Adventure Cycling Association Forum

Bicycle Travel => Gear Talk => Topic started by: Saburo on November 11, 2020, 11:20:46 am

 
Title: Off the Bike Shoes
Post by: Saburo on November 11, 2020, 11:20:46 am
Anyone out there have recommendations for off the bike shoes for touring?

I use SPD shoes to ride but like to change into different shoes for walking around camp or off days.  I don't really like the non-SPD shoes for riding so just wearing regular shoes for both riding and off the bike won't work.  Any thoughts on packable, comfortable off the bike shoes?
Title: Re: Off the Bike Shoes
Post by: John Nelson on November 11, 2020, 05:04:10 pm
On long tours, I carry two pairs:
On shorter tours, I have taken just one pair, which is a compromise. They are essentially running shoes with a recessed cleat: Pearl Izumi X-Road Fuel III.
Title: Re: Off the Bike Shoes
Post by: Pat Lamb on November 12, 2020, 08:41:32 am
I ride in MTB shoes, so I can get off the bike for short periods during the day while remaining sure-footed.

When the day's ride is done, I'll put on some lightweight Teva sandals.  Shower in them, walk around town or camp in them, even do some short walks (up to a few miles, maybe).  Put on some heavy wool socks and they're good down to frosty (if it's not raining).
Title: Re: Off the Bike Shoes
Post by: hikerjer on November 12, 2020, 11:56:31 am
I use Shimano double sided pedals and carry two pair of shoes. Bike shoes with cleats which clip into the pedals for the vast majority of the riding and a pair of Teva sandals for walking and for rides usually around campgrounds or towns. The Tevas work well walking around town and on short hikes and for short rides.  A bit of a hassle to change shoes sometimes but I do like the to be clipped in when I ride.  Seems to work OK.
Title: Re: Off the Bike Shoes
Post by: driftlessregion on November 15, 2020, 05:50:41 pm
Crocs. Very light weight, good enough to walk, not hike, in. Ugly, but so what?
Title: Re: Off the Bike Shoes
Post by: hikerjer on November 15, 2020, 05:58:34 pm
I understand the appeal of crocs and wear them around the house and yard a lot.  The problem with them though, is what you pointed out.  They are just not good for walking long distances especially on rough terrain.  I do usually take a pair when backkpacking as they make great camp shoes and work well for moderate stream crossings.
Title: Re: Off the Bike Shoes
Post by: canalligators on November 17, 2020, 06:43:35 pm
Dissenting opinion.  In the interest of minimizing weight and bulk, I only take one pair of shoes, recessed cleat MTB shoes.  Good for cycling and walking.  Leaving them loose is comfy for use in camp.  Though I might take a pair of flexible boat shoes for swimming in rocky water.
Title: Re: Off the Bike Shoes
Post by: driftlessregion on November 17, 2020, 08:26:19 pm
Well, that may be the difference: at 68 years old I don't do a lot of walking after getting into camp.
Title: Re: Off the Bike Shoes
Post by: canalligators on November 19, 2020, 05:43:58 pm
Same age, same idea, but I occasionally need to walk somewhere for food, to see something interesting, or to wear on the train going to and fro.
Title: Re: Off the Bike Shoes
Post by: staehpj1 on November 19, 2020, 08:55:30 pm
For me it depends on the trip.
Title: Re: Off the Bike Shoes
Post by: cyclist alan on November 27, 2020, 11:55:42 pm
I use Shimano Outdoor bike shoes. These are good for Performance Tour and last for a comfortable fit on and off the bike. You may check here:-https://bikesreviewed.com/gear/best-bike-shoes/ (https://bikesreviewed.com/gear/best-bike-shoes/)
Title: Re: Off the Bike Shoes
Post by: hoverbird on December 01, 2020, 09:53:31 pm
What about just regular running/tennis shoes? I rode a lot as a teenager with toe clips, then did not ride for like 30 years. Just getting back into riding, I naturally went with toe clips and have never used clipless pedals. I like the flexibility of micro-adjustments of foot position in my toe clips, and I don't think I am losing much power compared to clipless. My regular shoes are comfortable on and off the bike. I hope you don't think I am an abhorrent savage! :)
Title: Re: Off the Bike Shoes
Post by: staehpj1 on December 02, 2020, 06:55:14 am
What about just regular running/tennis shoes? I rode a lot as a teenager with toe clips, then did not ride for like 30 years. Just getting back into riding, I naturally went with toe clips and have never used clipless pedals. I like the flexibility of micro-adjustments of foot position in my toe clips, and I don't think I am losing much power compared to clipless. My regular shoes are comfortable on and off the bike. I hope you don't think I am an abhorrent savage! :)
If they work for you, great.  The advantage of having a comfortable off bike shoe on is a nice plus.

