Adventure Cycling Association Forum

Bicycle Travel => Gear Talk => Topic started by: Ty0604 on October 08, 2015, 05:55:38 pm

 
Title: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: Ty0604 on October 08, 2015, 05:55:38 pm
Interested in information regarding shoes/pedals for a cross country ride

Right now I have cages on my pedals. I've never used clips before. I've thought about keeping the cages and buying a comfortable pair of shoes. The only friend I know who has done a coast-to-coast trip had clips and said he'd rather had cages.

My budget is already fairly tight with everything else I've needed to purchase but can still spend no more than $200

I've looked at a bunch of options but would like first hand experiences please!

Thank you!
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: staehpj1 on October 08, 2015, 06:33:54 pm
Right now I have cages on my pedals. I've never used clips before. I've thought about keeping the cages and buying a comfortable pair of shoes
It sounds like you are confused about the terminology.  The cages that are attached to the pedals are called toe clips.  I think when you say clips, you mean clipless (clipless is the setup where there are cleats on the bottom of the shoes that click into the "clipless" pedals).

I personally wouldn't consider anything other than clipless (SPD in my case) and I like my Sidi Giau shoes, but that is what I am used to and like.

On the other hand people successfully use just about any shoe/pedal combination you can imagine, so use the setup you prefer.
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: Ty0604 on October 08, 2015, 06:43:33 pm
Sorry I guess I don't know the terminology. Why are they considered "clipless" when they clip into the pedals? That seems confusing. I'll take a look at the shoes you mentioned, thanks!
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: jsieber on October 08, 2015, 07:01:15 pm
Some more information about the history here: http://bicycles.stackexchange.com/questions/240/why-the-heck-are-cleated-shoes-called-clipless (http://bicycles.stackexchange.com/questions/240/why-the-heck-are-cleated-shoes-called-clipless)

Ultimately, it is a personal preference decision. Many people prefer flat pedals and comfortable shoes for touring. I'm with staehpj1 and really prefer clipless pedals as that is what I am used to, but there is definitely no right or wrong setup for bicycle touring.
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: Old Guy New Hobby on October 08, 2015, 07:02:13 pm
I also like SPD cleats. There are plenty of SPD shoes that recess the cleats so you can walk in them. I look for shoes with very stiff soles. The stiff soles spread the force from the pedals across a large area of your foot to prevent "hot spots". The shoes get the clips recessed by placing a border of rubber (or similar) around the edge of the sole. I look for shoes where the rubber is soft and grippy, so the shoes won't be slick if I walk into a store. There are plenty of SPD pedals and shoes, because they are frequently used by mountain bikers. You should be able to get decent pedals and shoes for less than $200.

Make sure you ride in these a good amount before starting your tour. You want your feet to acclimate to the shoes gradually.

When learning to learn how to ride with clipless shoes, there are two kinds of people -- those who have fallen over, and liars. ;) The problem is, you have to remember to clip out before stopping. Most people do OK when they first start. After a while, they think they've got it. Then they lose their focus, forget to clip out, and fall over as they stop. My fall happened next to a car of attractive young women. It hurt my pride. This is just another reason to ride your new shoes a good amount before starting your tour.
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: staehpj1 on October 08, 2015, 07:34:51 pm
Why are they considered "clipless" when they clip into the pedals? That seems confusing.

Yeah, it is kind of weird.
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: RussSeaton on October 09, 2015, 10:53:12 am
Why are they considered "clipless" when they clip into the pedals? That seems confusing.

The pedals are called "clipless" because they have no toe CLIPS to slide your shoe into.  Long ago bicycle racers used toe clips on the front of the pedals (steel, not plastic) and had cleats on the bottom of their racing shoes.  These cleats had a slot in them to slide over the back cage of the pedal.  Shoes had wooden soles so the cleat could be nailed onto the sole.  Plastic soles and screwed on cleats came along in the 70s and 80s.

