Adventure Cycling Association Forum

Bicycle Travel => General Discussion => Topic started by: shepherdhike on March 19, 2009, 12:47:00 pm

 
Title: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: shepherdhike on March 19, 2009, 12:47:00 pm
Sorry if this shows up twice. I tried before and it didn't seem to post.

I like to carry pepper spray when I ride, but there is no good way to keep it close at hand. I started my tour with the can velcroed to the top tube, but it wasn't secure enough and kept falling off. I never needed it, but now I'm entering a region where I'd like to keep it handy. Does anyone have an awesome way to carry pepper spray?

Nancy
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: Damian on March 19, 2009, 01:04:28 pm
I carry mine in the side mesh pocket of my handlebar bag (Jandd). The elastic holds it nice and firm over bumps, but it's always ready if needed. BTW, I've never used it, but having had--and witnessed--some scary encounters with very aggressive dogs, I like having it handy.
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: shepherdhike on March 19, 2009, 01:26:24 pm
Hmm. My handlebar bag is adapted from a different type of sports bag. The mesh pocket is too deep. I wonder if I could stitch across the bottom of it so the spray wouldn't drop down in so far. Could it really have been that simple all along?

Nancy
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: mucknort on March 19, 2009, 02:06:37 pm
If the "pepper spray" you use is Halt!, then this plastic holder allows you to clip it on to your handlebars (and it works great!):

http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_119970_-1___
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: whittierider on March 19, 2009, 02:32:22 pm
I've put it in my jersey pocket, but found that the wind broke up the stream so much it was ineffective, unlike the situations when I was a pedestrian.  A loud, authoritative yell starting with an explosive sound, like "Back off!" will usually intimidate an agressive dog.
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: mucknort on March 19, 2009, 02:43:13 pm
I've put it in my jersey pocket, but found that the wind broke up the stream so much it was ineffective, unlike the situations when I was a pedestrian.

That's why you either need to wait until they are close enough to "see the white's of their eyes" or stop, get off your bike, and spray.


A loud, authoritative yell starting with an explosive sound, like "Back off!" will usually intimidate an agressive dog.

I've found yelling "Bad Dog, go home" works well with many dogs.
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: shepherdhike on March 19, 2009, 03:04:24 pm
The Nashbar Halt holder looks like it would do the trick...if there was any room on my handlebars. I had an idea to make something similar out of PVC to clip on the top tube, but I don't have any tools here.
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: mikedirectory2 on March 19, 2009, 03:19:34 pm
If the "pepper spray" you use is Halt!, then this plastic holder allows you to clip it on to your handlebars (and it works great!):

http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_119970_-1___

Thats really good to know!  Thanks!
http://www.bikecarrierdirect.com
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: mucknort on March 19, 2009, 06:07:33 pm
The Nashbar Halt holder looks like it would do the trick...if there was any room on my handlebars.
The Halt! holder comes in 2 different sizes, so it is possible to attach it to your frame if your bars are full.
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: Westinghouse on March 20, 2009, 12:49:50 am
Nancy: I wrote this article quickly, unrevised, for another cyclist. It does much more than just answer the question you asked. In my 34,000 miles of touring I have never had to use any kind of instrument against a dog. The dumb animal is only obeying some kind of genetically imprinted code when it goes bounding across the yard, and out into the road to chase along at your heels. Dogs have held me up many times. Never did it come to the point that chemical or other pain causing insstruments had to be used. I am referring to the friendly, domesticated dogs we are used to encountering in North America.


As for dogs on tour, I have had many experiences with them. Some cyclists might carry pepper spray, which I have done but never used. I saw another advise carrying a water pistol containing a mixture of water and ammonia; this I have never done. The fact is that dogs can be an occasional annoyance or hassle or whatever, but by and large they are not a real danger unless one comes charging at you from out of nowhere, startling you, and causing you to involuntarily swerve out into traffic. It happens.

