Adventure Cycling Association Forum

Bicycle Travel => General Discussion => Topic started by: JasmineReeseII on February 17, 2013, 10:35:09 am

 
Title: Guide to Poor Woman's Cycling
Post by: JasmineReeseII on February 17, 2013, 10:35:09 am
Hello Everyone,

I am new to the forums, so hello! I am leaving and biking across America in April. This is the best time for me to go from an emotional standpoint as well as a scheduling standpoint. However, it's not the best time financially. I am a broke, in debt college student. But I fear if I base my adventures and goals in life on money, I will never be able to accomplish my dreams. I've been trying to raise money and have even started an account with GoFundMe. Not much luck.

I came on to this website and saw terms such as minimalist touring and budget cycling. I would love to hear all your tips on how to make this the most inexpensive, lightweight trip possible and what your experiences were as "poor" or "budget" cyclists. Sorry if there is another forum post on this topic.

Also, I am looking for used equipment, so if you have anything you can sell for a reasonable price or donate for free, please send me an email. I will be indebted to you.  Thank you so much!
Title: Re: Guide to Poor Woman's Cycling
Post by: John Nelson on February 17, 2013, 02:08:00 pm
I agree with you that trying to raise money with no other reason than that you're broke is a tough way to go. So touring on the cheap is probably the best realistic option. Nevertheless, I wouldn't go unless you have at least $10 a day to spend while on tour and another few hundred dollars in emergency funds in case any of your gear or body fails.

Ways to go cheap:
Title: Re: Guide to Poor Woman's Cycling
Post by: 2riders on February 17, 2013, 09:42:33 pm
First of all welcome.  I really don't mean to pry, but you did mention not only are you broke but you are in college debt.  Perhaps before you start on your great adventure (and I encourage you to do so) it would be wise to find some way to pay off your school debt and save some money for your journey.  It would take some stress off of you and make for a more enjoyable ride with an also much favorable ride setup.  Hope it all works out for you.
Title: Re: Guide to Poor Woman's Cycling
Post by: mcparsons on February 17, 2013, 10:15:08 pm
You don't say how much cycling experience you have.  That makes a difference in what kinds of advice you need.  I'm a big fan of traveling cheap and it can be done.  Some examples:

1.  I use a Coleman tent - you might find one at Goodwill or a garage sale otherwise you'll spend $50.  The Hooligan is a 1 person tent that won't feel claustrophobic.  Not light but unless you go with just a tarp and rope your lightweight options cost money.
2.  I bought a gas stove on Amazon (this one http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004YLU6O6/ref=oh_details_o01_s00_i01?ie=UTF8&psc=1 but there are others).  And no-name fuel canisters are cheapest at Walmart.  Or get a dual fuel stove that uses unleaded gas.
3.  I use a second hand pot with the handle removed.
4.  Low temp sleeping bags are expensive.  Use a bag liner and extra clothing layers to stretch what you have.
5.  If you don't do your own maintenance spend some money on having your bike checked.  Mechanical issues can create lots of expense and make your trip miserable.
6.  If you don't have a bike, look for a name brand hybrid on Craigslist.  A Trek FX, Giant FCR or similar will cost you $250 to $350. 
7.  Nashbar has suitable, cheap gear like racks and panniers though you can get by with some other arrangement like Tidy Cat panniers or some kind of sturdy duffel. 
8.  Food is your biggest expense on the road and will cost you more than you think.  5000 calories a day won't come cheap.  Oatmeal, noodles, and rice can give you energy but you need protein too.  But I've found that beans with hotdogs in them taste amazingly good on the road.

If you make the budget part of the adventure it can be fun - but it often won't be comfortable.  As I told my wife, "I'm not on vacation, I'm practicing being homeless."