Here are pictures of what toe clips and cleats used to look like.  These are modern plastic sole shoes with screwed on cleats.  At the bottom of the page is a picture of leather soled shoes and nailed on steel cleats.
http://www.yellowjersey.org/tocleat.html

Here are original racing shoes with wood soles and nailed on cleats.
https://www.pinterest.com/pin/314055773984550351/

And this is a picture of what people mean when they say toe clips today.  Plastic hoops on the front of the pedal, nylon straps, and sneakers.
http://www.bywayofbicycle.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/toe-clips.jpg

As for shoes and pedals to use on a cross country ride, get some SPD sandals.  Shimano makes good sandals.  And some cheap SPD pedals.  Shimano makes some cheap models for about $30 from Nashbar.com  You're all set.
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: Ty0604 on October 09, 2015, 11:43:06 am
Thanks everyone for the suggestions and the history! I'll take a look when I get back on Sunday from a camping trip I'm about to leave on. I'm 23 and fairly new to road biking but I do have experience with long distance biking including a Seattle to San Diego run a few years ago, on a hybrid bike with regular plastic pedals but I was 18 and didn't know better. All I remember is the ball of my foot throbbing nonstop about the time I hit the Washington/Oregon border.
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: DaveB on October 09, 2015, 09:01:33 pm
Another vote for "clipless" pedals.  Try them and you will never go back to clips and straps.
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: Old Guy New Hobby on October 10, 2015, 07:15:44 am
Quote
All I remember is the ball of my foot throbbing nonstop about the time I hit the Washington/Oregon border.

Yeah. That's "hot spots".
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: Westinghouse on October 10, 2015, 05:52:31 pm
I have not used them myself, but from all the reviews I have read, I would strongly suggest that you use those clip-in shoes and pedals. Everybody said they could definitely feel the difference in increased pedaling efficiency. Experience is not the best teacher. It is the only teacher.
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: Ty0604 on October 13, 2015, 05:11:35 pm
Quote
As for shoes and pedals to use on a cross country ride, get some SPD sandals.  Shimano makes good sandals.  And some cheap SPD pedals.  Shimano makes some cheap models for about $30 from Nashbar.com  You're all set.

The cheapest ones I saw were around $80 for the shoes alone on Nashbar.

I ended up purchasing some Venzo Shimano shoes with the pedals etc on Ebay for $75 + free shipping. Good reviews across several websites. 
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: Old Guy New Hobby on October 14, 2015, 08:08:42 am
Good for you. Good luck on your ride. Let us know how it turns out.
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: RussSeaton on October 14, 2015, 11:28:17 am
Quote
As for shoes and pedals to use on a cross country ride, get some SPD sandals.  Shimano makes good sandals.  And some cheap SPD pedals.  Shimano makes some cheap models for about $30 from Nashbar.com  You're all set.

The cheapest ones I saw were around $80 for the shoes alone on Nashbar.

I ended up purchasing some Venzo Shimano shoes with the pedals etc on Ebay for $75 + free shipping. Good reviews across several websites.

http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_197367_-1___204720
Shimano SPD pedals from Nashbar for $26.

http://www.amazon.com/Shimano-Cycling-Sandals-Black-All-Sizes/dp/B002MGBIO2
Shimano sandals for $75.

http://www.amazon.com/Venzo-Mountain-Bicycle-Cycling-Shimano/dp/B00APA92X6
Your Shimano Venzo mountain bike shoes and Wellgo SPD pedals for $75 on Amazon with free shipping.  Shoes are probably good although not quite as comfortable as Shimano sandals.  Hopefully the Wellgo pedals will make it through your trip without too many problems.  Then you can replace them with Shimano pedals.
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: Ty0604 on October 14, 2015, 04:01:13 pm
Quote
Your Shimano Venzo mountain bike shoes and Wellgo SPD pedals for $75 on Amazon with free shipping.  Shoes are probably good although not quite as comfortable as Shimano sandals.  Hopefully the Wellgo pedals will make it through your trip without too many problems.  Then you can replace them with Shimano pedals.

I ordered from Ebay, not Amazon, and they came with Shimano pedals, not Wellgo. Haven't heard of that brand. Those are the same shoes though.
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: Ty0604 on October 14, 2015, 04:06:52 pm
Good for you. Good luck on your ride. Let us know how it turns out.

