Adventure Cycling Association Forum

Bicycle Travel => General Discussion => Topic started by: Melarch on March 06, 2020, 03:30:04 am

 
Title: Security - locking your bike
Post by: Melarch on March 06, 2020, 03:30:04 am
A question- I live in Denver and I must use at least two locks or my bike gets stolen(have lost a few!) is it this bad when touring or just in larger cities. Don't really want to carry 5 to 6 lbs of locks when touring but I guess it might not be an option.
Thanks in advance for any insight
Mel
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: bobbys beard on March 06, 2020, 03:44:34 am
I only carried a flimsy combination lock for 5 months of touring and never had a problem. I often didn’t lock it at all and happily left it outside supermarkets etc. I did keep a close eye on it in certain areas and I know others have lost their bikes on tour, so perhaps I had some luck. I also had a rucksack with my valuables that I never left attached to the bike unless I was riding.

I do think there is something about a loaded touring bike that gains more respect. Or perhaps it’s just harder to steal with all the luggage...
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: John Nelson on March 06, 2020, 08:12:24 am
I believe that the risk is much lower outside larger cities, but I don’t have any data to support that belief. I only carry a small, lightweight lock, but I take the bike inside when possible, and try to keep it in view if I can (which is not always possible).

There’s always risk.
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: John Nettles on March 06, 2020, 09:43:38 am
Melarch,

First welcome to the ACA Forums.  Like the others, I use what I call a "deterrent" lock which is basically a 15' length of coated 1/8" wire locked with a more heavy duty (LOL) luggage lock (a local hardware store like ACE or True Value will make one for you probably).  If in small towns (under 3k people), I never lock but like others try to keep an eye on it or ask someone to if they can.  In larger towns (20+k) I always lock unless if just going into a CS.  However, while I tour, I am rarely in a larger town.  If going into a big city, i.e. Washington DC, then I just ride into town, check in at the hotel, and just use public transportation to get around.  Maybe I am jinxing it but in 40+ years of touring, I have not had anything stolen.

Obviously, if you are going solo, it is a bit tougher than if in a group, then someone can stay outside while the others shop, shower, etc.  Plus in a group, if you wrap the cable through a lot of the bikes, they can't just pick up the bikes and haul off, at least not easily.

Tailwinds, John
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: BikeliciousBabe on March 06, 2020, 12:41:50 pm
And remember that a U-lock can be useless in some campgrounds as there might not be things it will fit around.

And sometimes you have to get inventive if you feel there is an appreciable risk. Last year I stayed in a town park in a small town in Montana. I was totally visible from the street.  That made me a little uneasy. Before turning in I took my 6' cable combo lock and threaded it through the handles of all four pannier and then around the bike and made a pile out of it all. No one was going to walk away with something without an effort that would have likely woken me up.
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: David W Pratt on March 08, 2020, 09:59:59 am
Ironically, the problem seems to be worst in "bike friendly" cities.  The friendliness seems to foster a market for stolen bikes.  Last summer I stopped for dinner in Schenectady while doing the Erie Canal Towpath.  When I came out of the diner, my lock would not unlock.  Fortunately, I was able to break it with a stiff pull; which landed me on my fanny.  Nobody commented on someone apparently stealing a bike
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: Westinghouse on March 12, 2020, 07:38:22 pm
I always used the least expensive, lightest locks available, $1.00 locks from Dollar Tree store. It protects only from a grab and go theft that can happen in a few seconds. Any cable cutter for brake cables can cut through it in one second. In restaurants I sit where the bike is visible through a window, and keep it locked against a sudden run up and go theft. I would not leave it locked anywhere out of sight for a long time. I stealth camp, and still lock it at night, though the likelihood that Scudgemoe might track me to my spot in the woods to purloin my ride is about zero. I read a story about a cyclist who camped in a wooded area one night. He got out of his tent in the morning. All his gear, bike too, was gone. A manager of a Wendy's restaurant in Phoenix, Arizona told me this story. A guy on a bicycle pulled up. He leaned his bike against the wall outside. He went inside to get something to eat and drink. Sure, there were large windows. The guy had a good view of his bike. Very quickly a man ran up to the bike, mounted, and took off like a bat out of hell. By the time the cyclist was on his feet and out the door, Scudgemoe was half way down the block. The manager told me he did not know the outcome after that, but the thief did get away with the bike. If you ride an expensive bicycle, always lock it wherever and whenever. Some bicycle thieves know what to look for in bicycles. A high end touring bike or any other type is what they look for. And beside that. A lock is good for one thing, and that is to keep an honest man honest.

Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: froze on March 23, 2020, 10:53:20 am
You probably know by now that in todays modern world of battery powered tools there is a tool called the angle grinder that when fitted with specific type of blade and that blade is new it can cut through ANY lock in under 30 seconds, so the reality is no lock is safe.

However when you are touring you are usually not that far away from the bike, so all you need is fairly tough lock, but not extremely tough, like a 7 foot long 12 mm thick security cable, you don't want a cable so thin that they could cut it with cheap pocket knife, these cost around $15; with a combination lock (because you don't want to lose the key while touring), like the Master 178D set your own combo lock, these cost about $10.  The cable is flexible so you can loop it in a circle for storage in the pannier, I twist the ends in such a way that I can attach the lock and not have the loop come unlooped; the cable is also obviously flexible enough to go around anything like a park table leg.

Don't go for those cable locks with the built in long style round combo locks, I'm not a remotely a professional thief or a locksmith, but I can open those up in about 30 seconds without tools!  While the lock I suggested in the above paragraph is not that stout keep in mind the cable is less so, so you don't need a real stout lock, plus the stouter the lock is the more it weighs.

So the combined weight of the cable and the lock is just under 2 pounds.

Also any campground that I've ever been at is very safe, I see people with their bikes standing outside next to their tents or trailers all night long with no locks! and I've never heard of a story of a bike getting stolen, but I'm not that trustworthy of others so I lock my bike to be safe.  If you're going with a tour group it's even less likely your bike would be stolen, but again it's wise to be a bit prudent, and the lock I suggest just keeps the rare opportunist from just riding off with your bike in a second. 


https://www.amazon.com/Lumintrail-Heavy-Duty-Security-Coated-Braided/dp/B072B9FPL3/ref=sr_1_24?dchild=1&keywords=thick+bike+lock&qid=1584973321&sr=8-24

https://www.gearhungry.com/best-combination-lock/

0000000000000000000000000000000000
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: staehpj1 on March 24, 2020, 05:40:32 am
I use a very light very cheap lock and don't lock all that often.  I take great care in some places and not so much in others.

There are places that I just won't leave my bike unattended at all. Other times I keep it in my sight when I can.  I have been known to wheel my bike up and down the aisles in a grocery or walmart or park it up front inside by the registers and ask if someone would keep an eye on it.

I tend to be in tiny rural towns most of the time.  In bigger towns or cities I get more careful.  In "bike friendly" towns especially so since there are likely to be plenty of nice bikes and a market for them there and therefore bike thieves.

I figure that it helps me not worry that I ride a bike and own equipment that I can afford to replace if it should ever go missing.  On a long trip the trip would be delayed, but not ended if everything were stolen.  I figure the odds are pretty good that won't ever happen, but I understand that it is a possibility that I have to live with.
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: BikeliciousBabe on March 24, 2020, 11:57:50 am
I use a very light very cheap lock and don't lock all that often.  I take great care in some places and not so much in others.

There are places that I just won't leave my bike unattended at all. Other times I keep it in my sight when I can.  I have been known to wheel my bike up and down the aisles in a grocery or walmart or park it up front inside by the registers and ask if someone would keep an eye on it.

I tend to be in tiny rural towns most of the time.  In bigger towns or cities I get more careful.  In "bike friendly" towns especially so since there are likely to be plenty of nice bikes and a market for them there and therefore bike thieves.

I figure that it helps me not worry that I ride a bike and own equipment that I can afford to replace if it should ever go missing.  On a long trip the trip would be delayed, but not ended if everything were stolen.  I figure the odds are pretty good that won't ever happen, but I understand that it is a possibility that I have to live with.

+1.
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: froze on May 05, 2020, 11:21:21 am
If protecting your bike is a huge concern for you, and you don't have much trust in the locks, then get a bicycle personal articles policy (also known as a floater) from your homeowners policy, not only will a bike be covered for theft but also accidents, and there is no deductible.  You would have to check with your insurance company but mine is State Farm and they cover my bikes for full replacement value not depreciated and not stated value and not appraised value; the cost for two of my bikes that total to $5,000 is $125 for the year.