Only you know your limits and your motivation.  But don't let your complete lack of preparation or resources stand in your way.  People have done it with less.  (Like this guy:    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Stevens_%28cyclist%29)
Title: Re: Guide to Poor Woman's Cycling
Post by: Dr. John on February 18, 2013, 04:31:47 pm
Hi Jasmine,  I have known so many who have never reached their dreams because they waited until the time was right - it never is.  Check the web for long-distance backpacking - there should be many tips, especially for ultralight backpacking.  I've seen people make tents, groundcloths and even packs out of Tyvek (a house wrap used in construction).  As far as a stove search for alcohol stoves or beer can stoves you can make yourself and use denatured alcohol found in hardware stores, or high-proof isopropyl alcohol from drug stores or Heet from gas stations.  What equipment do you need?  What kind of bike do you have?  I might have something around I  can give you.  I can also tell you that at post offices on the Pacific Crest (hiking) trail as well as hostels on the PCT and Appalachian trail, hikers will have mail drops for resupply and often have too much food which they leave behind.  A blog while your traveling might help raise money. 
Check out these links at Rivbike.com:
http://www.rivbike.com/kb_results.asp?ID=69
http://www.rivbike.com/kb_results.asp?ID=70
I wish you all the best.
Title: Re: Guide to Poor Woman's Cycling
Post by: JasmineReeseII on February 19, 2013, 03:22:23 am
Wow, thanks for all the advice. Dr. John, you are so right about waiting for the perfect time. If I waited for my debt to be paid down, I'd be biking across America when I'm 65. Lol, I have a lot of student debt! 

I am starting from scratch, so I can use anything. I am saving up for the Surly Long Haul Trucker. I don't have panniers, a tent, a sleeping bag or other such accessories. I plan on getting that stuff, but if you have something lying around that you don't need anymore, I would gladly and appreciatively take it. My email is jbrzr3@gmail.com.  I am starting a blog, so I am excited about that.
Title: Re: Guide to Poor Woman's Cycling
Post by: JHamelman on February 19, 2013, 10:37:48 am
Hey Jasmine,

Good to see this is still going to happen! Good for you. =)

If you are not already connected with a local bike club, do so. You'll meet some great people who can help you prepare and perhaps hook you up with used gear or gear you can borrow. You can start your search here for clubs nearby:

http://mobikefed.org//moclubs-organizations

Also, though I love the Long Haul Trucker (got one in black), don't discount other bikes that may show up. Another poster suggested Craigslist for a used bike. Good deals can be had here, bring along one of your new club friends to help you evaluate what you find.

Keep moving forward, you can do it!

.Jennifer.
Title: Re: Guide to Poor Woman's Cycling
Post by: Dr. John on February 19, 2013, 11:28:50 pm
Jasmine, I’ll drop you an email in a few days but here are some more ideas which might be useful to others too. 
Try this link for cheap rain gear:
http://gossamergear.com/wp/tips/tip-of-the-week-make-a-hooded-tyvek-rain-jacket-and-chaps-for-under-10
also, hit the tab for Tips and Tricks on this page.
If you are ambitious you can try making your own tent.  I have seen the Tarptent (retail version) on many of the long distance hiking trails.  Here’s a link if you want to try to make your own.
http://www.tarptent.com/projects/tarpdesign.html
Or you might just use a sheet of Tyvek as a tarp.  Tyvek can be purchased at Home Depot, etc. but you might be able to bum some for free off of a construction site or a friend in construction.  I thru-hiked the Appalachian Trail one time with just a tarp – it works pretty well, but can get buggy - but it is light!
Another idea for a stove just uses twigs for fuel – you would need to keep a few in your panniers in case of wet weather.  N. Nomad is a bit of a legend in the hiking world and this is what he made:
http://www.nimblewillnomad.com/stove.htm
Backpackers are known to Yogi food (as in Yogi Bear and Jellystone Park) when passing thru picnic areas, i.e. sit at a table next to a group grilling hamburgers etc. and drool :P (we do this usually because we want a break from trail food).  Often someone will offer you some food.  I knew one girl who would just walk up to picnickers and ask if she could buy a hamburger off them – almost invariably they would just give her one.
Once when going to town to resupply on the A.T., I stopped in a bar and met another hiker.  He was hiking on the cheap.  While having a beer with him he asked the bartender if she knew if anyone had any work, and told her he could paint.  She made a few calls and found someone who needed their house painted!  I know it is more difficult now, but in the past it wasn’t that uncommon for people to work their way along on the journey.  I think the trick is to mention a skill – perhaps cleaning(?)  And certainly you know you can leave the violin case open for tips.
You can’t go wrong with a LHT, but whatever you get, make sure it is the right size.  I am long-legged, 6’1” and a 58cm frame fits me well.  By the way, I am trying to learn Liszt’s version of La Campanella on the piano - can you play Paganini’s?  It just might take me as long as it takes you to pay off your student loans :'(!