There is something about the movement of cycling that sets dogs off into a headstrong frenzy of barking and chasing. I mean, you come along, and there is some dog in a yard. It has been lolloing around all day perhaps. It catches sight of you going by on your bike, and it immediately goes nuts. It starts barking, snarling, yelping, and growling, and chasing you at high speed and going for your heels with all its might. I have seen dogs go absolutely bananas at the sight of me cycling, even if I was two hundred feet away from them. I have seen them come charging out at me, stopped only by a fence around thge property. They would follow all along the fence line to the end, and then go ape trying to jump over the fence or tunnel under it.  This kind of reaction comes from dogs of all sizes from the largest dogs to even those little Mexican Chihuahuas. That is no kidding. I wa cycling through some town. Somebody was carrying one of those little Mexican dogs. It saw me. It went crazy trying to jump from its owners arms and chase along.

I have worked out a manner of dealing with dogs. In spite of all the noise and chases not one dog has ever actually bitten me.  However, they do seem to be fond of going for the feet, and some have come close to biting. First, slow down a bit, look at the dog and yell out a loud, sharp report, and when I say loud and sharp that is what is meant; something like you might expect to hear from a marine corps drill sargent. You might have to yell a number of times. The yelling will bring some dogs to a halt. Some will stop temporarily and continue, and slow down or halt every time you yell. Just yell out hut or ha loud, sharp, and clear. If that does not dissuade the cur from pursuing his pleasure or whatever it is he gets out of the chase, come to a dead stop and give him the yell. He will stop. He may turn around and take off. He may tarry a while and snip and growl. He may come close, but my experience is the actual attack will not happen. I have cycled 34,000 miles through 19 countries, and six or more times across the USA, so I know of what I speak.

I have always ridden an upright touring bike, therefore, having a dog running along and chasing at my heels is a different matter from riding a recumbent with the animal more nearly at the vital parts such as torso, head, and throat. My general advice is this. If you are concerned, do what I have told you, and carry a water pistol with water and ammonia in it, if legal to do so, or a very good pepper spray, not one of those little key chain things, but a canister with a real fog or large volume spray that comes out, but do not use it as a first response. If you yell and stop and yell, the dog will stop his pursuit. In other words, do not run and it will not chase. Often, as you are stopped at the roadside waiting for the animal to lose interest, its owner will come out and call it back, and it trots on home. If you stop and it stops and loses interest, it might head back to its territory on its own, but if you take off it will turn around and continue chasing. Dogs, for the most part, are a temporary nuisance, but not a real serious danger. However, I am sure cyclists have been actually attacked, and perhaps even injured.

When stopped, the hound may come close, but will not actually sink its teeth into your hide. If it is particularly vicious or mean, give him a whif of the pepper spray or whatever, but I have never found that to be necessary. If you get off the bike and walk a ways, which you would not or might not be able to do, it could lose interest; get back on and cycle away, and it will pick up where it left off, or just go home.

Try not to let a dog catch you by surprise in close quarters. That happened to me once, and I tipped over injuring my ankle. It was at night on a quiet, placid road. A very large dog came charging aggressively from out of the bushes near the side of the road. All of a sudden I heard this very loud barking and snarling, and saw a blur out of the corner of my eye. In an attempt to stop, dismount immediately, and get the bike beteen myself and the attacking dog, I forgot my feet were strapped into the pedals, and tried to get off on the right of the bike, I fell over and twisted my ankle. Well, at least I fell over away from the dog and not toward it. After all that the dog just stood there looking at me, and turned around and left. It was one of the larger breeds of dog, and I am sure it would not have harmed me, but it caught me completely unexpected, and I reacted unthinking with a start. There was no time to think through what to do. The subconscious mind told me I was under attack and needed to respond, and I did.

You might have dog problems in some areas at times, and no dog problems whatsoever in other places. In 1984 in winter along highway 90 in Florida free ranging dogs were all over the place, and I might add, were often seen dead along the roadside after having been slammed by motor vehicles. In 2007 I cycled 90, and ther was not the first problem with the first dog; very different from 1984. In countrified areas dog owners may be more disposed to letting their dogs roam free. Some may be fenced in, but have some little tunnel dug out under the fence in some bush-covered corner. They actually seem to be smart enough to try and cover or hide their tunnels. Anyway, that is about all I can tell you. If you go into Eastern Europe, you may find canines of a very different stripe; very different from the friendly domesticated kind we are used to in the USA. For some of those dogs I encountered in eastern Europe, nothing short of a 12 guage shotgun would save you. 
 
