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Bicycle Travel => General Discussion => Topic started by: sspeed on April 10, 2013, 11:52:53 am

 
Title: touring without "eating out"
Post by: sspeed on April 10, 2013, 11:52:53 am
A friend of mine and I are planning on 11 day tour from Denver to Iowa, going across Nebraska.  I have about everything tentatively planned, but a little lost on the food.

I did read this post:

http://www.adventurecycling.org/forums/index.php?topic=11503.0

It was a good start, but I didn't want to threadjack.

My friend has challenged me to do the trip without eating at restaurants.  I really don't care either way, so I'm up for the challenge.  I'm just concerned that we'll be getting enough calories and not getting completely bored with the food selection.

My friend is going to try the MountainHouse meals.

http://www.mountainfoodstorage.com/

I looked and they are about 150-220 calories per packet.

I have no idea if this is right, but I ride fully loaded to work and back about 1-4 times a week, average twice a week over the course of a year.  I average about 145 bpm for a heart rate (my max is a silly 199).  The Garmin HR says I burn about 650 calories per hour when doing that, can that really be right?  It's consistent when I look back at the huge log of rides I have to work and back. 

Here's an example ride to work...

http://connect.garmin.com/activity/295157214

I'm concerned about getting enough quality food if we do grocery stores and gas stations only.  What are some suggestions for success in this case?
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: paddleboy17 on April 10, 2013, 01:10:39 pm
I have not done freeze dried since my back packing class, but back then they all tasted the same, salty.

My buddy and I do week long trips and eat pretty good.  We always carry an extra days worth of food, in case we cannot resupply.  If you want to explore the wonderful world of real food, here are some brief tips.

1. Aluminum and Ti cookware are great for boiling water, but real cooking takes stainless steel.  We use an MSR Alpine 2 pot kit, and a small GSI teapot.
2. 2 stoves are great, one for cooking and one for heating water.  We use a pair on Trangia Alcohol stoves (but not with their pots).  There are other stoves out there, just read the threads...
3. Foil pouch chicken is great.  You can also get salmon and that is not bad.  You can decide about everything else, but we found canned shrimp to be wretched. I was raised Roman Catholic and I am permanently scarred by canned or foil pouch tuna fish (my Protestant wife loves the stuff).
4. You can make a great marinara sauce from a small tin of corned beef, just know that the sodium is high.  Maybe just as high as freeze dried food.
5. You can do a lot with whole wheat pasta and whole grains.
6. Oatmeal, grits, and cream of wheat are the staples of breakfast.
7. Peanut butter, jelly, and tortillas travel well.
8. Condensed canned milk and canned parmesan cheese is the basis for great white sauces.  You can get a couple of days out of the parmesan cheese before you have to toss it as garbage.
9. Plan to resupply regularly, maybe even daily.  I once resupplied from a party store on Cape Breton Island that mostly sold beer, but I made a fabulous dinner from Rice-A-Roni, canned peas, and canned chicken, and promptly exhausted their food section.

Regardless of what kind of food you carry, practice bear bagging.  It works for varmints too.
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: staehpj1 on April 10, 2013, 01:23:15 pm
My suggestion is to skip the freeze dried meals.  They are expensive, not especially appetizing, and generally not very available along the way.

Never carry more than a couple days of meals and buy daily along the way.  Do carry a bit of emergency food to carry you over, just in case.  It really isn't that hard to find better food than Mountain House meals even at gas station mini marts in my opinion.  There will be times when fresh veggies are scarce, but doing without for a day or two or eating some canned or frozen ones isn't the end of the world.  One thing that I often do is pack a bigger supply of from home is freeze dried peas for those times when veggies are scarce.

We found that we ate a lot on tour.  Possibly as much as 5000 calories per day when cranking out long miles, but I never kept close enough track to be confident with the accuracy of that number.

BTW: I think my GPS estimated calorie numbers are generally too high.
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: Pat Lamb on April 10, 2013, 01:34:11 pm
Freeze dried food is emergency rations, in my book.  Take some for the day when it's getting dark and you're miles from nowhere, but have adequate water.  After a long day's exercise, a two-person pouch is about right for one person.