Theft warranties you see on locks are worthless!  in order to get a claim approved you have to jump through a lot of hoops which means you have to read the fine print on the box the lock comes with, and even then they don't tell you some things so you have find out more on their website, all in attempt not to pay a claim, and lock companies rarely pay out a claim for someones bike that was stolen, the most you will get is a new lock!  I know Krypt. lock requires that you send them the original receipt, but at the time of loss you have to send them the original receipt?  Huh? so you need to make sure that the place you bought it from prints out two original receipts because they won't accept a copy.  You also have to register the lock, you have to keep the original packaging, you have to make sure you pay for renewing the coverage, but after 5 years you have to buy a new lock because they won't stand behind after that time period.  At the time of loss you have to have a police report, but large cities no longer do reports on stolen bikes, so you're screwed; you also have to have detailed photos of the undisturbed crime scene including what you locked the bike up to, if they disagree with what you locked the bike to you're screwed, pics of the area to make sure it had adequate public viewing and lighting if not you're screwed; you have to send back the broken lock, if the lock is missing you're screwed; if you have homeowners insurance they'll only pay the deductible; lock companies will find any excuse they can find to prevent paying out for a stolen bike.

So it's better just to have a floater attached to your homeowners insurance, it's a lot less hassle, while the insurance company may require a police report they will also accept a call number which they give you either over the phone without going out to see where the crime took place or when they come to you to discuss the theft, because insurance companies know that police reports aren't always going to be done. But all the other hassles the lock companies want done is gone.

Edit: I was going to buy the bike floater from State Farm but they quoted me the wrong price, for two bikes totaling $5,000 in coverage the cost was going to be $315 a year with a $300 deductible, I declined.  Instead I went with Velo Insurance who covered the Lynskey for $3,400 with a $300 deductible, and the Masi for $1,500 with a $200 deductible for $126...a huge difference in price over the State Farm policy.  I have a lot insurance with State Farm from all my personal stuff to my all my business stuff and thought I would get the bike insurance cheaper than $315 they ended up at.  SO IF any of you want coverage for a bike check out Velo Insurance, they are a broker for Markel insurance, but Dave at Velo knew a lot more about what he was talking about then the rep at Markel, and Dave was able to change the deductible from $300 for both to $300 and $200 for the same price as Markel quoted.  Dave was big help.  Anyway go online and look at the coverages they offer, I didn't take any of the medical, or liability provisions, or the stupid roadside assistance, or the world wide coverage; I have all of medical and liability stuff and insurance companies won't pay twice on that, so I declined all of those items and got just the basic coverage.
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: Inge on May 06, 2020, 02:16:15 am
I use a ring lock https://www.trelock.com/en/lock/locks/ring-locks/ring-locks/rs-453-p-o-c-az-balloon (https://www.trelock.com/en/lock/locks/ring-locks/ring-locks/rs-453-p-o-c-az-balloon)  - have to for insurance purposes. And have with me also a flexible cable (Knog ringmaster) I can attach to the lock/ the real world and to the bike (again).

The above is my main setup but besides that I also carry a very small lock (AXA Unisex's Roll Bike Cable Lock) as a second lock to add as ana extra deterent when I go shopping or to attach my bags to the bike. Even though it is cut through quickly it just gives a tad more protection, expecially if you place it in such a way that it is not obviously visible.
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: Patco on May 07, 2020, 11:08:11 pm
I have not taken a lock on my tours. Like many on this forum, when I stop for food I try to keep my bike in sight and what I do is I shift to the easiest gear. So, if there is a possible crime of opportunity they will be trying to speed away with a loaded bike and spinning like crazy, which theoretically should give me time to knock them off the bike. Also, I use speedplay pedals, so it is very hard to pedal without being locked in. Depending on the area, occasionally I have loosened the quick release on the rear wheel under the same principle that under power the wheel will drop from the rear drops and the bike will not be going anywhere, giving me time to recover. So far, no issues. Of course, now that I have said no issues, the bike gods may decide to slap me down.
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: Inge on May 08, 2020, 02:15:30 am
I like the idea of putting the bike in iets smallest gear. Am going to copy that  8).
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: John Nettles on May 08, 2020, 09:23:30 am
I use a ring lock https://www.trelock.com/en/lock/locks/ring-locks/ring-locks/rs-453-p-o-c-az-balloon (https://www.trelock.com/en/lock/locks/ring-locks/ring-locks/rs-453-p-o-c-az-balloon)  - have to for insurance purposes. And have with me also a flexible cable (Knog ringmaster) I can attach to the lock/ the real world and to the bike (again).