Thanks, will do! I leave in mid April. Spent a few days roughly planning on my route. I decided against using any of the route maps on here and wanted the adventure of planning my own route based on a few books I've read. I say "roughly" because I've pinpointed cities along the way in terms of being 60-100 miles apart where I can stop if I'm tired or keep riding to the next city if I'm feeling fine. The route covers 4,249.9 miles and travels through at least 22 states. Not all of which I have to pass through but am taking some detours along the way. i.e. I'll be within a 100 miles of Yellowstone and the Grand Tetons so heading south to Wyoming there and also have friends in several "out of the way" places that I've purposely routed my trip through to stay with them.

I'll have a blog for my ride and when it's set up I'll post the link on here so any of you who'd like can follow me along the ride. I'll be updating it as service allows me to do so!
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: Old Guy New Hobby on October 15, 2015, 04:11:32 pm
Look at CrazyGuyOnABike.com. He did most of the work for you.
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: staehpj1 on October 15, 2015, 04:20:38 pm
Look at CrazyGuyOnABike.com. He did most of the work for you.

If you want other bike tourists to see your journal that is a good place to post it.
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: Ty0604 on October 15, 2015, 11:17:05 pm
Thanks for the link but the organization I'm doing my ride for (StandUp2Cancer) has a blog directly on the page where people will be going to make their donations. I might, however, use the above link and do two of them. Easy enough to copy and paste! Or at least post the link to my blog on the above website.

Much appreciated :)
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: staehpj1 on October 16, 2015, 07:33:32 am
Or at least post the link to my blog on the above website.

Be careful how you do that.  Creating an essentially empty journal that is just a link to one elsewhere is against their rules and definitely frowned on.  Posting about your trip on their forum and including a link is probably fine.
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: Ty0604 on October 16, 2015, 03:35:29 pm
Or at least post the link to my blog on the above website.

Be careful how you do that.  Creating an essentially empty journal that is just a link to one elsewhere is against their rules and definitely frowned on.  Posting about your trip on their forum and including a link is probably fine.

Thanks for the information. I'll just copy and paste what I post on my main blog to the above blog as to not break any of their rules.
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: gpshay on October 23, 2015, 04:42:15 pm
I just finished a ride from San Diego to Phx Az. I used clipless shimano touring shoes with a walkable rubber sole .. There were some spots that I had to push my bIke up hills .. Even though the shoe cleats are recessed in the sole they still came in contact with the roadway and you could hear and feel the grinding of the small pebbles against the metal cleats .. Hearing and feeling that gave cause to the thought ..was I damaging the cleat and thus creating a potential problem .. The other "Con" I found was while in granny gear stopped on a busy road with heavy traffic (semi's included) companied with a significant grade and narrow shoulder "Clicking" back into the pedal was precarious and down right dangerous at times .. I have since re evaluated my pedal choice and have switched over to Blackspire flat pedals which I think will  alleviate those issues .. I should mention that I have always cycled with clip or clipless pedals ..but for touring I think I,m making a change ..Glenn



Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: Ty0604 on November 01, 2015, 09:03:03 pm
I just finished a ride from San Diego to Phx Az. I used clipless shimano touring shoes with a walkable rubber sole .. There were some spots that I had to push my bIke up hills .. Even though the shoe cleats are recessed in the sole they still came in contact with the roadway and you could hear and feel the grinding of the small pebbles against the metal cleats .. Hearing and feeling that gave cause to the thought ..was I damaging the cleat and thus creating a potential problem .. The other "Con" I found was while in granny gear stopped on a busy road with heavy traffic (semi's included) companied with a significant grade and narrow shoulder "Clicking" back into the pedal was precarious and down right dangerous at times .. I have since re evaluated my pedal choice and have switched over to Blackspire flat pedals which I think will  alleviate those issues .. I should mention that I have always cycled with clip or clipless pedals ..but for touring I think I,m making a change ..Glenn

Thanks for the information. I'm going to try them and worst case scenario is I'll ditch them along the way and switch.
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: Pat Lamb on November 02, 2015, 08:24:53 am
The other "Con" I found was while in granny gear stopped on a busy road with heavy traffic (semi's included) companied with a significant grade and narrow shoulder "Clicking" back into the pedal was precarious and down right dangerous at times .. I have since re evaluated my pedal choice and have switched over to Blackspire flat pedals which I think will  alleviate those issues.