My daughter introduced me to "hippie pasta."  Pretty good; start with pasta, boil it, add vegetables (fresh, frozen, or canned) to taste, add a pack of chicken or can of tuna, and some cheese or Velveeta.  Vary proportions of ingredients to taste.  Maybe substitute rice for pasta.  Plenty of cheap calories in pasta or rice, more than you'll get from the freeze-dried meal.  Finish off with an apple, or a pint of blackberries or cherries.
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: staehpj1 on April 10, 2013, 04:27:11 pm
Freeze dried food is emergency rations, in my book.

I agree, but they are not all that great even for that.  I have carried them for that and wished I had something else when I did use them.

Personally I'd rather have a pack or ramen noodles and a foil pack of tuna or chicken.  I find that if you cook the ramen noodles in just enough water that it cooks almost dry when the noodles are tender.  I also add freeze dried peas in the beginning, if I have them.  That or a can of peas can be added at the end if I have them.  When using this method I add the flavor packet in the beginning since I do not discard any liquid.  At the end I add the tuna and butter, margarine, or olive oil if I have them.  I sometimes stir in some chunks of hard cheese (I like extra sharp cheddar), again if I happen to have them.  Those ingredients can be easily replaced along the way if used, except maybe the freeze dried peas.
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: sspeed on April 10, 2013, 04:49:48 pm
These are all great suggestions and I appreciate them.  What is a foil pack of chicken?  Is that something you can buy at the grocery store or something that is made?  Apologies for the dumb question, I want to try some of these out ahead of time.
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: John Nelson on April 10, 2013, 05:02:33 pm
I carry a couple of energy bars for emergency food, and I really hope I won't need them. Other than that, everything I carry and eat is bought in stores along the way. There's no need to carry much more than it takes to get to the next town (or maybe the town after that in case everything is closed in the next town).
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: staehpj1 on April 10, 2013, 05:17:46 pm
What is a foil pack of chicken?
I was referring to the tuna and chicken that comes in a foil/mylar pouch with very little to no liquid,  Much lighter than a can.  Salmon and Spam also come in those.
(https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRhWJQHyaprdj70twAj4MTviQUVye6_3tdjl7blV4NcyDuHDbep)
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: sspeed on April 10, 2013, 05:23:16 pm
Ahh, thank you.

For stove I do have an MSR DragonFly (can run on unleaded) and was planning on also making a soda can stove, so the two combined might be good for cooking and water.

I have a stainless steel pot set that I wasn't planning on taking, but you make a good point about real cooking.  It's been awhile since our mountain bike trips to Moab, but it's a real bummer to burn a hole in the bottom of an aluminum pan and be stuck with none.

Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: RussSeaton on April 10, 2013, 05:32:28 pm
I can't add much but I'll try.  I know you said you wanted to avoid restaurants, but maybe you can fudge that a bit.  Convenience stores and many grocery stores have ready to eat food available.  Hot dogs usually at the convenience stores.  Fried chicken and pasta salad and mashed potatoes at the grocery stores.  Maybe supplement your cooking with this food.  As far as cooking, rice and pasta are good for carbohydrates.  Canned tuna and chicken are good for protein.  Add a can of vegetables too.  Macaroni and cheese boxes are good and easy to cook.  Add a can of tuna or chicken into them.  You would need two or three boxes for enough food.  Rice, pasta, mac and cheese, tuna should all be easy to find.  Maybe even convenience stores carry them.  Don't even need a grocery store.
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: matthewjsteger on April 10, 2013, 07:13:28 pm
Depends on how "remote" your ride is, I guess.  During my TransAm ride last fall, I remember that food was freaking everywhere!  I also remember thinking it was odd that so many other cyclists I met along the way seemed to pack enough food for two weeks worth of backcountry backpacking.  I would suggest skipping the "no restaurant" approach, as there are plenty of lovely crossroad diners throughout each of those three states which you'll probably regret not stopping for (for at least chit-chat, if for nothing else).  Good luck!
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: Pat Lamb on April 10, 2013, 09:02:26 pm
I carry a couple of energy bars for emergency food, and I really hope I won't need them.