Inge,
What are the differences between the Trelock ring locks?  I went to the website and there are several variations of the same model, i.e. RS-453 POC (AZ, NAZ, Balloon), etc. 

Tailwinds, John
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: Inge on May 09, 2020, 03:10:28 am
The variations have to do mainly with the tire width and being able to attach a cable into the lock or not. Other than that I do not really know.

On my other bike I have 70 mm tyres and am using this lock (Frame Lock 5650L NR black OE (Art. no. 05185) https://www.abus.com/uk/Mobile-Security/Bike-Safety-and-Security/Locks/Frame-Locks/SHIELD-5650L (https://www.abus.com/uk/Mobile-Security/Bike-Safety-and-Security/Locks/Frame-Locks/SHIELD-5650L)   - this also for insurance purposes and it being the only lock that fit around these wide tyres  ;)
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: KionoKitse on May 14, 2020, 12:09:24 pm
Lots of really good ideas here. My number one point is to always have a bag of stuff that you can't afford to loose (phone, wallet, keys, etc) that you never part with. My second point is to make my bike look like a hassle to steal. Usually that involves a buch of heavy baggage, plenty of dust and mud and duct tape (usually this is taken care of by being on tour for a couple of days). Additionally I'll run anything through the spokes when I'm parked. Usually just some webbing that is holding the panniers together. This makes it impossible to ride off on and isn't easy to see given the additional junk on my bike. If I'm on tour and I know that I'll be leaving the bike some place for a while to go hiking or something I'll bring some braided steel cable with a lock to wrap around a tree and a small lock. If I'm camping and just staying the night, I'll run some of my tent poles through the frame so it will wake me up if someone tries to move the bike. In summary make your bike look not worth stealing and if someone tries to make it difficult for them to get away. Typically thieves would rather abort an attempt then risk getting caught.
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: froze on May 27, 2020, 09:44:17 am
The variations have to do mainly with the tire width and being able to attach a cable into the lock or not. Other than that I do not really know.

On my other bike I have 70 mm tyres and am using this lock (Frame Lock 5650L NR black OE (Art. no. 05185) https://www.abus.com/uk/Mobile-Security/Bike-Safety-and-Security/Locks/Frame-Locks/SHIELD-5650L (https://www.abus.com/uk/Mobile-Security/Bike-Safety-and-Security/Locks/Frame-Locks/SHIELD-5650L)   - this also for insurance purposes and it being the only lock that fit around these wide tyres  ;)

Did your insurance company specify any particular brands and models of locks that must be used?

I decided to go with Velo Insurance this month after replacing my previous touring bike due to a crash it might be wise to cover my new bike and my more expensive Lynskey.  I asked Velo if they had a list of required locks in order to make sure the theft part would be covered without any questions, and they said NO!  Just use any reasonable lock, so I asked them if my cable lock with the Abus lock was reasonable, and they said yes it was, though of course they reminded me it wasn't the most secure way, but I told them I never park the Lynskey anywhere that I can't see it, but the lock was more for the Masi touring bike when I'm at campgrounds and a store to buy supplies, and they said that lock would be fine. 

In 40 plus years I've used that same cable/lock, and locking up bikes with it while I was in college or at work I never had a theft attempt, even in Los Angeles.  I'm not saying for people who live in Los Angeles to use a simple cable lock, it just happened to work for me due to circumstances.