Getting re-started with a load in granny gear is a challenge.  It's hard to get and keep enough momentum to ride a straight line, because you lose momentum quickly when there's a lull in your pedal stroke (as there is near the bottom of every stroke), and because you're geared down so far one kick doesn't get you much speed.

On the really steep stuff (>10-15%) it's usually easier for me to walk the bike until the grade eases.  On back roads it's sometimes possible to wait for a gap in traffic (OK, on back roads there's usually not much traffic!) and "tack" up the hill.  Other than that, my best efforts involve clicking one pedal in, push/pedal to kick off, and then forget about clicking the other pedal in.  Just put your foot on that other pedal and pedal normally until you get some speed, or a break in the grade, where you can click the last foot in.  Often it'll click in after a few strokes without your conscious intent!  Once you become proficient with this technique, the only benefit to a platform pedal is getting off the pedal with less drama -- but if you've got spikes keeping your foot on the pedal, all bets are off there.

Glenn, I wish you luck with your spiked platform pedals.  I'm afraid you're going to need it!
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: DaveB on November 02, 2015, 10:16:17 am
Glenn, I wish you luck with your spiked platform pedals.  I'm afraid you're going to need it!
I agree.  I further suggest you ride a fair amount with these new pedals before committing to use them on a tour.  I expect they will not be the as wonderful as you think.
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: staehpj1 on November 02, 2015, 10:55:15 am
Not trying to talk you out of switching if you want to, but...

Even though the shoe cleats are recessed in the sole they still came in contact with the roadway and you could hear and feel the grinding of the small pebbles against the metal cleats .. Hearing and feeling that gave cause to the thought ..was I damaging the cleat and thus creating a potential problem ..
FWIW, I have listened to and felt that grinding too, but the cleats still last a very long time, maybe as long as the shoes do depending on how much you walk and on what kind of surfaces.  Even when my knee was acting up and I was walking a lot they still held up pretty well.  So for me at least it is more of a theoretical problem than an actual one.

The other "Con" I found was while in granny gear stopped on a busy road with heavy traffic (semi's included) companied with a significant grade and narrow shoulder "Clicking" back into the pedal was precarious and down right dangerous at times .. I have since re evaluated my pedal choice and have switched over to Blackspire flat pedals which I think will  alleviate those issues .. I should mention that I have always cycled with clip or clipless pedals ..but for touring I think I,m making a change ..
It isn't that hard to pedal long enough to get going without bothering to clip in and then clip in at your leisure.  So again for me at least more of a theoretical problem than an actual one.

You may not, but I'd definitely miss being clipped in, probably even more so on tour where I will usually be riding every day for weeks or months.
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: walks.in2.trees on November 03, 2015, 12:31:59 pm
I also like SPD cleats. There are plenty of SPD shoes that recess the cleats so you can walk in them. I look for shoes with very stiff soles. The stiff soles spread the force from the pedals across a large area of your foot to prevent "hot spots". The shoes get the clips recessed by placing a border of rubber (or similar) around the edge of the sole. I look for shoes where the rubber is soft and grippy, so the shoes won't be slick if I walk into a store. There are plenty of SPD pedals and shoes, because they are frequently used by mountain bikers. You should be able to get decent pedals and shoes for less than $200.

Make sure you ride in these a good amount before starting your tour. You want your feet to acclimate to the shoes gradually.

When learning to learn how to ride with clipless shoes, there are two kinds of people -- those who have fallen over, and liars. ;) The problem is, you have to remember to clip out before stopping. Most people do OK when they first start. After a while, they think they've got it. Then they lose their focus, forget to clip out, and fall over as they stop. My fall happened next to a car of attractive young women. It hurt my pride. This is just another reason to ride your new shoes a good amount before starting your tour.
Ha-ha I did pretty much the same thing. When trying it out the first time, I was warned, so I practiced a bit clipping in and out. But its different when you actually ride, so I still fell over :D

I always take one foot out, sometimes both well before I have to stop. It'll be the emergency stops that get me I think. My shoes are good for walking a little, but I can't wear them to work, I have to bring shoes for being on my feet all day.

