Author Topic: Tents  (Read 4225 times)

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Offline TomMignon

Tents
« on: October 06, 2011, 12:54:03 am »
I'm Curious as to what type of tents are the most popular?  I sell Tents and would like to know what you look for in a tent.

Thank you for your help.

Joe B

  • Guest
Re: Tents
« Reply #1 on: October 06, 2011, 07:50:14 am »
From my observations of fellow riders;
2-3 person size
freestanding is preferred
ability to pitch fly and foot print separately
ability to attach tent body after fly is pitched is awesome in bad weather
2 doors
2 vestibules



Offline staehpj1

Re: Tents
« Reply #2 on: October 06, 2011, 08:21:24 am »
I may not be typical, but I find that rated capacities are fine and I prefer a one person tent when solo and a two person one when traveling with someone.  Freestanding is a plus, but weight trumps that for me.  While nice vestibules and multiple doors are not a big enough plus to be worth much extra weight.

For me something along the lines of the Eureka Spitfire 1 is about as good as it gets.  The reasons are low price, low weight, and good functionality.  To be perfect it would be free standing as well but I don't see how it could be and still have all of the other good qualities it has.  Being freestanding is nice for those times when it is used on a concrete surface like under a picnic pavilion roof.  In the absence of being freestanding, the ability to stand with two stakes or anchor points is a reasonable compromise.

I think I prefer the side door, but it is harder to keep the inside dry when entering and exiting in the rain as compared to a tent with an end door and an overhanging fly.


Offline Tandem4Rider

Re: Tents
« Reply #3 on: October 06, 2011, 08:22:11 am »
Honestly, it must simply do the job it is designed to do.  I can give up the second door and third person if it means saving significant weight.  The freestanding is a must.  I've really come to appreciate and like the gear loft.

Offline TomMignon

Re: Tents
« Reply #4 on: October 06, 2011, 09:54:26 am »
When you say light, how light are you talking?  1 person 2 lbs?  2 person 3 lbs?

Thank you,

Offline staehpj1

Re: Tents
« Reply #5 on: October 06, 2011, 11:22:14 am »
When you say light, how light are you talking?  1 person 2 lbs?  2 person 3 lbs?
That would be great, but...
For me tents that light have either been more expensive than I was happy with on in some way less functional.  I have settled for 1 person about 2.25 pounds and 2 person slightly over 4 pounds.

Offline paddleboy17

Re: Tents
« Reply #6 on: October 06, 2011, 12:05:20 pm »
I checked out your site.  Nice selection Big Agnes stuff, but the site is a little slow--maybe high traffic from this forumn?

I don't thing bike tourist are quite as draconian about weight as back packers.  Free standing is good, easy to put up is good, and good behavior in high winds and storms is also important.  I think bike touring gear needs to be able to take a good wack, so I am suspicious on ultralite gear.  Stuff is expensive, and I don't want to toss something because it failed the third time I used it. 

I have a Big Agnes Seed House 1.  It is an OK tent.  My only real complaint is that the fly does not overhang the door enough.  I would like to be able to come and go when it rains, and watching water puddle in the front of my tent when I unzip the fly is a real downer.  I have broad shoulders, and do not fit in an MSR Hubba, an otherwise popular tent, so I like the roominess of the Seed House.  I have dealt with lots of hot summer nights, so side ventilation is important.  I have over time worked out a way to rig the fly on my tent so I can some side ventilation.

The Big Agnes Lynx Pass 1 looks interesting.  Maybe it was not on the market when I bought my tent in 2008.
Danno

Offline Mattie

Re: Tents
« Reply #7 on: October 08, 2011, 02:44:42 pm »
I'm Curious as to what type of tents are the most popular?  I sell Tents and would like to know what you look for in a tent.

Thank you for your help.


Size - good single tent
Color - no bright orange/yellows but prefer green/brown
Weight - 2.5 kg but certainly not much more
Space - a bit of inside porch area for storage at night
Ventilation - for hot weather and improved handling of condensation
Simple to erect and dismantle - I do not want to be there all day messing with dozens of pegs, guy lines and poles. Freestanding is a bonus.
Up to the job - it must be able to keep you dry for a night of heavy wind and rain.

Examples - Failure - Terra Nova Laser Comp - because it has no useful ventilation so is baking hot in summer evenings and condensation at all other times.