Title: Re: Guide to Poor Woman's Cycling
Post by: Dr. John on February 19, 2013, 11:46:30 pm
Forgot one other thing -  I've seen people get a work-for-stay at hostels (especially small, unaffiliated ones) and occasionally mom and pop hotels - it can't hurt to ask.
Title: Re: Guide to Poor Woman's Cycling
Post by: cmtbiz on February 20, 2013, 04:55:32 pm
Hi Jasmine,

Look at it this way... I know you said you have up to the neck with your student loans. 
You will eventually pay them off sooner or later but not till you reach 65. LOL   
You will be paid well and that will slowly diminish your loans... only if you go out to look for a job.  :)

So go ahead get your ride as soon as you can and worry about the debts later. =) This will be ride now pay later plan. lol

Good luck to your venture.  I will be doing my first time long ride also for coming April.

Cheers!
CT

Wow, thanks for all the advice. Dr. John, you are so right about waiting for the perfect time. If I waited for my debt to be paid down, I'd be biking across America when I'm 65. Lol, I have a lot of student debt! 

I am starting from scratch, so I can use anything. I am saving up for the Surly Long Haul Trucker. I don't have panniers, a tent, a sleeping bag or other such accessories. I plan on getting that stuff, but if you have something lying around that you don't need anymore, I would gladly and appreciatively take it. My email is jbrzr3@gmail.com.  I am starting a blog, so I am excited about that.
Title: Re: Guide to Poor Woman's Cycling
Post by: JasmineReeseII on February 20, 2013, 06:12:58 pm
Thanks!  Those are all wonderful sites. I am thinking about making my own panniers. But I'll see if something inexpensive comes along before starting. I am not sure if I can make a tent, but maybe I can ask a friend (who is a little more creative than me) to do it. That would be fun! 
Title: Re: Guide to Poor Woman's Cycling
Post by: MidSouth on February 20, 2013, 10:19:53 pm
Saw your post in the Classified section and it seems taking a 65 lb dog and

1. Bike Tow Leash or Springer America
2. A water resistant blanket such as Tuffo brand with carrying case.
3. Water Proof Seal Line Bags for food.
4. Sleeping Bag for doggy.
5. Clothes and padded doggy shoes

goes against the minimalist and lightweight touring frame of mind...
Title: Re: Guide to Poor Woman's Cycling
Post by: 2riders on February 21, 2013, 07:31:29 am
Saw your post in the Classified section and it seems taking a 65 lb dog and

1. Bike Tow Leash or Springer America
2. A water resistant blanket such as Tuffo brand with carrying case.
3. Water Proof Seal Line Bags for food.
4. Sleeping Bag for doggy.
5. Clothes and padded doggy shoes

goes against the minimalist and lightweight touring frame of mind...

Sorry, but have to agree with MidSouth.  This is getting interesting.
Title: Re: Guide to Poor Woman's Cycling
Post by: JasmineReeseII on February 21, 2013, 08:40:30 am
Yeah, I might have to take my dog since I can't afford boarding, and I don't believe in giving up animals just because... She's my best friend, so she'll have to come along. However, that doesn't mean me as a person can't pack light. Even more so now, I need to be minimalist for myself, excluding my dogs stuff. However, I am sending her food to different areas, so I won't have to carry a huge bag of food. Also, her trailer can fit some of my stuff, so it would be great to not have to buy or search for as many panniers. I can take one or two panniers as opposed to 4 or 5 like I've seen. Also, I'll still only need one tent, since my dog can share that with me. Only thing I'll need extra is a blanket, leash, and proper clothing for my dog which all lightweight and most definitely not super expensive, especially if used.

I have seen many sites on where people have successfully and affordably taken their dogs, so that doesn't mean I can't budget. It may not be a lightweight trip, but most definitely can still be a low-budget one. One bag of dog food lasts two and a half months, unlike human food which is way expensive. My dogs will barely add any expenses to the trip. So, I'm not really worried. Crazyguyonabike has an article devoted to taking dogs and I like the benefits!