There was a joke a few years back that I really liked:

PowerBars are great.  You can use them as handlebar tape, and if you get hungry, lean down and bite off a piece!
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: Westinghouse on April 11, 2013, 06:17:05 am
I would suggest you keep fresh fruits and vegetables in your diet every day, when possible. Fruits that are enclosed in a skin can be eaten uncooked. When it comes to carrots, skin them and you're safe. If you have a stove and pot, boil water and just dip fresh vegetables in for say 10 seconds which should be long enough to kill any pathogens, but too short a time to damage nutrients.
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: staehpj1 on April 11, 2013, 10:14:46 am
I would suggest skipping the "no restaurant" approach, as there are plenty of lovely crossroad diners throughout each of those three states which you'll probably regret not stopping for (for at least chit-chat, if for nothing else).
+1
Eating a meal a day in diners is often a big part of the fun for me.  It is a great opportunity to meet the locals and I enjoy diner food as well.
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: DaveB on April 11, 2013, 10:19:48 am
The "no restaurants" approach is very doable but I would NEVER try to subsist on freeze-dried meals unless starvation was the only alternative.  As mentioned above they are expensive, barely tolerable and not very filling.  Your buddy made a foolish bet.  By comparison you could save money by eating only in restaurants.

That said, grocery stores have a huge variety of ready to eat and easy to prepare items and many have hot food and deli counters where you can eat well at moderate cost.
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: sspeed on April 11, 2013, 10:32:18 am
We were talking about it and, like a lot of you mentioned, eating at mom and pop diners is part of the fun.  Maybe a better option is to try and eat out only once a day and use the great ideas here to make camp meals the rest of the time.
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: Pat Lamb on April 11, 2013, 11:42:59 am
That said, grocery stores have a huge variety of ready to eat and easy to prepare items and many have hot food and deli counters where you can eat well at moderate cost.

It varies by location.  You could eat a week's worth of different meals pre-prepared by the grocery stores in my home town, but in some small towns on the TA (eastern Kentucky and western Kansas in particular), sometimes you're lucky if they have any fresh foods.
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: e46rick on April 11, 2013, 12:26:01 pm
Top Ramen - only has to cook for 3 minutes
Cous cous - just bring water to a boil and let it sit for 5 minutes. 
Minute Rice -
 
All three are cheap, easy, light and require relatively little fuel to cook.  They are available at most grocery stores.  Add veggies and/or packaged tuna or chicken to any of them for a more balanced meal. 



Freeze dried meals can get expensive if you're eating them every day.  Plus, they really aren't very good unless you're completely famished, then anything tastes good.
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: Patco on April 11, 2013, 07:41:41 pm
Dehydrated foods have improved considerably over the years. My spouse and I like Mountain House and we have a number of go-to meals that serve us well when backpacking and on bike trips. I suggest you purchase a meal or two and try at home and make up your own mind on whether they are palatable. And yes, you are able to refuel on such meals without harm.
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: Westinghouse on April 12, 2013, 08:11:34 am
Beware of getting caught in the convenience store trap. Sometimesyou might be in a region where you go through small towns for days. Getting in late and on Sundays might force you to use CSs only for a while. If you get the ones that sell prepared pizza, fried chicken, potato logs, maccaroni and cheese, and other deli stuff, you are ok for a while. Others may have plenty to drink but a paucity of nutritional food.  Potato chips and bologna sandwiches don't make it for a day on the road. The beer is always good though.
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: paddleboy17 on April 12, 2013, 12:40:42 pm
Our original poster's trip is only 11 days long.  I guess if he had to, 11 days worth of freeze dried stuff could be carried...

Sounds like we have turned him on to real food. 

I have read tales of backpackers going for a week on just macaroni--I hope I never have to eat like that.  Since his trip is only 11 days, I would think he could research his route and determine where he can resupply and where there are restaurants.  I don't love peanut butter and jelly, so I try to eat lunch in some small town, but I do carry the stuff in case I need it.

He mentioned burning a hole in aluminum.  I have a different argument for stainless steel.  Ti and aluminum cookware is generally so thin walled that it is only of use for boiling water.  Stainless steel cook gear is pretty thin too but there is some heat integration going on and you are less likely to burn whatever you are cooking.  But if all you want to do is boil water, it is hard to beat aluminum.