Anyway check with your insurance to see what they consider to be acceptable.  I do know that the frame lock you show would NOT be acceptable for Velo because you have to be able to lock the bike to a solid object, the lock you have would keep someone from riding off but they could just pick it up and run off with it, even though you and I know someone isn't going to just pick up a loaded touring bike and run off with it, but my insurance company said you have to lock the bike to something.
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: hikerjer on May 27, 2020, 10:37:11 pm
My home owners insurance is with Safeco/Liberty. I attached a rider to my policy which covers all my recreational gear - camping, skiing, bicycling, etc. I think it's around $25.00 a year and covers up to $3500.00 in loss, no deducible. Seems extremely reasonable to me.  Hopefully, I'll never have to find out if they are as good as their word/policy.
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: froze on May 27, 2020, 10:47:48 pm
State Farm wanted $375 a year for both of my bikes to be put on a floater, no deductible, but Velo wanted $160 with a $200 ded on one bike and $300 on the other, I took the cheapest deal. 

I can't believe Safeco only wanted $25 a year, if they cover loss due to accidents and theft you're getting a spectacular deal.  Read the floater page in your policy just to make sure you got what you think you got.
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: hikerjer on May 27, 2020, 10:50:36 pm
Ya, it does seem like a ridiculously good deal. Frankly, I was a bit shocked as well, but I've double and triple checked and it seems legit.  Might check it again, though.
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: Inge on May 28, 2020, 02:34:00 am
Froze - they just state that it has to be an ART2 certified lock - and yes this is accepted by the insurance. In the Netherlands lots of these locks are being used (especially on "city bikes") so all insurances do accept them as long as they are ART2 certified.
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: froze on May 28, 2020, 09:37:33 am
So does you lock Inge have a chain attached or no chain attached?  If it doesn't have a chain attached it's not worth much as a lock, because like I said before, if the bike isn't locked to something than someone can simply pick the bike up and run off with it, and work at breaking the lock at home.

I saw couple of those locks you have, one had a chain attached and one did not.  Like I said above, if it doesn't have a chain attached you need to get a lock to add to what you already have so you can lock the bike to a solid object.   

Even Velo insurance said the bike has to be locked to a solid object to be covered for theft, which only makes sense of course. 

But I would not rely on that lock you're talking about if there is no chain attached to it.  The one I saw with the chain is called Vinz Levanne Ring Lock, but I'm not sure if it's in production anymore because I couldn't find any place selling one or the company that makes it.
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: Inge on May 29, 2020, 03:18:47 am
As mentioned before it does not have a chain attached but it has the possibility to do so. On short trips around the house I do not bring my knogs cable but on longer road trips i do bring a cable to lock it to the world.
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: hospengr on July 18, 2020, 11:43:58 pm
I will be riding the Pacific Coast Route starting late August, solo.  I get it about locking the bike (or not), but what about the panniers while in camp, or going to the shower while in a state park campground?  Bike is locked, tent is up, panniers in tent, but there are still unscrupulous persons who go through "stuff" when no one is around.  I can certainly take valuables to the shower, but who wants to do that every day?
Any suggestions for security of panniers, even when at a restaurant or grocery store?
Thanks!
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: John Nettles on July 18, 2020, 11:53:29 pm
I always bring the very valuable stuff, i.e. wallet & phone with me regardless of where I go.  In 40+ years I have never had my stuff gone through, I least that I know of.  If I was concerned, I guess I could get a little luggage lock that would fit through the tent's zipper pulls.   Also, I have a long (about 15' or so) 1/8" coated cable that was made by my local Ace Hardware that I can insert through the pannier handle loops.  Of course, they could still go through but they could not get the panniers  ;D . 

That said, I have heard California's state parks are starting to get a bit overrun with homeless people.  It it is true, that may be more of an issue.  In which case, I would probably ask someone "reputable" to keep an eye on my tent site. 

Tailwinds, John
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: hospengr on July 19, 2020, 12:33:18 am
I always bring the very valuable stuff, i.e. wallet & phone with me regardless of where I go.  In 40+ years I have never had my stuff gone through, I least that I know of.  If I was concerned, I guess I could get a little luggage lock that would fit through the tent's zipper pulls.   Also, I have a long (about 15' or so) 1/8" coated cable that was made by my local Ace Hardware that I can insert through the pannier handle loops.  Of course, they could still go through but they could not get the panniers  ;D . 

That said, I have heard California's state parks are starting to get a bit overrun with homeless people.  It it is true, that may be more of an issue.  In which case, I would probably ask someone "reputable" to keep an eye on my tent site. 