If I can successfully take my dog and self across America on a minimal budget, I will gladly share my story, so y'all can do it, too. Until then, I appreciate the advice you give, so that I can make it happen.
Title: Re: Guide to Poor Woman's Cycling
Post by: JasmineReeseII on February 21, 2013, 08:48:12 am
Excluding this guy's dog trailer in the back, he seemed to pack extremely light for himself, or put all his stuff in the trailer. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LPCoIBZxgao
Title: Re: Guide to Poor Woman's Cycling
Post by: pmac on February 21, 2013, 10:03:28 am
Jasmine, before you decide to set off on a cross-country tour with a 65 lb dog in a trailer, plus all of the other stuff you will need for your dog, camping, bike repairs, cooking, eating etc, you really need to do some fully loaded test rides to see if that is feasible for you.  Just ballparking it, my guess is that you would be towing 100+ lbs.  I think you are significantly underestimating the difficulty of towing the weight you are contemplating.  While touring I tow a farfarer trailer with about 40-45 lbs of gear and I consider that pretty heavy.  Maybe your dog can walk up the hills which would help you ALOT, although that make create a hazardous situation for you and/or your dog.  While  some people can carry/tow significant weight, a review of the many trip reports found on CGOAB indicates that most, but not all, people will do whatever they can to drop even 5 lbs from their carrying weight after just a couple of days on the road.  From the armchair, all bike tours take place on sunny days, going downhill with a tailwind.  While that sometimes happens, the general reality is bit different.  A few 2-3 day short tours with some hills and realistic mileage goals in the months leading up to your cross-country tour will go a long way to helping you understand what will actually work for you.     
Title: Re: Guide to Poor Woman's Cycling
Post by: JasmineReeseII on February 21, 2013, 10:39:47 am
Thank you, Pmac. We are doing a couple of tours in March with rented equipment from my local bike shop. I guess I'll find out then what's doable and what's not.
Title: Re: Guide to Poor Woman's Cycling
Post by: Westinghouse on March 28, 2013, 05:31:16 am
Good luck if you get underway. The advice you have read here is just about it. I would add there are lots of out-of-the-way places like country churches that have a water hose out back where you can get showered well at night. Perhaps you're not supposed to do that. I don't know. I have many times. John Nelson is right on with his advice; however, I  will not go without my Cytomax and a steady supply of it mailed forward. Also, I must have a beer occasionally.

It looks like I might be doing a transcon after this June 2013. Our times are out of sync. Depending on your route, you can carry only a very light blanket, and if on the ST you might get by with using it as a pillow. I will most likely do the ST. I prefer not to do it in summer, but that seems to be the hand that destiny is dealing me at the time.

Perhaps my next comment is out of line. I do not believe you should do any route hauling a 65-pound dog. The Atlantic coast is the only route for that because it is compartively level.

Any well made bike frame will get you there. Used ones are available for a song. $250.00 will put you in the way of all new components you need to add. Not top of the line but definitely functional. Probably $300.00 total, around 1 / 4 the price of a SLHT. I have been using the same old Raleigh frame for years on long, strenuous tours. No problem whatsoever. When it is time to go I get new pedals, bearings, wheels, tires, tubes, brake pads, chain, freewheel, spindle or cassette, maybe a deraileur. I get there just as quickly and efficiently as anyone on a $1200.00 bicycle. It's doable.
Title: Re: Guide to Poor Woman's Cycling
Post by: PeteJack on March 28, 2013, 10:28:09 am
Good luck Jasmine with the dog business, that's a heck of a load, not to mention possible vet bills (if you can find one). There are posts on this site by people who wanted to take dogs, search them out. As for a bike, the LHT is a fine machine but it is a lot of money. In Kentucky I met a young bloke who had rode from Los Angeles on an old Schwinn he'd found at the side of the road. His rain gear was a black garbage back with holes for head and arms. He seemed happy enough. Whatever you end up using be sure it has good wheels, 36 spoke minimum, built by a reliable builder who knows how you are going to use them. Apart from broken spokes pretty much anything else that can go wrong you can fix yourself. Have you done a bike maintenance class? Some places: bike clubs, YMCA, LBSs possibly have them for free or cheap. (If you are really keen take a wheelbuilding class then you can save a lot of money on bombproof wheels by building your own and you'll have no fear of breaking a spoke. But that may be a bit much) It's good for your ego if you're fiddling with your bike and a passerby asks if you need help to be able to say "No thanks. I'm good"

I was going to sail round the wold when I got the ideal boat. I never did. If I'm honest with myself it was an excuse for not doing it. So get out there and do it with whatever you can scrounge up.
Title: Re: Guide to Poor Woman's Cycling
Post by: DanE on March 28, 2013, 12:03:33 pm
Being young with no money and wanting to hit the road with your dog, sounds like Svein Tuft all over again to me. He did this very thing and ended up with several national championships and a medal at worlds.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/08/sports/othersports/08cycling.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0
Title: Re: Guide to Poor Woman's Cycling
Post by: JasmineReeseII on March 28, 2013, 01:16:18 pm
Dan, that's a remarkable news article! He makes what I'm doing seem like child's play. lol

Howdy y'all!  I am successfully riding with my doggy after finding other people who are doing the same thing. I wasn't able to pack lightweight. After I created a website, I received a slew of donated equipment, including a tent and sleeping bag and stuff for my doggy. We leave officially April 15, 2013, but smaller tours have been wonderful. There is a long list of people who have toured the States and the World with dogs successfully. Please feel free to add my website and name to that list once I finish: http://fijabam.com/

BTW, there are many amazing trailers specifically made for hauling dogs. They are heavy duty and it almost feels like your dog isn't back there. I would recommend the Doggy Ride and te Cycletote.