As for carrying both a white gas stove and an alcohol stove, I would just settle on one.  Just carry one kind of fuel.  We used to take white gas stoves, I had a Whisperlite and my buddy had a Dragonfly.  We converted to alcohol because we found the stoves to be easier to use and we found their lower temp cook flames to be more friendly for food prep.  I also like that if the alcohol fuel bottle leaks  it is no big deal where as if the white gas leaks that could be a big deal.   It is hard to knock the Tragia as it out performs the Super-Cat stoves I used to make.

I think you need to make some test meals at home using your cook gear.  Evaluate how bulky the food items are versus how tasty they are.  See how you feel about food prep and clean up.  Do some test meals with freeze dried stuff and see how you feel about that.  You have not mentioned MREs.  I hear about people buying them and using them.  Our military uses them in field, after the boys field strip them and discard excess packaging before sticking them in a back pack.

I think you got some experimenting to do. ;D
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: indyfabz on April 12, 2013, 03:27:38 pm
For stove I do have an MSR DragonFly (can run on unleaded) and was planning on also making a soda can stove, so the two combined might be good for cooking and water.

I have a Dragon Fly. I cook elaborate meals with it, whether I am going solo or with the GF. Why would you need anything else? When solo, I bring two nesting pots. In one I first cook the "go-with"--something like sausage or boneless chicken cut into strips with whatever vegetables I can find, onion and fresh garlic. Once that's done, I will cook the pasta in the second pot. When that's done, I put the first pot back on the stove for re-heat while I drain the pasta. The formula is the same when there are two of us, only we carry a larger second pot to be able to properly cook enough pasta for two.

Here is a meatless version made in camp in about 40 min. of prep and cooking time:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/davez2007/8642778947/in/photostream

Seems slow, but the water was very cold so it took a while to boil.

As for grocery availability, when you have your route down you can go to Google Maps and search for "Grocery stores near [name of town]". You do have to be careful about hours of operation as you do with restaurants. I have stayed in plenty of small towns where the grocery stores have closed as early as 6 p.m. Your best bet is a larger chain like Safeway.

With all that said, I agree with the others who say that the local cafe, etc., is where many memories are made, even if you just go for a slice of pie after cooking dinner.
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: sspeed on April 13, 2013, 03:43:46 pm
Thanks everyone, for all the replies.  Have definitely turned me on to real food vs the freeze dried stuff, and also convinced me to at least do a few stops in local diners.  I planned on making a lot of test meals, including some of the Mountain House ones just for fun.  I've made a lot of meals with the same items while car camping before, but then you have a big duffel bag full of camp gear with you and things like a bottle of dish soap and all utensils are no big deal.

I posted my route on another thread awhile back.  I have the route down and have also researched the towns.  Google Maps has a nice street view that you can read store names from in the towns.  Quite a few of these towns are near ghost towns and don't have much beyond a gas station and steakhouse.  Many grocery stores have gone out of business along the corridor as bigger towns are half an hour away by car.

Here's my route for fun...

http://www.motate.org/riders/scottdeleeuw/trip/trip.php
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: freightbike on April 14, 2013, 10:32:34 pm
I like to bring a dragonfly stove along with a nonstick frypan and two or three pots nested together. I bring along Krusteaze pancake mix and some blueberry syrup. A couple packs of ramen noodles for emergencies crammed in with the pots. Just about any little store will have canned spaghetti and canned vegetables and some kind of protein, hotdogs, spam, tuna. I pack in some instant potato's to thicken things up when it seems needed. Vary the food by whats available, get amazed by the variety when you get to a town that has a big grocery store with a deli. I put yogurt on the pancakes when it's available. I like the dragonfly because it has a fold up wind screen and a flame adjustment that is much more supple than the other MSR's I've used. I burn white gas when I can get it, including keeping an eye out for other campers who might be using it and buying some off them.
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: indyfabz on April 15, 2013, 10:50:23 am
I've made a lot of meals with the same items while car camping before, but then you have a big duffel bag full of camp gear with you and things like a bottle of dish soap and all utensils are no big deal.

I still use and old MSR Blacklite cook set minus the frying pan. The two pots nest. I put a bandana between the two pots so they don't rub against each other while I am riding. Inside the smaller pot I can fit a folding spatula, a folding pot strainer, sponge, small plastic vial of dish soap, the pot gripper, a few small Nalgene bottles containing spices, a head of garlic, collapsible plastic cork screw and pack towel.

