Adventure Cycling Association Forum

Bicycle Travel => Gear Talk => Topic started by: junction37 on March 09, 2012, 03:00:03 pm

 
Title: Wheel Skewer verses Bolt
Post by: junction37 on March 09, 2012, 03:00:03 pm
From across pond.
I will be buying Phil Wood hubs for my solo for use on touring and commuting.  I have to choose if I want quick release for a Wheel Skewer, or Axle Bolt fastening.   The axle bolts are allen key/hexagon key drive bolts and if ordered are supplied by Phil Wood, they do not supply wheel skewers.  Is there any particular reason for choosing a Skewer rather than a Bolt or a Bolt rather than a Skewer.
Thanks.
Title: Re: Wheel Skewer verses Bolt
Post by: pmac on March 09, 2012, 03:29:18 pm
I have a mountain bike with QR rather than bolt-on axles, instead of skewers.  From a touring point of view, you won't be able to use a trailers like a BOB, which uses a replacement skewer to attach the trailer to the bike if you go with the axles.  But that may not be an issue from you if you use panniers.  There are a couple of seatpost mounted trailers which avoid that issue, but they are not nearly as common.  I think using a QR skewer would also be alot easier if you get a flat.     
Title: Re: Wheel Skewer verses Bolt
Post by: John Nelson on March 09, 2012, 05:26:05 pm
Some people use the bolt if they're afraid of wheel theft. But wheel theft isn't that common.
Title: Re: Wheel Skewer verses Bolt
Post by: johnsondasw on March 09, 2012, 05:44:27 pm
Some people use the bolt if they're afraid of wheel theft. But wheel theft isn't that common.
Especially rear wheel theft.  I always run my lock throught the wheels, too.  Rear wheels are enough of a pain even when  you're not trying to furtively rip one off!  I often remove the front wheel when locking up and lock it with the chain next to the bike, then run the helmet strap through the rear wheel/frame.  Try to make it a major pain to steal the bike and or wheels.
Title: Re: Wheel Skewer verses Bolt
Post by: DaveB on March 09, 2012, 05:53:25 pm
From a wheel security standpoint (fastening the wheels to the dropouts, not theft prevention) good, properly designed internal cam qr skewers such as Shimano and Campy versions are actually more secure than nutted axles.  Tightened properly they cannot loosen spontaneously. 
Title: Re: Wheel Skewer verses Bolt
Post by: PeteJack on March 14, 2012, 04:03:14 pm
Quote
Tightened properly they cannot loosen spontaneously. 
Never thought of that. Has anyone heard of nuts, e.g. the oddball anti-theft types, coming undone? I'd guess the left one would tend to loosen if this happens at all.
Title: Re: Wheel Skewer verses Bolt
Post by: waynemyer on March 15, 2012, 10:49:24 am
Has anyone heard of nuts, e.g. the oddball anti-theft types, coming undone? I'd guess the left one would tend to loosen if this happens at all.
I had a set of OnGuard "locking" skewers. The front "nut" would work loose quite regularly, despite reefing down on the key with a length of pipe. Other security skewers have not given me any issue.
Title: Re: Wheel Skewer verses Bolt
Post by: PeteJack on March 15, 2012, 12:30:06 pm
Quote
The front "nut" would work loose quite regularly
Another thing I hadn't thought of. This is probably why having the skewer locking mechanism on the LH side matters. (It's easy to get it wrong on the front wheel) I never realized there was a sound practical reason for what I thought was just a convention. Gawd, is there no limit to the things I haven't thought of?
Title: Re: Wheel Skewer verses Bolt
Post by: adventurepdx on March 16, 2012, 03:17:09 pm
But wheel theft isn't that common.

Well, touring through rural areas, yes. But in cities, it is more common. I regularly pass by bicycles locked up here in Portland with front/rear/both wheels missing. Of course, many of those bikes were only frame-locked and may have sat overnight. But I do know some folks who have gotten a front wheel yanked when they left a bike locked for only a few hours. So it's a good idea to lock wheels and frame in an urban area. For that reason my bikes either have skewers or bolt-on wheels.

And Portland has gotten to the point where thieves are starting to prey on Brooks saddles as well.
Title: Re: Wheel Skewer verses Bolt
Post by: bpeschka on March 17, 2012, 10:59:35 pm
I have a mountain bike with QR rather than bolt-on axles, instead of skewers.  From a touring point of view, you won't be able to use a trailers like a BOB, which uses a replacement skewer to attach the trailer to the bike if youe go with the axles.  But that may not be an issue from you if you use panniers.  There are a couple of seatpost mounted trailers which avoid that issue, but they are not nearly as common.  I think using a QR skewer would also be alot easier if you get a flat.   

BOBGesr sells replacement nuts for threaded axles to accommodate the Yak and Ibex trailers.  Look for Bob Nutz
Title: Re: Wheel Skewer verses Bolt
Post by: pmac on March 19, 2012, 09:40:25 am

BOBGesr sells replacement nuts for threaded axles to accommodate the Yak and Ibex trailers.  Look for Bob Nutz
[/quote]

That would be nice if it was the case.  My mtn bike, and apparently an increasing number of other mtn bikes, use a 12mm thru axle, which is not compatible with Bob Nutz.  I spent a fair amount of time talking with the Bob folks to confirm that.  However, I recently purchased a farfarer seatpost mounted trailer that works around that issue. 
Title: Re: Wheel Skewer verses Bolt
Post by: jcscycles on April 14, 2012, 11:01:00 am
There is a product called "axle release" that will give you quick release capability with a solid threaded axle. It comes in models machined for either 3/8"x26t, 3/8"x24t, or M10x1.0 axles. We have used them on our own bicycles, and they work just fine. A solid axle is a better bet for loaded touring or trailer use, especially off-road.