Tip: get pedals that are SPD on one side and normal on the other, I got them on a whim, but if you're riding through a city, stoplight to stoplight, clipping in is impractical and probably dangerous. I flip my right pedal over so I can't clip in by accident. Also always use the same foot to stop with, or you'll confuse yourself and fall over

Sent from my SGP561 using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: walks.in2.trees on November 03, 2015, 12:41:53 pm
I just finished a ride from San Diego to Phx Az. I used clipless shimano touring shoes with a walkable rubber sole .. There were some spots that I had to push my bIke up hills .. Even though the shoe cleats are recessed in the sole they still came in contact with the roadway and you could hear and feel the grinding of the small pebbles against the metal cleats .. Hearing and feeling that gave cause to the thought ..was I damaging the cleat and thus creating a potential problem .. The other "Con" I found was while in granny gear stopped on a busy road with heavy traffic (semi's included) companied with a significant grade and narrow shoulder "Clicking" back into the pedal was precarious and down right dangerous at times .. I have since re evaluated my pedal choice and have switched over to Blackspire flat pedals which I think will  alleviate those issues .. I should mention that I have always cycled with clip or clipless pedals ..but for touring I think I,m making a change ..Glenn
I use SPD "City" pedals which are not two sided. Flip it over so you don't clip in by accident for situations like this

Sent from my SGP561 using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: heflinkw on November 03, 2015, 04:31:56 pm
I love SPD for off road. I haven't done a long tour yet, but my touring/commuting bike is set up with MKS Lambda pedals and I wear any shoes I want from Chacos to hiking boots. When I do go touring I plan to take the Chacos and some type of light weight hiker or trail runner. IMHO clips or SPD are unnecessary for on road touring.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: DaveB on November 03, 2015, 04:39:40 pm
IMHO clips or SPD are unnecessary for on road touring.
Perhaps they are unnecessary for you.  Many of us disagree

Quote
My shoes are good for walking a little, but I can't wear them to work, I have to bring shoes for being on my feet all day.
Why not just leave a pair of suitable shoes at work.  That way you don't have to carry them back and forth each day.
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: heflinkw on November 03, 2015, 04:48:51 pm
Sorry, I'm not debating, that's why I stated it as opinion. Just trying to provide info for the OP. If you have limited funds it doesn't get much cheaper than flats and shoes you already own.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: heflinkw on November 03, 2015, 05:21:10 pm
The following article was enlightening for me.

https://www.rivbike.com/kb_results.asp?ID=45


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: Ty0604 on November 03, 2015, 05:46:52 pm
Sorry, I'm not debating, that's why I stated it as opinion. Just trying to provide info for the OP. If you have limited funds it doesn't get much cheaper than flats and shoes you already own.

Funds aren't really an issue any longer since my first post due to a number of reasons but I'm trying to spend as little as possible. I have a budget and anything left from that budget will go to the cancer foundation that I am doing my ride for. $75 for shoes and pedals was a good deal.

I'm going to bring a super light pair of walking shoes with me. I packed my panniers a few days ago as a test and I had a lot more room than expected and they were much lighter than I thought.

April 30 is the big day!
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: DaveB on November 04, 2015, 10:58:12 am
The following article was enlightening for me.

https://www.rivbike.com/kb_results.asp?ID=45
As usual, the Rivendell article sets up a "straw man" to argue their point.  I agree that extremely rigid, slippery soled road shoes with fully exposed cleats are not needed, or even desirable, for casual, fitness or touring riders but the alternative doesn't have to be floppy, soft soled shoes and flat pedals.  "MTB" shoes with walkable, reasonably rigid soles and recessed cleats combined with suitable MTB-type pedals provide the security and control of clipless pedals while still allowing reasonable off-bike use.
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: Pat Lamb on November 04, 2015, 11:30:37 am
I can only remember one cross-country tourist I've met who was riding with road bike pedals.  There may be some on a supported tour (thinking Bubba's or PacTour) for whom the extra efficiency is significant.  But everybody else I've met on a long tour was using MTB pedals.  Even on shorter, supported tours I've ridden most riders go with MTB pedals so they can walk in the shoes.  Maybe 10%, probably less, on these shorter tours ride platform pedals.