Think small. You are not going to be on the road that long.
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: mbattisti on April 16, 2013, 02:36:58 pm
I would agree to reconsider this touring without eating out challenge.  Part of the highlites of my TransAm trip was the great food and people, conversation, connecting with communities which was made possible in a large part by local mom and pop diners.  Breakfasts are usually cheap, and when you figure in the bottomless cup of Joe, and all the ice and water to fill your bottles, and maybe a few packets of Jam for that bagel 20 miles down the road, all in all a pretty good deal.
We also passed thru some towns where we heard cyclists felt unwelcomed.  Maybe if more cyclists patronized the businesses, instead of just asking to use a bathroom and mooching for water, this wouldn't be an issue.
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: bikeman on April 19, 2013, 11:42:23 pm
Why. 
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: Cat on April 21, 2013, 09:12:29 am
Several of you mention "local mom and pop diner" - What is that?
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: Pat Lamb on April 21, 2013, 11:26:53 am
Several of you mention "local mom and pop diner" - What is that?

Small, locally owned and operated diners are often operated by the owners' family, thus known generically as "Mom and Pop Diner."  They know and are known by the locals, who often will go there for a regular cup of coffee, sometimes a breakfast, every morning.  These restaurants are often the only restaurant option within 15 miles or so, and are often overwhelmed when a chain restaurant opens nearby, as they can't compete with the variety of pre-packaged foods the chains offer.  When they do survive, you can bet it's because of the welcoming atmosphere and fresh, tasty food -- both great reasons to stop and check them out.

On a side note, it's accepted wisdom that when you come into a town and there are several restaurants, go to the one with the parking lot ful of local cars and trucks.  The locals know where the good food and good prices are; out-of-towners will often spring for a well known name, even when the food's not so good and more expensive.
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: indyfabz on April 22, 2013, 11:12:05 am
Several of you mention "local mom and pop diner" - What is that?

Small, locally owned and operated diners are often operated by the owners' family, thus known generically as "Mom and Pop Diner."  They know and are known by the locals, who often will go there for a regular cup of coffee, sometimes a breakfast, every morning.

In Darby, MT we had breakfast at Sandy's Silver Spoon or something like that. A couple of regular locals came in, went behind the counter and poured their own coffee so the lone waitress could see to the other customers.

Places like that are fun to visit. They are also good places to pick up intel, such a nicer roads to ride. You may even get a surprise. In a local diner in Poe, IN on the Northern Tier, a compadre and I ended up in a conversation with the former Mayor, who was an active farmer. We talked about our trip and he told us all bout the new volunteer fire house the town had built. He eventually went to work in the fields. When we asked for our check a short time later, the waitress told us he had paid for our breakfasts.
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: nomad on April 23, 2013, 07:54:45 pm
If you can set aside issues of flavor for a moment, consider combining starches, fats, and sugars in the highest densities possible and then using protein bars for protein.  This could be dry potato flakes mixed with olive oil, for example, and hydrated with a bit of water.  You could also try something like bringing cake or brownie mix, adding oil and water, and then just eating it with a spoon, that is of course unless you want to try to 'bake' it in a pan over a fire or something creative like that.  Quick-cook oatmeal is also dense complex carbs and rehydrates easily, even without heat.  Add trail mix to it or some other combination of nuts and dried fruit and/or other sugary garnish and add coconut oil to make it creamy and add very high-density fat calories.  These may not sound like the tastiest meals but if you're trying to pack a lot of calories with little weight and you're filtering water along the way, they'll work.  Most importantly, experiment with ratios of complex carbs, fats, and sugar that works for you.  I once tried living on mainly nuts and sunflower seeds as these have lots of calories and protein, but I found that I just can't get the energy from fats that I can from complex carbs.  This may be different for people depending on the ability of their livers to break down fats into simpler carbohydrates, though, idk.
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: edmilkman on May 16, 2013, 04:55:25 am
This is a really odd question because we don't really know your reason for wanting to try this without restaurant food !


One different thought comes to mind from my experience with through-hikering, walking along the Appalachian, Pacific Crest, or any other long hiking trail. "Thru-hiking" means that you are walking for a very long time on these trails without stopping except for a rest day no more than once a week. The mind-set of a thru-hiker tends to turn to nothing but walk, eat, sleep and then do it all again. The younger ones that are college age sometimes walk as long as they can until their money runs out.

