me where I needed to go.  But maybe you'll get gunned down instead.  Good luck. :)



« Last Edit: July 11, 2011, 04:34:34 am by happyriding »

Offline paddleboy17

Re: Map Case = No Confidence??
« Reply #8 on: July 11, 2011, 12:34:50 pm »
Is this from a 3rd world or a rural US perspective.

I can only speak from riding in US and Canada.  Pretty much a touring bike is pretty good conversation starter.  People want to know who you are and what you are doing and where you are going. 

I guess it might be different in "bandit country".
Danno

Offline indyfabz

Re: Map Case = No Confidence??
« Reply #9 on: July 11, 2011, 01:40:15 pm »
In my experience, pulling my map out of my map case and looking around in a confused manner almost immediately brought offers of help, and directions that got me where I needed to go.[/quote]

+1.  I have a hard time understanding the fear mentality that seems to be behind many posts these days.  On Saturday I got back from nine days of riding in southwest Montana with my 5' tall girlfriend.  (Kept my map strapped under the bungee cords that held sleeping bag to my front rack.)  We rode on several stretches of relatively remote dirt roads, including one 20 mile stretch where we saw vastly more cattle than vehicles.  Not once did I worry about Cletus jumping out of his pickup and forcing me to squel like a pig.  And when people would ask us where we were headed I didn't feel the need to lie for fear that they would be laying in wait around the first hairpin turn in the road.