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: shepherdhike on March 20, 2009, 09:53:57 am
Hi Westinghouse, Thanks for your great comments. I've not had trouble with dogs so far in my trip, but I have while riding at home. I don't care if a dog wants to bark and defend its territory. But I'm not in its territory. It has no business chasing me down the road, whether it's gonna bite me or not. It's dangerous for everyone. I figure spraying a dog is doing it a favor if it learns to stay off the road. If an owner won't train the dog, I will.

And it's not just dogs I'm concerned about.
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: Westinghouse on March 20, 2009, 05:53:30 pm
The two legged dogs are the real danger. A 22 derringer would be useful, but only in a serious situation. Even if you are licensed to carry a concealed firearm in one state, it may not be valid in another state. Some gunshops may have a publication listing which states acknowledge licenses for concealed firearms from other states. If you did end up absolutely having to use deadly force in a state where your license to carry were not recognized, it is better to be judged by twelve than carried by six. I myself have never carried any kind of firearm or any kind of weapon.
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: johnsondasw on March 21, 2009, 12:56:39 am

As for dogs, I've been using the same defense for years.  If they get close enough, I have my foot unclipped and kick 'em in the head.  It's been very successful.  They seem to usually sense the danger and back off.  I think they can feel that I'm not afraid of them and am willing to be the "aggressor-in-defense".  Occassionally, they get too close, and get nailed.  I hate dogs that chase bikes, and do not feel bad in the least about teaching them a hard lesson.

There is a hazard in this.  You have to be an experienced, steady rider so you don't throw yourself off balance and swerve into traffic or off the road, or worse, fall.  None of these have ever happened to me.

I have also, in the past, carried rocks when I know there's a bike-chaser on my route.  This has also worked well, especially when I've used the handful of small rocks shotgun approach.
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: mucknort on March 21, 2009, 11:48:18 am
I have also, in the past, carried rocks when I know there's a bike-chaser on my route.  This has also worked well, especially when I've used the handful of small rocks shotgun approach.
For many dogs, you don't even need to have a real rock. A friend that toured the Hawaiin Islands was taught the trick of bending down and pretending to pick up a rock and cocking your arm back as if you are about to throw. I have used this "fake" on occasion when other things didn't work. Of course, you have to be stationary/on foot to pull this off.
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: mucknort on March 21, 2009, 11:52:42 am
New-ish to this board and I'm wondering if this topic will get as nasty as I've seen happen on other bicycle forums. OP poster just asked for advice on ways to mount pepper spray. Now we've gone from swinging tire pumps to ammonia additives in water bottles to carrying firearms to head kicking. Here's hoping discussion stays civil.
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: bobbyrob22 on March 22, 2009, 06:26:29 pm
I was chased once by a dog and when I figured out that the dog wasnt going to give up the chase despite the fact I was rolling about 30 mph downhill I quickly stopped, jumped off my bike and ran towards the dog screaming at the top of my lungs. In a split second that dog turned with  his tail tucked and whinning as I was chasing him back to his territory. The next couple of times I went through there the dog has never even hardly looked at me as I passed by.

As far as carrying pepper spray I do have a bottle (17%) that goes with me everywhere but dogs arent the reason I carry it, those terrible two legged creatures is what I have mine for. :) But I can see it being used on dogs because some dogs just wont give up and are mean as hell. The only time I ran across a dog that deserved a good spray, I wasnt carrying any at the time and needless to say I thought the dog was gonna tear me a new one until the owner quickly commanded the dog to return. Wish I had some good pepper spray that day.
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: BIGRIDE on March 29, 2009, 10:26:47 am
I just use halt and I clip it to my waist pack. no problems so far with over 2000 miles in the past yr :)
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: litespeed on April 03, 2009, 10:30:03 pm
I've never had a problem with aggressive humans in some 25,000+ miles around the US and Canada. As for dogs my favorite tactic is to swerve back and forth (if you have the room). They get hopelessly confused. I have run dogs into telephone and light poles doing this, had two dogs get all tangled up with each other and go down in a cloud of dust, seen them stumble into a ditch and culvert, etc. Usually they just give up totally baffled. 