Thanks John!
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: staehpj1 on July 19, 2020, 06:20:54 am
I have never had my stuff gone through
I will say that I have, but only by raccoons and only where there was a food odor.  They are very adept with zippers and some buckles.  As far as items lost to humans thieves, the only ones were a few things out in plain sight or tucked under a bungee or strap.  Some of the latter I was not positive if they were lost or stolen.  It was a pretty rare occurrence in my experiences and usually on hind sight I had left the item in question in a pretty tempting position where some kid had snagged it on a whim.
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: John Nettles on July 19, 2020, 08:27:07 am
OK, I forgot to include the thieving rotten little scoundrels.  Yes, I have been gotten by raccoons too on a couple of occasions.  And I have lost a few thinks such as shirts, shoes, etc. that were strapped to the rear rack but that was not stolen.  Sort of sucks to get to camp and find out you only have one camp shoe and the nearest place to buy shoes is 3 days ahead.


Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: staehpj1 on July 19, 2020, 09:16:52 am
OK, I forgot to include the thieving rotten little scoundrels.  Yes, I have been gotten by raccoons too on a couple of occasions.  And I have lost a few thinks such as shirts, shoes, etc. that were strapped to the rear rack but that was not stolen.  Sort of sucks to get to camp and find out you only have one camp shoe and the nearest place to buy shoes is 3 days ahead.
The stolen or suspected stolen items I have had that I can remember were:
Given the number of days I have toured I figure that isn't much.  The only one that was a big deal at all was the phone.

That doesn't count the stuff taken by furry critters but I haven't done bag with them either.  There is one particular front pannier that I once forgot a and left powerbar in, a raccoon opened it chewed and slobbered the powerbar up real good eating half of it before zipping it back up.  When I found it a day or two later the sent had permanently penetrated the pannier.  That pannier now always seems to get opened by raccoons and the contents strewn on the ground.  More often than not after emptying that pocket they zip it back up.  I haven't used that pannier in years, but I bet they'd still smell that powerbar and open that pocket.
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: adventure124 on August 07, 2020, 10:11:57 am
Hello,

I can recommend this lock https://www.amazon.com/Sanwo-Security-Resettable-Combination-Diameter(black)/dp/B01H4YGZX0/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=lightweight+bike+lock&qid=1596809468&sr=8-1

Kind regards,

Carina
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: hikerjer on August 07, 2020, 12:09:26 pm
I remember a sign at a national park campground.  "Be certain to secure your food and valuble items. We have have an unscrupulous population of ravens and racoons in the campground. They are intelligent, persistent and nasty."  Summed it up nicely, I thought.
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: TCS on August 07, 2020, 03:27:16 pm
You probably know by now that in todays modern world of battery powered tools there is a tool called the angle grinder that when fitted with specific type of blade and that blade is new it can cut through ANY lock in under 30 seconds, so the reality is no lock is safe.

A good blade..and a powerful angle grinder and a large capacity, fully charged battery and clamping the lock in a bench vice at a convenient height and angle and maybe under a minute rather than 30 seconds, but yeah, they can be cut.

Which is why there is now this:

https://www.skunklock.com/
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: PNWRider92 on August 22, 2020, 06:37:56 pm
OK, I forgot to include the thieving rotten little scoundrels.  Yes, I have been gotten by raccoons too on a couple of occasions.  And I have lost a few thinks such as shirts, shoes, etc. that were strapped to the rear rack but that was not stolen.  Sort of sucks to get to camp and find out you only have one camp shoe and the nearest place to buy shoes is 3 days ahead.

A jackass in Oatman, Arizona stole one of my off-bike shoes while we were eating. I saw him running down the street with it and caught him...

By jackass I mean donkeys. Oatman is famous for the wild burros that come into town daily to be fed by the tourist.

Otherwise, to the OP; I've never carried a lock on any of my tours. Can't say I've ever had an issue. I'll bring it into a store and if they refuse I either shop elsewhere if available or find somewhere to hide it out of way.
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: froze on August 22, 2020, 09:24:15 pm
Most campgrounds are pretty safe, people leave their tents all the time to go hiking, go someplace in the car, go fishing, whatever, and they leave all sorts of stuff in and around the tent, including unlocked bikes, and things don't get stolen.  Not saying it never happens, just saying it's rare.  I almost had an experience at a park, read below.