For some reason it tickles me to see a little old lady, or a little old man, walking into a convenience store or ice cream parlor wearing Sidis...
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: Old Guy New Hobby on November 04, 2015, 12:34:36 pm
Code: [Select]
I have a budget and anything left from that budget will go to the cancer foundation
Let us know your URL. I know a young man who did a similar ride from East to West. It was an amazing adventure for him. Good luck!
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: Ty0604 on November 04, 2015, 09:10:41 pm
Code: [Select]
I have a budget and anything left from that budget will go to the cancer foundation
Let us know your URL. I know a young man who did a similar ride from East to West. It was an amazing adventure for him. Good luck!

I'll be sure to post it! The website is up now but it wont be public until January at the earliest. How long did your friend take to do it? I would love to talk to him if he has the time! Would you be willing to ask?

I'm really excited. My parents did so much for me and this is the least I could do in their memory. And I get to see the country at the same time! It's perfect timing too. I'm 23 and the lease is up at my condo and my contract is up at work in April so I have no commitments following April. Renting a storage unit and that'll be that!
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: Ty0604 on November 04, 2015, 09:15:49 pm
I've recently tried the clipless pedals and I'm not a fan honestly. I'm seriously considering going back to the cages I have and touring with those. I can return the shoes/pedals for a full refund still. One less item to carry. Can someone recommend a good shoe that would work for touring and could be worn to walk around in as well? Looking for a more specific answer than "any sneaker will do" etc  :P
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: John Nelson on November 04, 2015, 11:13:00 pm
You're talking about making tradeoffs. The stiffer the sole, the better for cycling. A sturdy shoe can be good for walking too. I knew I guy who toured in work boots. That's not such a bad idea, although a bit heavy for some.
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: Ty0604 on November 05, 2015, 01:34:33 am
You're talking about making tradeoffs. The stiffer the sole, the better for cycling. A sturdy shoe can be good for walking too. I knew I guy who toured in work boots. That's not such a bad idea, although a bit heavy for some.

Yeah too heavy. I'm going light. 12lb bike and ~20lbs of gear. I will have a pair of slip on shoes for walking in the very least. They're not suitable for riding but they weigh next to nothing.
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: heflinkw on November 05, 2015, 11:28:42 am
Keen Targhee II. Toe box is big.  May not work great with cages. See my previous on cages and cleats. They are waterproof which is a good thing.

http://m.zappos.com/keen-targhee-ii-magnet-brindle


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: heflinkw on November 05, 2015, 11:34:55 am
I've seen that some people tour with these as an alternative to clips or cages.

http://www.powergrips.com/


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: Ty0604 on November 05, 2015, 03:49:23 pm
Keen Targhee II. Toe box is big.  May not work great with cages. See my previous on cages and cleats. They are waterproof which is a good thing.

http://m.zappos.com/keen-targhee-ii-magnet-brindle


Thanks, I'll take a look. I have waterproof booties so doesn't matter if the shoes themselves are waterproof.
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: Ty0604 on November 05, 2015, 03:51:20 pm
Keen Targhee II. Toe box is big.  May not work great with cages. See my previous on cages and cleats. They are waterproof which is a good thing.

http://m.zappos.com/keen-targhee-ii-magnet-brindle


Keen is based here in Portland where I live so I can go to their warehouse and get the same shoes for around $75. Think I'll take a trip there in the next few weeks.
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: CanvasAndSteel on November 13, 2015, 07:51:40 am
The following article was enlightening for me.

https://www.rivbike.com/kb_results.asp?ID=45
As usual, the Rivendell article sets up a "straw man" to argue their point.  I agree that extremely rigid, slippery soled road shoes with fully exposed cleats are not needed, or even desirable, for casual, fitness or touring riders but the alternative doesn't have to be floppy, soft soled shoes and flat pedals.  "MTB" shoes with walkable, reasonably rigid soles and recessed cleats combined with suitable MTB-type pedals provide the security and control of clipless pedals while still allowing reasonable off-bike use.
You set up another straw man, as not all non cleated cycling shoes are floppy. I'm quite happy with 5 10s and pinned pedals. With that combination there's no need for cages for keeping a comfortable and efficient cadence between 98-102.