A friend of mine was crawling up a hill when two fearsome rottweillers came after him. He yelled "Sit!". The two dogs instantly sat down in the road. When he got to the top of the hill he looked back. The two dogs were still sitting there.
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: TwoWheeledExplorer on April 06, 2009, 10:04:53 am
A friend of mine was crawling up a hill when two fearsome rottweillers came after him. He yelled "Sit!". The two dogs instantly sat down in the road. When he got to the top of the hill he looked back. The two dogs were still sitting there.

As a former K-9 handler, I have to love that one. You have to be careful, as some protection-trained breeds (Rotties, German Shepherds, Dobes) are taught commands in German. (Setz!=Sit, Bleib!=Stay, Nein!=No, Aus!=Out/Break off attack, etc.) but I have found "NO!" in a good 'command voice', as we used to call it. works most of the time for me. I also have found that often just talking to the dog confuses the heck out of them. I have one fat, old Lab in my neighborhood who lumbers out after me whenever I go past his house. I actually slow down and say something like, "Now that you caught me, what are you go to do?" He just stops and stands there.

In the park where I work, when I go by a campsite on bike patrol and a dog (who is supposed to be on leash) comes out of a site after me, I usually stop and remind them (and, by default their owners) that this is "my campground" and they shouldn't be chasing the ranger. I did have one very over-protective Shepherd in a site last year who merited a bit more "correction" borrowed from my days as handler, but it's a rare occurance.
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: mikedirectory2 on April 06, 2009, 08:04:31 pm
I have also, in the past, carried rocks when I know there's a bike-chaser on my route.  This has also worked well, especially when I've used the handful of small rocks shotgun approach.
For many dogs, you don't even need to have a real rock. A friend that toured the Hawaiin Islands was taught the trick of bending down and pretending to pick up a rock and cocking your arm back as if you are about to throw. I have used this "fake" on occasion when other things didn't work. Of course, you have to be stationary/on foot to pull this off.

Thank you for suggesting something that isnt cruel to animals.  I am all for protecting yourself, but lets try not to hurt dogs.
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: johnsondasw on April 06, 2009, 11:45:59 pm
I don't see where all this sympathy for bike-chasing dogs is coming from.  I love dogs, have owned several, and think they're wonderful animals.  I controlled my dogs, taught them decent behavior, and never had problems with aggresive behavior from them. 

But when it comes to chasing bikes, I think they need to be dealt with in whatever means necessary, within reason, to protect oneself and deter them from repeating the behavior.  If this causes pain to the dog, well, pain aversion can be a good thing if it means the dog stops chasing bikes.  A dog chasing a biker can get in front of the bike and causer an accident, as happened to me.  Fortunately just severe road rash and bruising on that one.  Or the dog can cause the biker to fall into traffic, resulting insevere injury or death.  Or, as happened to a dog that tore out into the road to chase a friend of mine, the behavior can result in death to the dog--it was hit by a semi passing the biker.

Owners need to control their dogs if they live by a road.  With the stakes being as high as they are, I just can't get into the "don't hurt the dog" thing.  Hurting the dog may teach it to change the behavior, and if the behavior doesn't change, there may be a disaster in the making for bikers, drivers, and dogs.

Again, it's not about cruelty to dogs.  It's about deterrence of dangerous and irresponsible behavior. 
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: TwoWheeledExplorer on April 07, 2009, 07:11:51 pm
If a dog (or any other animal) is attacking you, you have the right to protect yourself. That is not "cruelty". It is common sense. If it comes down to me hurting the dog or the dog hurting me, I am going to hurt the dog.

Sorry, (Well, not really.) but my safety and the safety of my party comes first.

Hans
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: 2010 on April 08, 2009, 07:17:36 pm
Sorry if this shows up twice. I tried before and it didn't seem to post.

I like to carry pepper spray when I ride, but there is no good way to keep it close at hand. I started my tour with the can velcroed to the top tube, but it wasn't secure enough and kept falling off. I never needed it, but now I'm entering a region where I'd like to keep it handy. Does anyone have an awesome way to carry pepper spray?