Success - MSR Hubba in green - although it has yet to be tested in poor weather.

I hope this helps.


Offline driftlessregion

Re: Tents
« Reply #8 on: October 08, 2011, 11:12:32 pm »
For traveling solo, a freestanding 2 person with a good sized vestibule, full rain fly, need to be able to sit up and long enough for me at 6'3". One door is sufficient for one person. I assume that all name brand tents will be fairly easy to set up, withstand wind and rain.

Offline bogiesan

Re: Tents
« Reply #9 on: October 09, 2011, 09:16:53 am »
I'm Curious as to what type of tents are the most popular?  I sell Tents and would like to know what you look for in a tent.
Thank you for your help.

I think your market research would be easier and the information much more valuable if you simply looked at the inventories of other bicycle touring companies. simply searching this forum will reveal there are no fewer than 20 different tents from 8 manufacturers recommended or favored among the regular participants. That's impossible for a small business to maintain or even to provide drop shipment service for that many different mfrs. Among those 20 tents there are no clear favorites nor are there any particular common traits except the satisfaction of the users.
Lightweight? No necessarily.
Free standing or stake out? Both.
Large or small? Yes.
Big vestibule? On some.
Single wall or fly? Both but favoring double walls; gets tricky when one considers weight or staked out.
Bompproof? Not really, too heavy and most of us don't tour in winter.
Net/mesh or nylon walls? Yes to both.
Mfr? North Face, Kelty, REI, big Agnes, Sierra Designs, Mountain Hardware, Coleman, Eureka, Moss, MSR, and some imports and obscure house brands and the range further includes tarps and bivvys.

The last two tents I purchased were fifteen years apart and based only on price and opportunity. I didn't need either new tent but both times I happened to be in a store where the tents were on deep-deep-deep discount. Each was readily adaptable to bicycle travel (I only do supported tours, I'm all done carrying my own stuff) but bike touring was never the primary consideration in either decision: price. 
I play go. I use Macintosh. Of course I ride a recumbent

Offline BikeFreak

Re: Tents
« Reply #10 on: October 29, 2011, 01:30:04 am »
My main worries are:

Condensation.

The rest is secondary.

Lucas

Offline jcostanz

Re: Tents
« Reply #11 on: November 17, 2011, 12:50:04 pm »
A big negative on a tent for me is one that the poles are in sleeves most of the way.  These are easy to assemble but can be a real pain to remove in the morning.
Free standing is a plus for on a pad, extremely hard ground and very soft ground.  Also for packed group tours when your neighbor trips over your guy lines in the night:(

Offline indyfabz

Re: Tents
« Reply #12 on: November 22, 2011, 02:03:19 pm »
A big negative on a tent for me is one that the poles are in sleeves most of the way.  These are easy to assemble but can be a real pain to remove in the morning.

+1.  They can be a real pain in the YKW when the sleeves get wet. The poles can adhere to the sleeves causing the sections to come apart when you try to extract the poles. I had a North Face tent that was particularly offensive in that regard.

Offline bogiesan

Re: Tents
« Reply #13 on: November 23, 2011, 08:10:46 am »
Interesting observation. Probably location-specific because I do not recall ever having that problem with sleeved tents over the years. But what really fascinates me about this point is how ubiquitous the clip style of tent has become.
Sleeves are necessary structural elements in 4-season tents designed specifically for high winds and snow loading.
I play go. I use Macintosh. Of course I ride a recumbent

Offline litespeed

Re: Tents
« Reply #14 on: November 24, 2011, 11:47:56 am »
I have a Hilleberg Akto. It is extremely weatherproof - really stands up to rain, wind and even water running under the tent. It is also very light with a roomy encloseable patio. The double wall means condensation is not a problem. The single crossways pole is fully sleeved but easy to install and remove. The disadvantages are that it is not free standing - uses an incredible 12 stakes - and the entrance is a bit awkward. It also is single piece - does not have a removeable rain fly - although the numerous vents are sufficient for all but the hottest nights. It has held up well but if it ever wears out I will probably go back to North Face which is, among other things, a lot cheaper. Or Eureka with their huge selection and moderate prices.
« Last Edit: December 04, 2011, 06:24:10 pm by litespeed »