Sent from my 0PJA2 using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: RussSeaton on November 13, 2015, 10:14:01 am
I'm quite happy with 5 10s and pinned pedals. With that combination there's no need for cages for keeping a comfortable and efficient cadence between 98-102.

Reckon I would have to see that to believe it.  100 rpm is somewhat fast.  Every 6 tenths of a second, your leg makes a full rotation on the pedals.  Start your foot at 12 o'clock and pedal it around to the same 12 o'clock position in 6 tenths of a second.  Pedaling 100 rpm on loose pedals is possible for a second or two, no problem.  But pedaling 100 rpm on loose pedals for minutes or hours on end, ???  In ancient times the racers used toeclips and straps for the advantage of pulling back and up while pedaling.  But the clips and straps also kept their feet attached to the pedals when they pedaled at high rpms.  Pedaling at high rpm and having your feet fly off the pedals is not something you want to happen in a close group of bikes on a road.
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: Ty0604 on November 13, 2015, 01:42:51 pm
I found some 2014 Pearl Izumi's at REI's warehouse in Seattle for $48 ($110 retail) because they were "last years model."

Any one own these? I bought them without doing research just due to the cost and being in rush. Wasn't what I was there for. At that price I didn't see the harm in trying them.
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: RussSeaton on November 13, 2015, 03:36:00 pm
I found some 2014 Pearl Izumi's at REI's warehouse in Seattle for $48 ($110 retail) because they were "last years model."

You might want to be a bit more specific.  Pearl Izumi makes a wide assortment of shoes and clothing for bicycling.  I have shoes, shorts, tights, jerseys, and gloves made by Pearl Izumi.  I could almost do a commercial for Pearl Izumi advertising their cycling clothes.  Making the assumption you are talking about Pearl Izumi shoes, you might mention which exact model you bought.
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: Ty0604 on November 14, 2015, 12:36:00 am
I found some 2014 Pearl Izumi's at REI's warehouse in Seattle for $48 ($110 retail) because they were "last years model."

You might want to be a bit more specific.  Pearl Izumi makes a wide assortment of shoes and clothing for bicycling.  I have shoes, shorts, tights, jerseys, and gloves made by Pearl Izumi.  I could almost do a commercial for Pearl Izumi advertising their cycling clothes.  Making the assumption you are talking about Pearl Izumi shoes, you might mention which exact model you bought.

Considering this is a post about shoes your assumption would be correct. I bought X-Road Fuel II but that's irrelevant. Was asking about the brand in general.
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: CanvasAndSteel on November 14, 2015, 08:39:05 am
I'm quite happy with 5 10s and pinned pedals. With that combination there's no need for cages for keeping a comfortable and efficient cadence between 98-102.

Reckon I would have to see that to believe it.  100 rpm is somewhat fast.  Every 6 tenths of a second, your leg makes a full rotation on the pedals.  Start your foot at 12 o'clock and pedal it around to the same 12 o'clock position in 6 tenths of a second.  Pedaling 100 rpm on loose pedals is possible for a second or two, no problem.  But pedaling 100 rpm on loose pedals for minutes or hours on end, ???  In ancient times the racers used toeclips and straps for the advantage of pulling back and up while pedaling.  But the clips and straps also kept their feet attached to the pedals when they pedaled at high rpms.  Pedaling at high rpm and having your feet fly off the pedals is not something you want to happen in a close group of bikes on a road.
Yep, I remember the ancient times. My cycling experience goes back only to the early 80s, but at that time cages and straps were a must. The slotted cleats on my leather racing shoes had to be put in place and then belted down so as not to pop off. My canvas touring shoes had a hard rubber sole with little dimples and would slide off the pedals if not caged and strapped.

Very few people actually lift on a pedal stroke, as the force of the stroke is typically transferred from foot to foot before any lifting is done. The only time I lift is on climbs and sprints.  So it's quite possible to maintain a good quick cadence (100-105) with soft soled cycling  shoes on pinned pedals.  My guess is you haven't tried it so you're making assumptions instead of speaking from experience.

I rode nothing but cleats up to a couple years ago. I now have them only on my racer. I have Shimano Saints on my MTB, my touring bike, and my fat bike. My commuter has MKS Lambda (which are not technically pinned, but have little raised "cones" for purchase with the pedals). Cycle specific soft soled shoes with pinned pedals sans cages and straps are a viable option that will allow almost all riders to maintain the cadence they are used to with clipless systems.