Nancy
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: Westinghouse on April 09, 2009, 11:31:43 am
Easy answer. Put it on top in your handlebar bag, and leave it unzipped. Those little key-chain sized pepper sprays are a joke. Get the big aerosol can that puts out a serious stream or fog. If you must use it, you want to make sure you can get a serious dose of it directly into the face and eyes.
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: mikedirectory2 on April 09, 2009, 06:39:51 pm
A friend of mine was crawling up a hill when two fearsome rottweillers came after him. He yelled "Sit!". The two dogs instantly sat down in the road. When he got to the top of the hill he looked back. The two dogs were still sitting there.

As a former K-9 handler, I have to love that one. You have to be careful, as some protection-trained breeds (Rotties, German Shepherds, Dobes) are taught commands in German. (Setz!=Sit, Bleib!=Stay, Nein!=No, Aus!=Out/Break off attack, etc.) but I have found "NO!" in a good 'command voice', as we used to call it. works most of the time for me. I also have found that often just talking to the dog confuses the heck out of them. I have one fat, old Lab in my neighborhood who lumbers out after me whenever I go past his house. I actually slow down and say something like, "Now that you caught me, what are you go to do?" He just stops and stands there.

In the park where I work, when I go by a campsite on bike patrol and a dog (who is supposed to be on leash) comes out of a site after me, I usually stop and remind them (and, by default their owners) that this is "my campground" and they shouldn't be chasing the ranger. I did have one very over-protective Shepherd in a site last year who merited a bit more "correction" borrowed from my days as handler, but it's a rare occurance.
That is very helpful to know the different languages, but I do agree that it is the tone of voice that means the most.
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: kemmett on April 13, 2009, 03:24:45 pm
One simple phrase,

Colt 1911 .45 ACP

no one and nothing will bother you, guaranteed
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: bogiesan on April 14, 2009, 08:52:14 am
>Colt 1911 .45 ACP

Since we have approached and then crossed the information/power trope of the possibly mythical meanings afforded by various interpretations of our Second Amendment, it should be safe to assume this post has, at last, propelled the thread to meme status and it is no longer a Foucaultian discourse. With that presumed level of absurdity, I continue:

Colt does not list the mass of their products on their Website so I'll guess a WWI replica 45 is about 6 pounds?
Is there an ultralight version of that? Goretex? Carbon?

Here in Iderho, our good folks carry guns for lots of different reasons. If it's not to protect the women and sheep from the jihadists coming out of the Chinese tunnels, it's to protect ourselves from each other's free-range dogs, which are, it must be noted, legitimately protecting us from the reintroduced grizzlies and wolf packs. It's all quite confusing around here because the dog may itself be armed.

david boise ID
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: mucknort on April 14, 2009, 01:50:04 pm
>Colt 1911 .45 ACP

Since we have approached and then crossed the information/power trope of the possibly mythical meanings afforded by various interpretations of our Second Amendment, it should be safe to assume this post has, at last, propelled the thread to meme status and it is no longer a Foucaultian discourse. With that presumed level of absurdity, I continue:

Colt does not list the mass of their products on their Website so I'll guess a WWI replica 45 is about 6 pounds?
Is there an ultralight version of that? Goretex? Carbon?

Here in Iderho, our good folks carry guns for lots of different reasons. If it's not to protect the women and sheep from the jihadists coming out of the Chinese tunnels, it's to protect ourselves from each other's free-range dogs, which are, it must be noted, legitimately protecting us from the reintroduced grizzlies and wolf packs. It's all quite confusing around here because the dog may itself be armed.


david boise ID

 ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: DaveB on April 14, 2009, 08:25:53 pm
Colt does not list the mass of their products on their Website so I'll guess a WWI replica 45 is about 6 pounds?
The standard full size steel frame 1911 weighs about 37 oz and an alloy frame shortened version gets the weight down to about 25 oz. 

