Author Topic: Building up a LHT frame  (Read 2118 times)

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Offline Ron Scott

Building up a LHT frame
« on: October 25, 2011, 08:34:59 pm »
If money were no object and if you hated spending stupid money, how would you build-up a LHT frame for...long touring?

I guess what I'm really reacting to is the stock groupset, forgetting the saddle and pedals. But I'm just an old roadie and mountain biker at heart looking to expand into rides spanning weeks or months.


Ron

Offline Fred Hiltz

Re: Building up a LHT frame
« Reply #1 on: October 25, 2011, 11:01:16 pm »
Have you looked at the relevant posts already here, Ron? Go back to the Gear Talk list of topics and type building LHT into the search box. Or just building, if you think that opinions based on other frames might be worthwhile.

Fred

Joe B

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Re: Building up a LHT frame
« Reply #2 on: October 26, 2011, 10:15:03 am »
Hi Ron,
Great timing for this post/question. I am currently in the middle of assembling just a bike. I too started with the idea that the budget is unlimited as long as the parts can justify the cost (no gold plating the carbon fiber please). I started with a 2011 Surly LHT also and accumulated the parts over the past 3 months, I began assembly last week and hope to finish before this weekends club rides.

I have started a blog to document the build and my return to long distance touring. Right now the only thing there is a parts list for the complete build including the prices.

joesride.blogspot.com

I am going to post pictures of the build process , possibly this afternoon if I have time.

Hope this helps.....

Joe B

Offline waynemyer

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Re: Building up a LHT frame
« Reply #3 on: October 26, 2011, 03:24:20 pm »
If you're going to town on durability, I would throw in Nokon cabling. I just broke 16,000 miles last night on my initial install. A month ago, the rear shifting was getting balky and I thought it was due to be replaced, but the derailleur just needed some cleaning.

If you want cartridge bearing ease and durability, but would like to save a few dollars, I would suggest considering Veo-Orange's Grand Cru hubs, headsets, and bottom brackets. I have and use all of the aforementioned. While I haven't yet broken the 1000 mile mark with any of these components*, the construction and finish are impressive. VO does some pretty rigorous field testing before putting a design into retail production.



*except for one headset, but really, it's just a headset.
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Offline Ron Scott

Re: Building up a LHT frame
« Reply #4 on: October 26, 2011, 08:24:21 pm »
Great ideas guys, thanks.

Joe, looks like your about $3K plus racks and bags for a ride that's quite the Caddy; doesn't look like you're skimping but I don't see stupid money in there either. Gotta see the pics man.

16,000 on one set of cables; what a story.

Question: Do we really need cantilevered brakes...?

Joe B

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Re: Building up a LHT frame
« Reply #5 on: October 27, 2011, 11:12:18 am »
Question: Do we really need cantilevered brakes...?

My gut feeling is that the new disk brake systems are better all around (in the wet / extended use / panic power). The thing is that frames have special mounts for disks (The LHT is available as a disk frame) and the forces through the wheel are dramatically different. (hub trying to run faster than the rim vs. hub trying to run slower than the rim) My local wheel builder (Peter White) is "old school" like me so to keep things simple I went with canti's and a traditional frame. I was also going for a slightly retro look to the bike so canti's (especially the Mafac clone Paul's) were perfect.

As for the price you are right, the decision I started with was CoMotion Pangea off the shelf or a full custom build, I went this route thinking I would be in the same ball park for price. It actually came out under because I still would have swapped the saddle etc...
« Last Edit: October 27, 2011, 11:20:05 am by Joe B »

Offline waynemyer

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Re: Building up a LHT frame
« Reply #6 on: October 28, 2011, 12:36:08 am »
I am a huge fan of disc brakes, but I really bristle whenever I read any person talking about the great braking power of one system or another, regardless of design. Pretty much all modern, quality brake systems have the same braking power: once the wheel is locked up, there is no additional braking power to be had. Just about every decent system out there can do this. And locking up the wheel is indicative of a loss of friction with the pavement.

The tradeoffs are in modulation (this is the implicit biggie for most people), ease of maintenance, weight, foul-weather performance, and longevity of any given aspect of the system.

Peter White is a great wheelbuilder, but he's no Gerd Schraner or Jobst Brandt; one measurement is worth 1000 opinions, even if the opinion is Peter White's. The forces involved for loaded touring with disc brakes are easily addressed with conventional wheelbuilding techniques. If you're feeling the disc love, find a wheelbuilder that thinks as you do; avoid the wheelbuilder that is mired in baseless biases. Whatever you do, read both Schraner's and Brandt's books on wheels and don't let wheelbuilders make you think that there is any kind of voodoo or obscure knowledge in wheelbuilding. The science and engineering of the bicycle wheel is quite simple (although maybe not easy) and accessible.
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