Thank you!
Title: Re: Guide to Poor Woman's Cycling
Post by: e46rick on March 28, 2013, 08:29:31 pm
Being young with no money and wanting to hit the road with your dog, sounds like Svein Tuft all over again to me. He did this very thing and ended up with several national championships and a medal at worlds.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/08/sports/othersports/08cycling.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

Thanks for that.
I knew of Tuft as a pro cyclist but I didn't know anything of his background.  Very interesting story.
Title: Re: Guide to Poor Woman's Cycling
Post by: Westinghouse on March 29, 2013, 11:46:23 am
I saw your blog. Your post should read---Poor No More.

I am an experienced cyclist. I once did a 4500 mile tour over many hills and mountains carrying 60-70 pounds of gear. It was extremely difficult at times. When you get into long steep climbs you will see. Perhaps you are being underestimated because you are a woman. Who knows. You might take those hills easily. In my general estimation, having no knowledge of your physical capabilities, I would say it is too much weight for the Transam. Can it be done? Yes it can be done carrying 90 to 100 pounds of gear. However, there is a difference between a nice, reasonably easy, transcontinental cycling tour, and a grueling, difficult, grinding, laborious, tendon-tearing task. Perhaps you can do it. You must be the judge of your own abilities. I would not want to grind that kind of weight over all those hills. That is a very hilly route. The Atlantic route is really better suited for that kind of a load. Take the stock front chain rings and put them away. Get smaller chain rings.

This is  my opinion. I wish you the best on your journey.
Title: Re: Guide to Poor Woman's Cycling
Post by: habanero on March 29, 2013, 01:40:07 pm
I've done my share of touring including the Lewis & Clark and the Transam.  My question is whether this forum is the proper place to be asking for monetary donations for a personal tour.  In this particular case, perhaps another loan or help from family and friends would be more appropriate!
Title: Re: Guide to Poor Woman's Cycling
Post by: JasmineReeseII on March 29, 2013, 03:49:03 pm
@Habanero, I'm sorry, but where did I ask for a monetary donation? I asked for used equipment that I could buy or equipment that could be donated for free. That's not monetary. Also, that was not the base point for my post; I actually needed advice about lightweight cycling and how I could budget optimally. Please don't be so quick to judge a post without reading the details.

P.S. And although I am biking for the Missouri Lions Eye Research Foundation, many generous people have donated equipment to me as opposed to money. Whether it's a personal tour or whatever, that's their prerogative to do that. And I am so happy to them for making my dreams come true. Not everyone has the means to save up for a tour and I don't mind using worn or used equipment. I am glad people thought about me, dusted off their unused equipment and let me have it. That's thoughtful. But once again, that's not what my original post was about.

Thank you.
Title: Re: Guide to Poor Woman's Cycling
Post by: JasmineReeseII on March 29, 2013, 03:55:00 pm
@Westinghouse, Thank you for your advice. I am actually looking at State Maps to see how I can get to San Francisco without too much struggle. If the going gets tough, I'll have to suck it up. I am going to take my time.

I did do a route in Missouri a few months back that was mostly hills. It took me several hours because I had to keep getting off my bike and walking up the hills. And that was unloaded. I've since built up the stamina for those hills.