Regardless I lock my bike, and take my wallet and phone if I'm leaving on foot, everything else stays.  I lock my bike up to a park bench overnight as well, because someone could sneak in and take it while you sleep.  I'm a weird person when it comes to sleeping, I sense in my sleep if something is not right and will wake up instantly, even the most silent of sounds I'm awake.  So it's downpouring rain, it's night, and sound of the rain put me to sleep, about 2 hours later, still in a downpour, I was awaken by someone whispering to another person...I heard the whispering through the downpour!  They were about 50 feet away from me on the park road that went around the primitive tent site area, the one whisper said to other to check out the bike, by this time I had grabbed my axe and was peaking out a small hole I left for ventilation, this guy walks to within 5 feet of the bike then walks back to his buddy where he says in whisper, it's locked to the park bench, and they left. 

The reality is the only thing a thief wants is your bike, it can be taken quickly and sold fast, the rest of the stuff you have cannot be sold fast, and no pawn shop would want the crap either.  Thieves want a fast buck, and bikes represents that. Of course don't leave your wallet or your electronic device around unguarded; I don't take anything valuable in terms of a electronic device, just my iPhone SE, a small cheap phone.

If I was going to steal camping stuff I would simply pull my car up and take everything including the tent so it looks like to those around it's my stuff and I'm leaving.  But it better be a high end tent if I'm going to go through all that trouble!!  LOL!!
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: TCS on August 24, 2020, 11:32:09 pm
The only thing I ever had stolen - decades ago on a tour in California - was my helmet.  Yeah, my helmet.  Shrug.

Otherwise, to the OP; I've never carried a lock on any of my tours. Can't say I've ever had an issue. I'll bring it into a store and if they refuse I either shop elsewhere if available or find somewhere to hide it out of way.

I bring a lock.  I might be in a museum or expressing wonderment at some unique attraction or leisurely getting to know the local cuisine for a couple of hours.

I've been using an aluminum U-lock:  relatively light, looks the business and way harder to cut than a cable.
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: PNWRider92 on August 25, 2020, 07:18:41 pm
The only thing I ever had stolen - decades ago on a tour in California - was my helmet.  Yeah, my helmet.  Shrug.

Otherwise, to the OP; I've never carried a lock on any of my tours. Can't say I've ever had an issue. I'll bring it into a store and if they refuse I either shop elsewhere if available or find somewhere to hide it out of way.

I bring a lock.  I might be in a museum or expressing wonderment at some unique attraction or leisurely getting to know the local cuisine for a couple of hours.

I've been using an aluminum U-lock:  relatively light, looks the business and way harder to cut than a cable.

+1

I should also mention that I travel pretty light. 10-15lbs of gear. I probably leave a lot behind that the average tourer may not.
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: cyclist alan on September 30, 2020, 10:17:12 pm
 I agree that risk is there in large cities. I live in a small city and haven't faced any issues regarding this. But also I do not leave it locked outside for long time
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: BikePacker on October 01, 2020, 06:55:20 am
is it this bad when touring
I have found it to be zero bad.
Would encourage you to consider how you'd feel about a motion detector alarm.
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: staehpj1 on October 01, 2020, 08:03:43 am
is it this bad when touring
I have found it to be zero bad.
Would encourage you to consider how you'd feel about a motion detector alarm.
When considering motion alarms, consider how obnoxious false alarms will be in campgrounds.  I wouldn't even consider one unless I thought a false alarm was almost impossible.  If it was something that would go off due to the wind or animals in camp like marauding raccoons I'd avoid that type of alarms in favor of other options.  I guess they'd be okay outside diners and stores, but in camp at night I'd say no.
Title: Re: Security - locking your bike
Post by: jamawani on October 01, 2020, 09:58:19 am
I carry a basic coil cable with a combination lock.
Unfortunately, I no longer know the combo and it is locked on one end.
So, I just coil the cable around the lamp post anyway -
And slide the non-lock loop throught the lock - for looks.
Most of life is appearances, anyhoo.
Not to mention that bike & gear is 80+ lbs.