Sent from my 0PJA2 using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: CanvasAndSteel on November 14, 2015, 08:50:48 am
Just to be clear, I'm in no way saying everyone should get rid of their clipless pedals and go with platform. I'm just saying its a viable option that for touring can actually simplify the how many shoes? conundrum.

Sent from my 0PJA2 using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: Pat Lamb on November 14, 2015, 02:41:42 pm
Just to be clear, I'm in no way saying everyone should get rid of their clipless pedals and go with platform. I'm just saying its a viable option that for touring can actually simplify the how many shoes? conundrum.

Two pairs of shoes (well, one pair of shoes and a pair of sandals) has been enough for all my tours.  It's really nice to be able to take off wet shoes after a day of riding in the rain.

And Russ is right -- feet flying off pedals is not good when riding with a group.  More than that, it can be particularly painful for a male rider any time!
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: RussSeaton on November 14, 2015, 02:49:18 pm
Considering this is a post about shoes your assumption would be correct. I bought X-Road Fuel II but that's irrelevant. Was asking about the brand in general.

The title of this thread is "Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?"  And you consider it irrelevant to mention the model of your Pearl Izumi shoes?  Hmmm.

Pearl Izumi is a fine brand.  Its a slightly premium brand.  Some brands are much more premium.  Many other names are less.  Pearl Izumi is at least average or better on most or all of the things they make.  Can't go too wrong if you choose Pearl Izumi.  It costs more than the lesser names.  But is not quite as expensive as the extreme premium names.
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: CanvasAndSteel on November 14, 2015, 03:10:09 pm
Just to be clear, I'm in no way saying everyone should get rid of their clipless pedals and go with platform. I'm just saying its a viable option that for touring can actually simplify the how many shoes? conundrum.

Two pairs of shoes (well, one pair of shoes and a pair of sandals) has been enough for all my tours.  It's really nice to be able to take off wet shoes after a day of riding in the rain.

And Russ is right -- feet flying off pedals is not good when riding with a group.  More than that, it can be particularly painful for a male rider any time!
Absolutely, re having dry shoes to change into.  But in about two years of riding platforms almost daily--including singletrack--I've had me feet come off the pedals once. A little technique goes a long way.

Sent from my 0PJA2 using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: Ty0604 on November 14, 2015, 03:12:38 pm
Considering this is a post about shoes your assumption would be correct. I bought X-Road Fuel II but that's irrelevant. Was asking about the brand in general.

The title of this thread is "Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?"  And you consider it irrelevant to mention the model of your Pearl Izumi shoes?  Hmmm.

Pearl Izumi is a fine brand.  Its a slightly premium brand.  Some brands are much more premium.  Many other names are less.  Pearl Izumi is at least average or better on most or all of the things they make.  Can't go too wrong if you choose Pearl Izumi.  It costs more than the lesser names.  But is not quite as expensive as the extreme premium names.

My question wasn't about the model of the shoes but about the brand itself. Sorry for the confusion. I had never heard of the brand before getting the shoes.

I'll be happy if they make it through my ~5,000 mile trip. For $54 I wouldn't care if I had to throw them away when I got done with my trip. Sounds like it was a good purchase.
Title: Re: Shoes/pedals for a cross country ride?
Post by: Ty0604 on November 14, 2015, 03:14:30 pm
Just to be clear, I'm in no way saying everyone should get rid of their clipless pedals and go with platform. I'm just saying its a viable option that for touring can actually simplify the how many shoes? conundrum.

Two pairs of shoes (well, one pair of shoes and a pair of sandals) has been enough for all my tours.  It's really nice to be able to take off wet shoes after a day of riding in the rain.

And Russ is right -- feet flying off pedals is not good when riding with a group.  More than that, it can be particularly painful for a male rider any time!
Absolutely, re having dry shoes to change into.  But in about two years of riding platforms almost daily--including singletrack--I've had me feet come off the pedals once. A little technique goes a long way.

That happened to me once before I got cages. Not only did I slam my parts down on the seat but the pedal tore my leg up pretty bad when it slipped off.