So when the money gets tight and the appetite gets overpowering, they are famous for walking into a restaurant in the "trail towns", sitting down to order a cup of coffee, Coke, or some other small item. Then when nobody is looking, or maybe even if they are looking, walk over and grab a mostly intact plate left behind by somebody that just left !  This really works good if you are at a place that has a buffet table but lets you in to order off a menu like some KFC's and .......... can't think of that other restaurant at the moment................ ok, it's Shoney's

So if cost and the challenge of making the trip worth remembering are your goals,
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: Glamis Sand Dunes support on June 24, 2013, 09:32:29 pm
I am a host on the southern tier, fixing dinner and breakfast for my cyclists. I like to send them on their way with a small bag of quinoa flakes. Not the grains but flattened flakes. Quinoa is a grain, that is tiny but packed with complete protein. The flakes don't have to be cooked, just pour hot water over them and sit a minute or two. It can be served sweet as in dried berries and nuts or savory as in a few greens or spices. Great with dried coconut. Happy cycling and see you in Palo Verde!
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: staehpj1 on June 25, 2013, 06:54:41 am
If you can set aside issues of flavor for a moment, consider combining starches, fats, and sugars in the highest densities possible and then using protein bars for protein.  This could be dry potato flakes mixed with olive oil, for example, and hydrated with a bit of water.  You could also try something like bringing cake or brownie mix, adding oil and water, and then just eating it with a spoon, that is of course unless you want to try to 'bake' it in a pan over a fire or something creative like that.  Quick-cook oatmeal is also dense complex carbs and rehydrates easily, even without heat.  Add trail mix to it or some other combination of nuts and dried fruit and/or other sugary garnish and add coconut oil to make it creamy and add very high-density fat calories.  These may not sound like the tastiest meals but if you're trying to pack a lot of calories with little weight and you're filtering water along the way, they'll work.  Most importantly, experiment with ratios of complex carbs, fats, and sugar that works for you.  I once tried living on mainly nuts and sunflower seeds as these have lots of calories and protein, but I found that I just can't get the energy from fats that I can from complex carbs.  This may be different for people depending on the ability of their livers to break down fats into simpler carbohydrates, though, idk.

Just one opinion, but...
That might work, but it sounds awful to me.  I know that I get sick of the commercial bars like Cliff and power bars really quickly.  Plus I would hate to miss sampling local or regional food.  To ride the ST without eating Mexican food, barbecue, or Cajun food, riding across the middle of the Rural US and not trying the local biscuits and gravy, or riding through Maine without eating lobster would be a huge shame IMO.
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: Glamis Sand Dunes support on June 25, 2013, 12:47:06 pm
Regional Colorado River cuisine..........pan fried fresh catfish dusted with homemade curry powders!!!
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: indyfabz on June 25, 2013, 01:22:50 pm
riding across the middle of the Rural US and not trying the local biscuits and gravy, or riding through Maine without eating lobster would be a huge shame IMO.

+1. I had my first taste of chicken fried steak with biscuits and gravy half way through a century day from WA to ID. Near the end of the trip, we splurged for lobster in Camden, ME. A few years ago I could not spend a night in Butte without trying Pork Chop John's double poork chop sandwich, which made an infamous cameo appearence in the film "Ride the Divide." A huckleberry milk shake in western MT is a must in my book. I know money can be tight, but it is nice to sample some of the local fare.
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: lukethedrifter on June 29, 2013, 11:11:46 am
I ate a ton of peanut butter and apple or pb and honey sandwiches. Breakfast was easy. Boil water for coffee and grits/oats/whatever. Dinner was generally a one pot pasta or stew. Quick cooking legumes like lentils work great as well.

Why a mom-and-pop? Well, because you're traveling.
Title: Re: touring without "eating out"
Post by: Greg in MO on July 19, 2013, 03:38:02 pm
I agree that hitting local diners is one of the best parts of touring, but if you are looking for good recipes developed by cyclists (albeit competitive ones), check out:

http://feedzonecookbook.com/ (http://feedzonecookbook.com/)

The Feed Zone Portables book has excellent ideas for portable foods to essentially replace pre-packaged energy bars and the like with real food.  Might be tough to keep some of them going for 11 days, but you may be able to make some on the way.

Greg