Sometimes you just gotta try in life and if it doesn't work out, at least you can say you tried it.
Title: Re: Guide to Poor Woman's Cycling
Post by: Westinghouse on March 29, 2013, 05:15:42 pm
Starting in the west you may need rain gear and cool weather gear for the mountains. You could encounter snow in the higher elevations west of Denver. Once below Denver mail your cold weather gear. Keep the minimum necessary. Many people will not use a tarp. However, a silnylon tarp is the lightest. Don't buy one. Make one. Instructions are on you tube. The taivek raingear can be had for very cheap and it's breathable. The next lightest shelter is a polytarp. I have used one in summer and winter. No complaints except the bugs. Mosquito coils or bug juice works. The good thing about the poly tarp is you can throw it over yourself and your gear in a sudden downpour and it will keep you dry, to an extent. I am not sure about a several hours long torrential downpour. Nylon bleeds through where it touches. A string tied between trees and some lightweight aluminum tent pegs from Wally World and you are ready for camp. Wally's also has a blue, closed cell, foam pad for about $7.00. It works just fine. You must use good cycling shoes. Those are a must for those hills and that kind of a load.
Title: Re: Guide to Poor Woman's Cycling
Post by: JasmineReeseII on March 29, 2013, 05:27:53 pm
Starting in the west you may need rain gear and cool weather gear for the mountains. You could encounter snow in the higher elevations west of Denver. Once below Denver mail your cold weather gear. Keep the minimum necessary. Many people will not use a tarp. However, a silnylon tarp is the lightest. Don't buy one. Make one. Instructions are on you tube. The taivek raingear can be had for very cheap and it's breathable. The next lightest shelter is a polytarp. I have used one in summer and winter. No complaints except the bugs. Mosquito coils or bug juice works. The good thing about the poly tarp is you can throw it over yourself and your gear in a sudden downpour and it will keep you dry, to an extent. I am not sure about a several hours long torrential downpour. Nylon bleeds through where it touches. A string tied between trees and some lightweight aluminum tent pegs from Wally Word and you are ready for camp. Wally's also has a blue, closed cell, foam pad for about $7.00. It works just fine. You must use good cycling shoes. Those are a must for those hills and that kind of a load.

I'm actually starting in NYC and headed East. I've planned my route down to Virginia, but based on previous advice, I wonder if I should steer clear of the TransAm or rough it and be a bad mamajama by the time I reach San Francisco, and go down to San Diego.  :)  I probably want to avoid it for my first long distance tour. Is East to West worse than West to East?
Title: Re: Guide to Poor Woman's Cycling
Post by: John Nelson on March 29, 2013, 07:38:37 pm
based on previous advice, I wonder if I should steer clear of the TransAm...Is East to West worse than West to East?
Steer clear of the TransAm? Whatever for?

Early starting dates favor beginning in the East.
Title: Re: Guide to Poor Woman's Cycling
Post by: Westinghouse on March 30, 2013, 04:25:20 am
Going east to west on the TA will put you into some serious hill climbing within a few days. BIKE 30 pounds. Dog 65. Trailer 8? All gear 25-30. That's 130 pounds. You maybe 130. 260 pounds. That's a lot of weight to go over steep hills day after day, week after week. My advice is to stay on the AC route. Don't let me dissuade you from the Transam. I am just giving you what I think is good advice. Set a realistic goal. Maybe you can do the transam easily enough with all that weight. I don't know. I am making generalizations based on my own experiences, and based on the experiences of other cyclists whose journals I have been reading for several years. Most people mail things home after they are on the road for a while. Just saying. Keep us posted. I am interested in finding out how matters proceed for you.
Title: Re: Guide to Poor Woman's Cycling
Post by: PeteJack on April 04, 2013, 03:40:49 pm
Quote
I did do a route in Missouri a few months back that was mostly hills.

I found it so myself and people I've met who've done the Transam agree that Missouri is the hardest part. By the time you get to it, Hoosier pass it will be a piece of cake. Be very careful hurtling downhill with a trailer. In particular brake very carefully. I've never rode with a trailer but I've heard horror stories of trailers jackknifing on fast descents causing a crash. Do some research on this please.
Title: Re: Guide to Poor Woman's Cycling
Post by: richardr on April 26, 2013, 01:46:43 pm
A great resource for journals on cycling tours is crazyguyonabike.com.  I remember reading several by a couple who ride a tandem trike and tow their large dog, Django.  When they start climbing, he gets out of the trailer and walks.  Trikes are well suited for slow up hill travel and managing a dog.  Personally, I feel they are a great option.
Title: Re: Guide to Poor Woman's Cycling
Post by: JasmineReeseII on June 18, 2013, 09:20:16 pm
Hi Guys! I'm doing it! Carrying 105 pounds including my doggy. Lol My website is http://fijabam.com/

I am in Pittsburgh right now. Is there a good route to Columbus, OH?
Title: Re: Guide to Poor Woman's Cycling
Post by: Westinghouse on June 21, 2013, 05:37:22 am
I just saw you blog and youtube. You should keep going. You're in Pittsburgh, so I think you took the tow paths. That's good. The comparatively flat terrain will give you time to get your legs under you before you hit the hills.

There are three designated bike paths running NS / SN in Ohio. I have not used them. I saw them only on a map. If you google designated / dedicated bike paths in Ohio, you should be able to locate them.