On the other hand, I don't think I'd ever go back to clips and straps.  I felt that I needed to yank the strap tight enough that they were hard to get out of before they did any good.  I was an early adopter of SPD in mountain biking when SPD was introduced and used Look pedals on my road bike in those days and I was delighted to be rid of clips and straps.  I had been toying with putting Looks on my MTB so I was delighted when the SPDs were released and managed to get an SPD setup shipped to me before they were available in my state.  People complained about forgetting to clip out, but I immediately found it easier than loosening tight straps and found loose straps useless.

I also felt like clipless made me automatically put my foot in the correct position (assuming I did a correct setup).   The 3 degrees of float was plenty.  Clips and straps only locked in your position when used with racing shoes that had a cleat with a groove that engaged the pedal cage.

BTW, some folks here like to use those half clips with no straps.  More power to them, but to me that is just a annoying appendage that adds no additional value.  Folks who use them and like them can and should continue to use them if they like them, but I don't get it.
Title: Re: Off the Bike Shoes
Post by: HobbesOnTour on December 02, 2020, 10:50:38 am
What about just regular running/tennis shoes? I rode a lot as a teenager with toe clips, then did not ride for like 30 years. Just getting back into riding, I naturally went with toe clips and have never used clipless pedals. I like the flexibility of micro-adjustments of foot position in my toe clips, and I don't think I am losing much power compared to clipless. My regular shoes are comfortable on and off the bike. I hope you don't think I am an abhorrent savage! :)
Nope. You're not alone!  :D
I've toured all over Europe in sandals. In cooler weather I've a pair of very good merino socks.
There's something so juvenile and enjoyable about cycling through a puddle and feeling the water on my toes!
Relatively recently I added toeclips to my flat pedals, but that was because I found on damp, dewy mornings my feet would slip off. 
Title: Re: Off the Bike Shoes
Post by: janetanorth on December 29, 2020, 01:38:33 am
Bedrock sandals and a pair of split toe socks.
Title: Re: Off the Bike Shoes
Post by: misterflask on December 29, 2020, 08:26:46 am
I have carried:
Merrill trail runners, about a pound for the pair.  Make passable hiking shoes and are comfy.
A pair of slippers I picked up during a tour at Dollar General.  Less than a half pound, I expect.  Good to pad around camp.
Cheap foam flip-flops.  Just a few ounces. 

I've been eyeing the disposable flip-flops they issue after a pedicure.  Wouldn't last long and clearly aren't hikable, but weight and packspace would be negligible.

I ride with Shimano MTB SPD shoes.  They are comfy on the bike, and theoretically hikable, but i don't want to try it.  In the evening my feet want something different.
I like riding in my Shimano SPD sandals and they are super comfy off the bike, but it seems like grit gets under the straps and I fear them for a long ride.

Anybody toured with Power Straps?  Seems like that would solve the one-shoe conundrum.  I would have a pair but they really price-punish the big-footed.
Title: Re: Off the Bike Shoes
Post by: staehpj1 on December 29, 2020, 09:24:08 am
Cheap foam flip-flops.  Just a few ounces. 

I've been eyeing the disposable flip-flops they issue after a pedicure.  Wouldn't last long and clearly aren't hikable, but weight and packspace would be negligible.
I have considered trying the "Genesis - Lightweight, Packable, Travel-Friendly Sandal".  They look like they would be a pretty light but durable option.  They seem to be inspired by huaraches "barefoot" running sandals.  They come in at 4.6 ounces for men's size 9.  They claim the sole is guaranteed for 5000 miles. https://xeroshoes.com/shop/genesis/genesis-men/

They look interesting enough that I decided to order a pair.  It looks like they must be discontinued because most sellers are out of most sizes, but with some searching I found a pair in my size (12).

Also there are lots of YouTube videos for DIY huaraches.

Quote
Anybody toured with Power Straps?  Seems like that would solve the one-shoe conundrum.  I would have a pair but they really price-punish the big-footed.
I didn't like them.  Maybe if I had given them more time, but I found them kind of awkward to get into and out of especially with regular running shoes.   If they were tight enough to do any good I didn't like the way they squeezed my feet.  Not sure if I'd get used to them in time or not, but I don't plan to try.  I also like that clipless forces consistent foot placement.