BTW, Colt is pretty much out of the civilian firearms business but there are dozens of makers of the basic 1911 and variouss improved upgraded models.
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: kemmett on April 17, 2009, 09:53:25 am
I would never recommend to anyone to carry a firearm while bike riding, or anywhere in public for that matter.  I wish a keyboard had the sarcasm key or something along those lines.  It was merely a jest, and I hope it was received that way.  Pepper spray is a great idea, just be sure not to carry anything you don't intend to use. 
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: mucknort on April 17, 2009, 12:51:47 pm
I would never recommend to anyone to carry a firearm while bike riding, or anywhere in public for that matter.  I wish a keyboard had the sarcasm key or something along those lines.  It was merely a jest, and I hope it was received that way.  Pepper spray is a great idea, just be sure not to carry anything you don't intend to use. 
There are plenty of "smilies" available to ensure folks recognize your post as being sarcastic. I took your post as a serious endorsement to carry firearms, since I've read too many posts from gun nuts on other forums who are deadly serious.
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: clark1 on December 29, 2009, 11:56:06 pm
me too, I always carry my pepper spray (http://www.weapons-universe.com/Personal_Defense/Pepper_Spray.shtml). Just to be sure if there are bad people will come, I have my personal self defense.
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: ronnie421 on December 30, 2009, 03:15:45 am
I'm just curious... I am planning my very first TA tour next year (I cant wait!) with my girlfriend and I do have a concealed handgun permit from the State of Texas.  But does anyone know someone or know OF someone who has ever been robbed of their equipment, bikes, supplies, etc. by worthless punks just looking for something "cool" to do while way out in the middle of nowhere and police assistance is miles away? There ARE people who will do that, I'm sure.  And I dont plan on shooting anyone if all they want is our stuff.  A person's life (even a bad person) is not worth taking if all he wants is our stuff.  Let them take it. All our stuff is replaceable... bikes and all.   I'm sure someone will help out and give us a ride to the next town to get help and plan a way to get home.  But I am traveling with my girlfriend. She is a highly attractive 22 year old that I would die if I was not able to defend her IF these creeps decided that they wanted MORE than our stuff. Out in the middle of nowhere? No help for miles and miles away? Maybe its a bigger picture in my head than it should be, but has this ever happened to anyone? I never leave my HOUSE without my SIG P220 .45 cal strapped to my hip.  I cant imagine leaving the STATE without it.     
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: tonythomson on December 30, 2009, 09:41:22 am
I find this fascinating as of course here in UK we don't carry any kind of weapon.  I have cycled most places around the world and as yet have never encountered any situation needing to take up arms.  I did develop the snear that  guy from Hill Street Blues used  but that just made people laugh.

Of course you need to be aware of who  is around and use your common sense for your own protection.  I always work on the assumption that if it doesn't feel OK move on.  I think you have to be very unlucky to meet these characters out in the country side, more danger from a passing truck.  There are many women travelling by bike alone out there maybe they can give good advise.  I have also spent a lot of time in the USA, cycled across twice and  all the people I have met have been great  - never felt once in any danger. 

I agree material things can be replaced and no one is worth getting hurt for them. 

Now dogs are a different thing, right p in the a.  But I like the get off and confront them with a loud command way of doing things, or use them to your advantage if going up hill, amazing how it helps you reach the top having one snapping at your heals.

Ronnie and girl friend have a great trip and enjoy - they're not really out to get you.
Tony
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: ronnie421 on December 30, 2009, 09:43:30 pm
Thanks Tony,...

Maybe those are some words that I just needed to hear (read).  I'm not overly paranoid over it or anything.  I dont let that thought consume my whole trip.  But it has occasionally crossed my mind.  Well, maybe I won't carry.  Maybe just a good can of pepper spray for the four legged creeps!     
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: mikedirectory2 on December 31, 2009, 09:59:17 am
I find this fascinating as of course here in UK we don't carry any kind of weapon.  I have cycled most places around the world and as yet have never encountered any situation needing to take up arms.  I did develop the snear that  guy from Hill Street Blues used  but that just made people laugh.

Of course you need to be aware of who  is around and use your common sense for your own protection.  I always work on the assumption that if it doesn't feel OK move on.  I think you have to be very unlucky to meet these characters out in the country side, more danger from a passing truck.  There are many women travelling by bike alone out there maybe they can give good advise.  I have also spent a lot of time in the USA, cycled across twice and  all the people I have met have been great  - never felt once in any danger. 

I agree material things can be replaced and no one is worth getting hurt for them. 

Now dogs are a different thing, right p in the a.  But I like the get off and confront them with a loud command way of doing things, or use them to your advantage if going up hill, amazing how it helps you reach the top having one snapping at your heals.

Ronnie and girl friend have a great trip and enjoy - they're not really out to get you.
Tony

Good advice!
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: driftlessregion on January 02, 2010, 09:15:35 pm
Don't bring your concealed weapon here to Wisconsin. We're still somewhat civilized and concealed carry is illegal.

Now to your question, being robbed the way you describe is extremely rare. The tales of anything like this far exceed the reality and yet I have never heard of a case.
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: tearlach on January 17, 2010, 12:33:00 pm
Well, here we go again. First, best response to a dog: stop and yell. Works almost every time. If you use spray, get a BIG jug, you want to hit the dog before you run out. As for Wisconsin, the laws have changed. Keep up. As for the UK, highest rate of violent assault in the world. Enough said. If you are out in nowhere,  you are alone and on your own. No cops, no help. They can do what they want, unless you can stop them. Different states have different laws, check if TX has reciprocity with the state in question. I carry all the time, I am civilized, educated, and experienced. I choose to defend myself. If you don't, fine. I am not a gun nut. Just been alive over half a century and seen some bad things happen. If you have not, cool. As for Iderho, that first paragraph was cute. Really. You should write for a junior high paper. Some years ago, I was in your state. Had to shoot and kill a man committing a rape at a roadside rest in broad daylight. Don't tell me about Idaho. Thanks.
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: tonythomson on January 18, 2010, 09:07:39 am
"Easy Tiger"  don't take Davids amusing comments to heart, we all love them.  As for us peace loving bunch over here in UK well I agree like all countries there are places you just do not go at night (unfortunately) but they are not the kind of places you would be cycling in anyway.  So let's leave the paranoia behind and enjoy our riding - (maybe enhanced a little by spraying a pooch now and again for fun)
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: Tourista829 on January 18, 2010, 01:39:50 pm
This whole thread has become truly crazy. I believe if you carry a hand gun, someday you will use it. I know someone who did. He was a former police officer and faced civil and criminal prosecution. In 40 years of cycling, although I have kept Halt on my stem, or now with the thicker stems, put it on the side of my handle bar bag, I have never had to use it. I do not like to outrun dogs because I also know of another person that was seriously injured when the dog got tangled in his front wheel. Common sense is the key to a safe resolution. Like the others, if it is a difficult situation, I stop, put the bike between me and the dog(s) and depending on the dog, determines what tone I use. I sometimes take a couple of Milk Bone snacks and throw them about ten feet away. I have had good success with that. Animals are abused enough, I am not going to contribute to it, unless I have no other choice. I have read somewhere that bicycle wheels emit a high frequency that irritate the dogs. Answering your original question, like another respondent said, I took my Jandd handle bar bag to a shoemaker, since it didn't have side pockets, and he sewed an elastic band, on the right side and I simply clip the Halt to it :)
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: weight loss log on January 19, 2010, 03:12:56 pm
Yeah the one with the clip is definitly the best for me at least.
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: 10speed on January 24, 2010, 06:30:59 pm
This whole thread has become truly crazy.


And I love it :)   

most entertainment this forum has offered yet
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: mucknort on January 24, 2010, 07:49:56 pm
I have read somewhere that bicycle wheels emit a high frequency that irritate the dogs.

Oooh, never heard of that one. Sounds like a good one to submit to Mythbusters!
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: tonythomson on January 25, 2010, 05:28:25 am
"I have read somewhere that bicycle wheels emit a high frequency that irritate the dogs."

Is that a bit like dog whistles are such high frequency that they are inaudible to the human ear.  And all these years I never realised my dog was whistling at me!

Seriously it would be good to know what about bikes cause dogs to go bananas - Set a dog off the other day and there was no way he could have seen me.
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: Tourista829 on January 25, 2010, 03:13:55 pm
I actually heard it from our veterinarian. At the time, it sounded as good as any of the above explanations. I guess it is time to change vets ;D LOL.
Title: Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
Post by: velo on January 25, 2010, 04:17:47 pm
I've carried a small thing of pepper spray in my jersey pocket. I've also carried bear mace in the mesh side pocket of my jandd handlebar bag. After some guy in Northern Minnesota called his dogs on us I now consider any bear mace fair game.  The only reason we didn't get bitten was that my touring partner kicked on of the beasts solidly in the throat.

You could probably make a velco mount for it to attach a canister to your stem.